"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-24-2006, 06:56 AM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 154
http://mrswages.stores.yahoo.net/mrswagpiclim.html

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=pickling+lime

I found it in the canning section at WalMart.
__________________

__________________
bevkile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2006, 07:05 AM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 154
Pickling Lime
Pickling Lime is Calcium Hydroxide. It's also called "food-grade Lime", because in making the Calcium Hydroxide the processors make sure that the process remains pure and doesn't introduce anything untoward (e.g. it's not done in rusty old bins).

Pickling Lime helps to improve the firmness of pickles by introducing calcium that reinforces the pectin in the vegetable being pickled. In using it, a vegetable such as cucumber is soaked first in water mixed with the pickling Lime, for up to a day, then rinsed thoroughly -- at least 3 times -- before the actual pickling process begins.

Because the Lime is alkaline, you have to get rid of it all, or it would neutralize the acidity that you are going to use to preserve the pickles with. People haven't always rinsed it thoroughly, though, leaving some alkalinity and lowering the pH of the pickling batch by neutralizing the acidity. On account of this, cases of botulism have been recorded, and for that reason it's not generally recommended to use this anymore. Some swear by using grape leaves instead to help with crunchiness instead of using Lime.

Don't substitute any industrial Lime, whether agricultural or lumberyard Lime, as that may contain contaminants.
__________________

__________________
bevkile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2006, 09:57 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: N. Bellmore
Posts: 106
Hi Ayrton,

I do have a very good recipe for bread and butter pickles.

Slice the pickling cucumbers thinly and place in a non reactive gallon jar. the recipe I have calls for a gallon of cukes. I am never sure exactly how much that is, but if I slice enough cukes to fill the gallon along with 2 onions and 2 red peppers, I use 1/4 cup course salt to sweat in the refrigerator for at least 3 hours. I have let it go for a day with no ill effect even though my recipe says 3. after draining and rinsing, the proportions for the brine are 5 cups vinegar, 5 cups sugar, 2 tblsp mustard seed, 1 1/2 tsp celery seed, 1 1/2 tsp turmeric, and 1/2 tsp clove. You bring the brine just to a boil, add the sliced vegetable without stirring and bring again just to a boil. Turn off the heat. I always can and process them. These proportions make about 6 pints.

Let me know if you try it.

Dina
__________________
DinaFine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2006, 09:59 PM   #14
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: N. Bellmore
Posts: 106
[quote=bevkile]Pickling Lime
Pickling Lime is Calcium Hydroxide. It's also called "food-grade Lime", because in making the Calcium Hydroxide the processors make sure that the process remains pure and doesn't introduce anything untoward (e.g. it's not done in rusty old bins).

Pickling Lime helps to improve the firmness of pickles by introducing calcium that reinforces the pectin in the vegetable being pickled. In using it, a vegetable such as cucumber is soaked first in water mixed with the pickling Lime, for up to a day, then rinsed thoroughly -- at least 3 times -- before the actual pickling process begins.

Because the Lime is alkaline, you have to get rid of it all, or it would neutralize the acidity that you are going to use to preserve the pickles with. People haven't always rinsed it thoroughly, though, leaving some alkalinity and lowering the pH of the pickling batch by neutralizing the acidity. On account of this, cases of botulism have been recorded, and for that reason it's not generally recommended to use this anymore. Some swear by using grape leaves instead to help with crunchiness instead of using Lime.

Don't substitute any industrial Lime, whether agricultural or lumberyard Lime, as that may contain contaminants.

[/Thank you for the info. I think I'll look for grape leaves]
__________________
DinaFine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2007, 03:38 PM   #15
Senior Cook
 
bandonjan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Southern coast of Oregon
Posts: 253
Ayrton -- I made these and they turned out well...

Bread and Butter Pickles
6 cups cucumbers, sliced
2 med. onions, sliced
1/4 cup salt (see notes)
2 cups vinegar (i used white)
2 cups boiling water
1 tsp mustard seed
1 tsp celery seed
1/2 tsp turmeric
2 1/2 cups sugar (see notes)
Mix cucumbers, onions and salt; let stand 2 hours. Meanwhile
combine vinegar, water, spices and sugar. Bring to a boil. Drain
and rinse cucumbers and onions and add to the boiling vinegar
mixture. Cook for 2 to 5 minutes depending on the crispness
you like. Put in jars and seal. Yield 3 1/2 pints

Notes: Orig recipe called for 1/2 cup salt but I found that to be
too salty. Orig recipe also doesn't rinse the salt off - again it
was too salty so I cut the salt in half and rinsed the cucumbers
to remove the surface salt and just let what penetrated be the
amount. Orig recipe called for 1 1/2 cups sugar and that didn't
seem to be enough against the salt so I added another cup. I
also found the cooking time of 5 mins too long. Chips were soft
and I like them a little crisper so I only cooked about 2 mins.

__________________

__________________
bandonjan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.