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Old 09-16-2017, 07:30 AM   #11
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dark color pots/pans absorb more radiant heat in the oven than shiny / light colored things. there is an effect, whether it's (darkened) cast iron or dark enamel ware.

(a) 170'c is a bit too hot for a braise and (b) if the 'new' cast iron has gone dark, not a huge surprise that it boiled out the liquid and (c) covered but not really certainly contributed.
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Old 09-18-2017, 06:11 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
That temperature is a bit high -- higher than I would use. But it wasn't so high that it should have burned the meat, as long as the meat remained wet.

Try a temp at or below 300F (about 150C), and check the liquid level from time-to-time to keep your meat just covered.

CD
For braising, the liquid should not cover the meat. I only put in enough wine/stock mixture to submerge the meat about half way when braising short ribs.

I've never had an issue with overcooking when braising at 350°F, or about 175°C, but it should only take about 2-2½ hours at most, not 4. My favorite short rib recipe is the one at Bon Appetit(.com) - YUM!
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Old 09-23-2017, 09:37 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
dark color pots/pans absorb more radiant heat in the oven than shiny / light colored things. there is an effect, whether it's (darkened) cast iron or dark enamel ware.
This I can agree with as I've noticed while baking in black cast iron. It always seems to be done before the recommended time and I keep my eye on it before it's supposed to be done. Same thing true about dark colored glassware in the oven.

If cooking on the stovetop with your new skillet medium to medium high heat is all you need except for searing. But I don't use extreme high heat with vintage cast, it helps to preheat in the oven first then the burner to sear with the older ones because they are thinner.
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Old 10-13-2017, 08:50 AM   #14
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Didn't get, why black pan absorbs more heat. Are you talking about the electrical oven?
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