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Old 04-30-2012, 12:03 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful

I usually don't quote myself but this stuff lasted over a year, crunchy, white, excellent.

Gadzooks, I'm going to try to make it hotter like in your suggestion since I'm the only one that eats it much. I mostly just grab a few cloves when I need a pickle side to a sandwich or I'm making an anti-pasta plate.
Very cool! I love pickled garlic and will have to try this :)
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:21 AM   #12
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Me too! Wonder if one of the large ethnic markets around here carry rice vinegar in larger bottles? The supermarkets just have tiny ones.

Anyway - thanks for the recipe Gadzooks! :)
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Old 10-02-2012, 11:35 PM   #13
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Crunchyness of delicious pickled garlic

Earlier someone said-
"I'm not sure that hard necked variety or soft necked variety would make a difference if you are using them soon after harvest. If you used them later when they started to dry out--months later--it might be a factor."

Regarding crunchy pickled garlic:
Researching the fine points of garlic is a hobby of mine. Crunchyness is less related to pickling technique than to the kind of garlic used.

Hundreds of cultivars of hardneck heritage garlic exist. Some such as Georgian Fire garlic are so firm they remain crunchy after being sauteed with vegetables. The best time to buy fresh hardneck garlic from organic growers is around August and September. Look for growers in areas with very cold winters. Eastern Washington and Idaho are big producers of gourmet heirloom hardneck garlics. (A consolation for the cold winters we have here!)
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Old 10-05-2012, 10:46 AM   #14
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I have 4 or 5 pints of pickled garlic in the pantry (so far--more may be coming!)

I use two and a half cups water, two and half cups vinegar, 1/4 cup salt. Boil it, pour it over the peeled garlic in pint or half pint jars, waterbath for 5 minutes. Let the cloves stand for at least 2 weeks to develop the flavor. Add a chili pepper or some dill if you want.

I have never had olive bar pickled garlic, but the garlic cloves in my dilly beans were my favorite part of the jar, so this year, I eliminated the beans!!

I do recommend really fresh garlic--I grew my own. To easily peel, dunk cloves in boiling water for a minute. (I tried that two bowl shaking trick--it helps, but doesn't work so well with really fresh garlic.)
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Old 12-20-2013, 12:34 PM   #15
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Hope I'm not adding to this discussion too late but I noticed that the olives at our grocery store olive bar are bathed in an orange tinted oil and they have red chili peppers in the same container. I'm thinking the peppers give the oil it's color. But I'm wondering if they first pickled the garlic cloves and then added the oil. Probably olive oil. Does anyone have a recipe along those lines?
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Old 01-13-2014, 08:35 PM   #16
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My G/F insists that pickling garlic is dangerous. Which is a shame because I'd love to pickle caramelised garlic.
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Old 01-13-2014, 08:49 PM   #17
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Welcome to DC! Not sure if I'd pickle caramelized garlic, that I would freeze.

But I do agree with Sparrowgrass and others here, the garlic cloves in my pickled beans are great!
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Old 01-13-2014, 09:08 PM   #18
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Welcome to DC! Not sure if I'd pickle caramelized garlic, that I would freeze.

But I do agree with Sparrowgrass and others here, the garlic cloves in my pickled beans are great!
I imagined it would be nice caramelised brown,and pickled in olive oil?
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Old 01-13-2014, 09:26 PM   #19
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I imagined it would be nice caramelised brown,and pickled in olive oil?
We've had a number of discussions here about preserving garlic in oil, it should be fine if you use it within a week, and keep it in the fridge, otherwise you risk getting really sick. Pickling involves vinegar or some other type of acid, and/or salt, and then usually canning it. Putting something in oil isn't pickling. Please be careful!
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Old 01-13-2014, 09:33 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
We've had a number of discussions here about preserving garlic in oil, it should be fine if you use it within a week, and keep it in the fridge, otherwise you risk getting really sick. Pickling involves vinegar or some other type of acid, and/or salt, and then usually canning it. Putting something in oil isn't pickling. Please be careful!
Yes, that's what I meant by pickling which is why my G/F says its dangerous to do that. I wish I could preserve the flavour of caramelized garlic somehow. Perhaps freezing like you say, is the better option.
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