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Old 01-28-2009, 12:50 PM   #1
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Cast Iron Reversable Griddle Seasoning Question

I bought a Lodge reversable griddle one that's flat on one side and ribbled on the other. It's pre-seasoned like my other Lodge products but with those, I still did my standard "cook cornbread" thing and then used them. With a flat griddle I could try the cornbread but with the ribbed side, no way. Can I trust that this is really pre-seasoned enough to just start cooking on after just a coat of oil? I've wanted one of these forever and I bought it for myself today for my birthday. Just not sure if I should jump in and cook a couple of steaks on it for dinner or if I have to do something to make it so I can cook on it.

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Old 01-28-2009, 12:59 PM   #2
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cook bacon (yes even on the ribbed side). It is one of the best ways to season CI.
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Old 01-28-2009, 01:28 PM   #3
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I got the 12" griddle for Christmas. It came preseasoned. The first time I cooked on it, all I did was a light coating of oil and then went to town with sausages and pancakes. No problems. I think you'll be fine with the steaks. The seasoning will improve the more you use it just like other CI.
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Old 01-28-2009, 01:50 PM   #4
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I have cooked on my preseasoned Lodge CI with just one coat of oil. It worked okay but will get better with time and use.
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Old 01-28-2009, 09:37 PM   #5
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So here's a question. I noticed that when I cooked on the ribbed side tonight the flat side got sticky (you know how oil gets sticky when it's heated but not cooked on). This concerns me. Will one side always be sticky?
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Old 01-30-2009, 02:31 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
So here's a question. I noticed that when I cooked on the ribbed side tonight the flat side got sticky (you know how oil gets sticky when it's heated but not cooked on). This concerns me. Will one side always be sticky?

I believe that's caused by oxidized vegetable oil, if so then it's my guess that yes, it will always get sticky.

I don't like vegetable oil.
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Old 01-30-2009, 02:41 PM   #7
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Heres my question.

Your suppose to get a ribbed grill really hot to make a decent steak.

But to get it really hot would 'burn out' the iron? Or at least cause degradation of the seasoning?

Mayhaps I'm confusing really hot for really hot, because my really hot is really really hot. A grill (charcoal) is suppose to be 450 ~ 500 degrees? I can get that.

So to me seasoning a ribbed iron cook surface only to take the seasoning to destructive temps seems at odds.
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Old 01-30-2009, 11:56 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Wart View Post
Heres my question.

Your suppose to get a ribbed grill really hot to make a decent steak.

But to get it really hot would 'burn out' the iron? Or at least cause degradation of the seasoning?

Mayhaps I'm confusing really hot for really hot, because my really hot is really really hot. A grill (charcoal) is suppose to be 450 ~ 500 degrees? I can get that.

So to me seasoning a ribbed iron cook surface only to take the seasoning to destructive temps seems at odds.
I have a couple #8 cast iron skillets, and use one of them regularly to REALLY sear things, and the seasoning is pretty spotty on it. I've burned out most of the seasoning, but don't have a rust problem and don't have issues with stuff sticking too much. It's dull though, not shiny like well-seasoned cast iron.

I've also run into this problem with my enamel coated SS grill pan. The fat drains to the bottom, and then burns off(there's nothing to absorb the heat at the bottom of the "fins") and the top of the fins dry off easily and it burns off there too. I just use it to make nice grill marks on stuff when I'm too lazy to walk the 30 feet to go outside and grill something. I've given up on properly seasoning that pan too.
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