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Old 10-15-2006, 11:08 PM   #1
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Cutting Board care

I just got 2 new butcher block cutting boards by a company named mountainwoods, (google it). They at least look like a Boos. Anyway when do I oil it, where do you find food grade mineral oil and should I sand the scratches out ?

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Old 10-15-2006, 11:16 PM   #2
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You can find food grade mineral oil in any drug store in the laxative section. It's the least expensive source. No need to pay more.

Oil it heavily before first use, leave it overnight and wipe it dry in the morning. Oil it an all sides and edges. Re-oil periodically when the board seems dry.

Light surface scratches are OK. If heavy scratches accumulate, sanding them is OK. t
Then you have to re-oil.
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Old 10-15-2006, 11:35 PM   #3
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If you want to REALLY get down to the nitty gritty warm the oil slightly and apply in the direction of the grain. This may take, for the most effective "seasoning", 4 - 6 coats waiting in between coats. If you do one coat in the morning, one at night, one in the morning, etc., that will be fine. Wipe off excess in between coats.

Like Andy said the best thing to use is a food-grade mineral oil, which is CHEAP! It will not go bad ever. Never use vegetable or corn or olive oil as it will turn rancid. If you use the butcher block often re-oil monthly.

If you have to sand because of deep grooves be sure and re-season using the warm oil again.

Since you are seasoning your cutting board do all of your wooden spoons/utensils too. It really helps keep them from splintering and lasting for years and years!!!

I've looked at those boards before online - they are beautiful!!!
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Old 10-15-2006, 11:55 PM   #4
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Well, in doing a search because I started doubting myself I ran across the very same information. Only this info said if you want to shave some bees wax in with your oil, then heat, it will help "harden" it even more - only a small amount of beeswax - 1/4 tsp! I never knew what mineral oil did other than "moisturizing" the wood but it actually seals the pores giving it a harder, smoother, finish.

Also, the info I found said that boards need oiling once a week to keep the finish hard and non-porous.
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Old 10-16-2006, 07:49 AM   #5
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No oil "moisturizes" wood. Wood is dead. As you see, the mineral oil seals the wood. And the addition of wax (it can be ordinary paraffin) is the way old time butchers treated their blocks.
I do not think it needs to be done as often as each week. And scratches do not need to be sanded out.
I have a cutting board counter and I cannot imagine having deep cuts. If that is the case, it is being used with a cleaver, and I would not recommend doing that. I had had my countertop for 30 years when I replaced the other counters. Took out the cutting board and had it sanded at that time before putting back in place.
In re-reading, I see these are boards. If a cleaver is going to be used, do it on only one of the boards. Or on a cheaper board than one that looks like a Boos.
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Old 10-16-2006, 09:25 AM   #6
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I'd be interested in knowing how your boards work out, Vilasman. I've been considering getting one for my kitchen, and Boos is probably not in my future.
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Old 10-16-2006, 02:24 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
Wood is dead.
I guess I need to quit watering mine!

NOTE - it was in " " (quotes) - "moisturizes" as in keeps it from drying out, splitting, prolongs the life, etc. Same end result I guess - I knew it certainly helped the life and care of the board - I never put that much thought into "sealing". I can assure you I knew the wood was DEAD!
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Old 10-16-2006, 04:17 PM   #8
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Actually I didn't mean that quite that way. It is pretty common in the "wood care industry" that if you read many wood "care" products they would have you believe that you can restore moisture/oils to the wood in your furniture. You can't. You can protect the wood FROM moisture with a finish on furniture or with the mineral oil in the case of cutting boards.
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Old 10-16-2006, 04:45 PM   #9
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If you didn't mean it "that" way does that mean I have to take back my smart aleck answer??

I understand now - it makes perfect sense. It's "sort" (note quotation marks ) of like seasoning stoneware - the more "greasy" things you cook it becomes more non-porous!
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