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Old 03-30-2006, 04:53 PM   #1
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Question Manttra pressure cooker

Hi Members, I just joined the group and this is my first post. I just purchased a new Manttra electric pressure cooker but know very little about that type of cooking. Is there anyone out there that has one of these type of cookers and can give me some pointers? It looks very intimidating. My hubby and I have been eating out a lot and I want to get back into making some good meals at home where I have control of our carbs etc. Looking forward to sharing ideas and recipes on good ole' home cooking again.

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Old 03-30-2006, 09:04 PM   #2
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I don't have any electric models. But the two different models that I have are both stove top models - Fagor & Kuhn Rikon.

Basically, they all pretty much operate the same way; You put your food in the cooker, add water and seasonings, put the lid on, turn it so that it locks on, turn on the burner or in your case, the electric control, wait for the pressure to come up, and when the control begins to jiggle, if there is one, you start counting down the cooking time from there.

Be careful not to let the cooker stay on longer than planned, or you could end up with overcooked food. They are fast, quick and efficient.

What actually happens inside is that all of the air is allowed to escape and is replaced with pressurized steam from the liquid, which helps cook the food super-fast.

Usually, the amount of pressure that builds up inside the cooker is about 15
psi (pounds per square inch). For instance, soaked dried pinto beans usually take about 45 minutes in the pressure cooker, as opposed to about 4 hours
being cooked in a regular pot.

Pot roast and stew beef takes about an hour or so instead of two or three hours cooked the regular way. Try something simple & easy first like beef stew. Keep it simple to your level, then slowly expand to bigger and better things as you become more comfortable with your unit.

But DO NOT try to defeat the safety features. Follow the instruction manual to the letter. And when you feel better aquainted, you can add more stuff to cook at you leisure. I hope this helps.


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Old 03-30-2006, 10:15 PM   #3
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I second Corey's caution to read the instructions and warnings that come with your pressure cooker. I have an electric pressure cooker and use it 4-5 times a week to prepare all manner of fare from beans and brown rice to stews and roasts.

One thing to be very careful about is not to fill your pressure cooker more than 2/3rds full so that there will be room for the pressure to build. Air can be compressed but liquid cannot. You will be cooking at about 248 degrees F. if your pressure cooker builds 15 psi of pressure. With an electric pressure cooker you don't have to worry about excess heat under your pot, but with a stovetop model you should be careful to cook at the lowest flame or power that will keep the pressure up. The food on the bottom of the pot can still burn if the flame is too high.

Be very careful with kids around a pressure cooker since the high heat and escaping steam can be hazards not present in regular stovetop cooking.

The pressure relief valve is a very important component of the pressure cooker. This valve can be clogged or fouled by foaming of certain types of foods (usually high protein foods). Foaming is common with beans, rice, pastas, etc. If the pressure relief valve is plugged the pressure could build to a dangerous level.

Visit www.missvickie.com for a good source of pressure cooking information.

There are also some great recipies in this discussion forum for pressure cookers. Use the search function to look for "pressure cooker" or "pressure cooking".
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Old 03-30-2006, 10:16 PM   #4
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Hi Corey, Thank you so much for the info. I'll take your advice and keep it simple and I will follow the instructions to the letter.
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Old 03-30-2006, 10:22 PM   #5
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Hi Aurora, Sure appreciate you replying to my post and I will check out the site you sent me. Can use all the support and info I can get. This cooker should come in pretty handy now that the weather is warming up and I won't have to add to the heat in the kitchen. So glad I found this forum.
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Old 03-31-2006, 02:05 AM   #6
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About all I can contribute is to reiterate the sage advice you have already been given:

1. READ and FOLLOW the instructions that came with your cooker
2. NEVER exceed the "Fill Line" marked on your cooker, or if it doesn't have one - 2/3 full.
3. NEVER try to defeat any safety features

I agree with Aurora - Miss Vickie's is a fantastic site for the novice pressure cooker for fundamental information and some good recipes ... you can also Google on "pressure cooker recipes" and find even more recipes.
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Old 03-31-2006, 02:46 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frogholler99
Hi Corey, Thank you so much for the info. I'll take your advice and keep it simple and I will follow the instructions to the letter.


You're welcome!!

Glad to help.

Actually, there IS a safety devices on the cooker's lid that will automatically release the pressure either upward or downward if the pressure reaches dangerous levels.

Just let the instruction manual be your guide and you'll be alright.
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Old 04-09-2006, 07:17 PM   #8
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Pressure Cookers

I have one but have never used it I AM SCARED TO DEATH OF THEM
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Old 04-09-2006, 08:13 PM   #9
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Try reading the owner's manual on how to use it. It should be safe to use once you do.


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