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Old 11-30-2007, 09:17 PM   #1
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Pots and pans for propane range

I have a new propane range and am finding it difficult to cook things on a low simmer. The lowest setting is not quite low enough to simmer things such as sauce, and stews, in general things that take hours to cook. My question is this...are there any pots and pans that would tolerate this and not boil my sauce/stews? I've tried cast iron, non-stick, and aluminum or steel pans, and they all seem to conduct heat in the same manner.

I'd rather use pots and pans, but would consider buying a slow cooker or crock pot, though I've never used either one. Thanks for any help you guys can offer.

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Old 11-30-2007, 09:34 PM   #2
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Hey Miss Amber! What was your old stove's fuel?
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:38 PM   #3
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Hi uncle Bob, my previous stove was electric, so it was much easier to control. Since I've moved, this house is hooked up with propane gas.
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:41 PM   #4
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When the stove eye is on its lowest setting,,is the flame completely blue or do you see yellow tips on the flame?
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Old 11-30-2007, 09:51 PM   #5
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The flame is blue I think, and we already tried dropping the gas level from the back of the range and it will go out if we try to go lower. Safety feature I guess. There is no pilot light for this stove btw, it's an electric charger.
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:08 PM   #6
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Well a pure blue flame just means the air/gas ratio is right, and you are getting a good clean burn! Pilot lights have been 'history' for a long time on Home model stoves. They all use electronic igniters now. So your stove is fuctioning properly....but too hot on it lowest setting. Maybe have a service technician check it out to see if the there is anything that can be done.

Now to your question about cookware, It sounds like you have tried just about everything. So I don't have any suggestions for you.

Oh, I don't suppose there is one eye on the stove that has a lower BTU output than the others...that would be good! You could use that eye for simmering. You manual would tell you if you don't know...
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:26 PM   #7
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If your stove does not have a low output precision simmer burner, you can buy a gadget that you put between the burner and the pot to cut down on the heat level so you can get the simmer you are looking for.

They are not very expensive (less than $10). It is two layers of performated metal with an airspace in between and a small handle.
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:42 PM   #8
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yes get a simmer plate or a flame tamer (are sold by both names) and very useful.
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:48 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410 View Post
yes get a simmer plate or a flame tamer (are sold by both names) and very useful.
I wholly endorse what Robo has said. I have a gas cooktop and, early on, had a problem with low temps and simmering. I bought a flame tamer and have had no difficulty after using it.

I don't remember what I paid for it...maybe $20 USD, but it has been a valuable tool.
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Old 11-30-2007, 10:53 PM   #10
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You can take one of the cooking grates off a burner that is not in use and "double up" on the one you are trying to simmer on. This will add some space and might be enough to get you to the temp you need. ONLY do this if it is stable though. If it is not stable then it is not safe.
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