"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-17-2016, 01:25 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,843
That's a beautiful set of pans. I just wanted to say that when I bought my first piece of good cookware, I was really surprised at how different, and better, cooking with it was. I hadn't realized how frustrating it was to cook with pans that heated unevenly and had hot spots. It became much more fun and I was inspired to learn more. I hope you have the same experience
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2016, 04:00 AM   #12
Master Chef
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 8,247
rodentraiser, you found a gorgeous set of pots and pans! Others have given great advise. Our daughter now has my Mom's Revere Ware that was earned by my Dad as service awards at work back in the early 1950's, but they are just the copper bottom variety. I grew up learning to cook on them, and always thought that a clean pot or pan, inside or out, contributed to the efficiency of the pan's performance. Besides, how can you not want to spend the extra minute or two to polish up the bottom to a mirror finish. If you polish them each time you cook with, them it takes no more time than that.

Just a point or two. The rounded-bottom "pot" on the left of your image? It might very well be the top of a double boiler. Set it into the saucepans to see which one it fits into - probably the large one. Also, since it appears to be copper in the interior, if you ever need to beat egg whites, use that piece. The chemical reaction between copper and egg white makes the eggs whip up fluffier.

As far as food stamps? Ground meat isn't always the best value. If you find chicken or fish at a good deal, buy it. If someone gives you "the look", you could speak up and say that it's a more healthful purchase and you're trying to improve your health. And about "cooking wine"? Bleh. It might work out better if you buy a bottle of reasonably priced wine wine to cook with, then freeze any extra in an ice cube tray.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
...I occasionally use a Brillo or S.O.S pad to clean the bottom...
__________________

__________________
... nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have... ~~~ LeBron James
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2016, 01:37 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,228
Revere ware

What you have is Revere Signature ware. Basically stainless steel pan clad clad with a copper exterior. IMO it performs more like SS than copper. This line was produced from the 60's or so till the mid 80's.

Care is simple. The interior can be treated like any stainless, and the exterior cleaned or not cleaned as you prefer. I use Wrights Copper Cream and fall somewhere in the middle as to how clean mine are kept. The lemon + salt works for some. I prefer the Wrights. I believe the copper is actually an alloy harder than pure copper as it takes a little more scrubbing than my copper cookware.

Yours appear unused. If so, be aware that this line came with a protective lacquer coating that must be removed prior to heat or you will have a sticky almost non removable mess on your hands. You can check by applying any lacquer thinner. It it becomes tacky, it has not been cleaned. A lot of this series was used only as decoration in coppertone kitchens and never cleaned. If yours is shiny be suspicious. Copper discolors if not coated.

The fish pan, AKA oblong skillet. I have one, and find that it does not heat evenly due to being a stainless oblong vs a round burner.
I've also never seen one that lies flat. My tin lined copper from Brooklyn Copper of the same age is much better.

The Zag pan is used over a double boiler arrangement and should not be overheated, Use a saucepan slightly smaller than the pan for a boiler.

Overall, this cookware is surprisingly good for what it is. You'll be happy with it.

The logo changed over time, particularly the date, and if you are curious, here is a good site to pursue:

http://www.revereware.org/info/id10.html
__________________
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2016, 01:48 PM   #14
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,228
Revere ware

I just looked at your label again. I think that was a special edition series made only 1 year. It's probably never been used.
__________________
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2016, 09:08 PM   #15
Sous Chef
 
rodentraiser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Puget Sound, WA
Posts: 655
Thanks for the info, Jim. This cookware has definitely been used, even if it looks new in the picture. You can tell by the sleeking on the insides of the pans.

And I guess it could be polished a little more. I made Swedish meatballs last night in the griddle pan because that was the biggest pan I had. Naturally, I tried to move the pan when it was full to center it more on the burner, but instead I just spilled some of the gravy down the side of the pan and all over the stove.

When I went to wash up the pan, I saw that where the gravy spilled on the side of the pan, it acted like a tarnish remover. Wait till I go to Chef John's site and tell him his gravy sauce for meatballs cleans copper.
__________________
rodentraiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2016, 09:18 PM   #16
Sous Chef
 
rodentraiser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Puget Sound, WA
Posts: 655
And thank you, everyone, for making me feel better about the food stamps. I'm on another site where most people needing to use welfare and food stamps are considered loafers and losers, so I am always jumping into the fray to defend those of us that do need them and don't fraud the system.
__________________
rodentraiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2016, 11:57 PM   #17
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Richmond, Va
Posts: 1,228
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
Thanks for the info, Jim. This cookware has definitely been used, even if it looks new in the picture. You can tell by the sleeking on the insides of the pans.

And I guess it could be polished a little more. I made Swedish meatballs last night in the griddle pan because that was the biggest pan I had. Naturally, I tried to move the pan when it was full to center it more on the burner, but instead I just spilled some of the gravy down the side of the pan and all over the stove.

When I went to wash up the pan, I saw that where the gravy spilled on the side of the pan, it acted like a tarnish remover. Wait till I go to Chef John's site and tell him his gravy sauce for meatballs cleans copper.
How shiny you want to keep your copper is up to you. It doesn't affect performance either way. Each time you polish you remove a little metal, particularly if you use an abrasive. Any acid will remove the tarnish. I've seen recommendations from lemon juice through the compound used for soldering copper. I prefer Wrights as easy, cheap, and readily available.
__________________
Bigjim68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2016, 03:36 AM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,029
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post


Fear not. If you could see the bottom of my pans, you would be asking yourself why I even keep them. They were a present. And I no longer care about the bottom. I don't cook on the outside or bottom of the pan, so I don't really care. Read my signature line. It says it all about my attitude towards life. As long as I keep my home clean and dusted, that is all that matters to me. The bottom of pans that need constant shining are the last concern in my life.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2016, 05:55 PM   #19
Sous Chef
 
rodentraiser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Puget Sound, WA
Posts: 655
I'm with you, Addie. Someone once asked a group of us how often we dusted our model horses. The answers ranged from, "Dust? What is that?" to "Dust protects the horses from fingerprints." I personally feel the dust looks like snow and occasionally I'll march my little horses across it to make hoof prints.

I will go on record here to say my kitchen is a little cleaner than that.
__________________
rodentraiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2016, 08:56 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,029
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
I'm with you, Addie. Someone once asked a group of us how often we dusted our model horses. The answers ranged from, "Dust? What is that?" to "Dust protects the horses from fingerprints." I personally feel the dust looks like snow and occasionally I'll march my little horses across it to make hoof prints.

I will go on record here to say my kitchen is a little cleaner than that.
I will be 77 in March. I still do my own housework. I certainly qualify for a homemaker, but prefer to do it myself as long as I can. I started housekeeping when you were expected to iron your sheets and pillowcases. And like the good wife I did. Then the family started to grow and grow. Five kids, two husbands later and guess what. I stopped ironing those sheets and pillowcases decades ago. And I never saw a reason any company should go into my bedrooms and check to see if I did iron them. Taking good care of my family was more important. Going to their baseball games, Girl Scout Leader, camping in the summer, attending PTA meetings, etc. These activities took time away from all that ironing. Deep house cleaning also took a back seat until the kids were leaving home, one by one. Even though I was working full time I was able to squeeze in time for commercial cleaning. Every time a commercial came on, I jumped up and cleaned something. You would be surprised how much you can clean in three minutes of commercial time.

I managed to keep the window sills clean of city grime, fingerprints off the light switches, etc. I had a new priority. Myself! Wow! What a concept. I don't care about the bottom of my pans. I don't cook my food there nor do I eat from there. As long as I give them a good scrubbing with a Brillo pad, I get them reasonably clean.

You know what? If you don't like my new attitude towards housecleaning, then don't come visit me. I will meet you in the park. Bring your own drink of coffee.

BTW, I spent almost five years living in Tacoma.

__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cook, cookware, copper

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.