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Old 08-05-2008, 07:19 PM   #1
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Canning okra

Do any of you can okra? Is there a recipe that is good for frying? I remember canning some years ago that had vinegar & water in it. I must not have liked it or I would have kept the recipe. What are your opinions on canning okra. Thanks.

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Old 08-05-2008, 08:30 PM   #2
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I've never canned it, but have pickled it & frozen it. I'm thinking if you didn't like it "canned" with vinegar years ago that you probably wouldn't like it pickled.
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Old 08-05-2008, 08:42 PM   #3
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Miss Abby....I have never "canned" okra. It freezes well, so I've just never tried.
Check out this link for canning tips!

National Center for Home Food Preservation | How Do I? Can Vegetables

Frying recipes are mostly pretty straight forward....Sliced okra, salt & pepper (cayenne too) dredge in corn meal and fry. Some use flour instead of meal...some use a mixture of the two. Others run the okra through a milk/buttermilk bath before breading. Each a little different...all good! There is another method I am currently trying to master...My grandmother, and my late MIL used it. It's still just okra, S&P, mealed, and fried, but not in a lot of oil...The end result does not leave you with each individual piece breaded and fried...It's hard to explain. When I get it down pat, I'll get back to you. Anyway...HTH Oh! have you ever tried okra dill pickles???
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Old 08-05-2008, 11:18 PM   #4
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The Ball Blue Book of Preserving has a pickled Okra recipe using a Boiling Water Canner or straight Okra in a Pressure Canner. Because it is so soft, cooking tends to turn it mushy, so freezing is a better choice.

Sorry, no recipes for fried Okra in my library.
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Old 08-06-2008, 11:44 AM   #5
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Thanks everyone. We have already made pickled okra. I don't like anything pickled but DH does. I like it frozen ok but since having a freezer malfunction & loosing a freezer full of food (more than once over the years) I think i will stay with canning this year.

I fry it occ like Uncle Bob does. I just slice, toss in meal with a diced hot pepper, salt & blk pepper & fry in a little olive oil until brown.
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Old 08-06-2008, 05:42 PM   #6
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If in the past you canned okra in vinegar, and it wasn't a pickled okra, then the vinegar was probably used to raise the acidity to make it "safe" for a using a boiling-water canner (?) - since okra is a low acid food. If that recipe was from before 1990 - it probably wouldn't be considered safe these days. But, since you didn't like it - I guess that recipe is really moot anyway.

You can can okra - if you have a pressure CANNER - NOT a pressure COOKER. For an explanation of why - read this.

While I understand your reluctance to trust your harvest of okra to the freezer - you might want to conduct a simple experiment to see if you really want to count on canned okra as the foundation for your fried okra. Go to the grocery store - buy a can of okra - and try frying it. For less than $1 you will know if you want to make the investment in canning - or take a chance on trusting your freezer.

If you decide you want to can your okra - this is the currently accepted safe method.
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Old 07-06-2009, 03:39 PM   #7
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canning okra

i was wondering if when you canned your tomatoes, if you could put okra in with it. would the acid in the tomatoes make the okra safe? i lived far away from my grandmother so when we would visit and eat stuff she canned and sent back home with us there was not an issue, but now that she has passed and i myself would like to can, i have no way of knowing how she did it. she may have had a pressure canner but she canned every year for 60-70 years.
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Old 07-06-2009, 04:04 PM   #8
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Tomatoes today are not acidic and okra is a low-acid vegetable so the combination would have to be pressure canned to be safe.

What most of our grandmothers' did years ago was not modern canning, but what is now referred to as "open kettle" processing -- just heating, quickly putting in to sterilized jars and putting the lids on. Unfortunately that process does not kill the bacteria spores it was learned, so is not used today.

To learn how to properly can foods you only need to get a current copy of the Ball Blue Book which sells for $5-$6.
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