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Old 09-18-2010, 07:52 PM   #1
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Using French Jars for canning

Has anyone ever done any canning using french jars?

I haven't figured how to do a boiling water or pressure cooker type procedure for either. I think you need to heat the jar to push out the gasses but how do you do that with the top un-latched?

Any pointing to a site or book will be much appreciated.

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Old 09-18-2010, 08:43 PM   #2
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You might have better success with them in France. They are not USDA approved in the United States and you won't find any tested and approved recipes using anything other than the standard 2-piece lids and mason jars.

Of course if you like experimenting.......
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Old 09-19-2010, 08:42 AM   #3
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Bail type jars used to be common in the US some 60 years ago. They were used in hot water bath canning and the bails were locked down before the jars were submersed. The heat from the bath expanded the contents of the jars enough so that a vacuum was formed when the jars cooled after being removed from the hot water bath. This vacuum drew the glass dome down tightly onto the rubber gasket between the dome and the top of the jar. To access the contents of this type of canning jar, the vacuum seal is broken by pulling on the tab that is part of the rubber gasket.
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Old 09-20-2010, 11:26 PM   #4
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Thank you. This is useful and pretty much makes sense; they work like most any mason jar.
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Old 09-29-2010, 12:21 PM   #5
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Hi Robt.
I haven't been OnSite for a very long time. So long that I'm virtually a Newbie, but I had to comment on your question.
I'm a Brit living in France. I assume by French Jars you are referring to jars like Le Parfait or similar? (where the lid is held on by wire bands?)
I use these all the time now I live here.
Very safe to use.
A lot of my French friends re-use their rubber seals, but I prefer to use new ones all the time. That way I know they will seal every time. (if you can't get them where you live then try the Internet)
When canning I always put the seal on before filling the jars so I don't risk burning myself on boiling jams etc. Immediate on filling close the lid with the metal "straps". Continue as your normal method. When cold test for a good seal by opening the metal "staps" and lifting the jar by the lid. If sealed properly then the jar will lift with the lid. If it pops then put it in the fridge and use A.S.A.P.
If you have a good seal then it is safe to remove the "straps" and re-use them on other jars. Your sealed bottles wont open until you do it.
Good luck
Haz
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Old 11-14-2010, 03:54 PM   #6
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Haz, thx, it worked fine as it is nearly identical to jpbill's I bet that works too.

mcnerd, I checked the case jars of new Kerr and a Ball one to. No mention of USDA. Just as soon not have those folks in my kitchen anyhow.
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Old 11-15-2010, 06:45 PM   #7
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Robert, you don't want your meat inspected? You don't want anyone doing tests for pesticides? You don't want anything recalled when is it proved to be tainted? And you don't want research based recipes for home canning to keep you from dying of botulism?

Ok. No USDA in your kitchen, then.
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Old 02-25-2011, 03:09 PM   #8
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I just went out and bought four dozen Fido terina 200 ml jars [Bormioli] for the weekend project to make Marmalade with the 36 pounds of Seville Oranges I also bought.

200 ml is for all intents 7 oz. My thought was that is a good gift size as well as it just seemed that a pint or 500 ml was just to big. So what size would be correct for this type product? Oh these jars are Italian not French.
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Old 02-25-2011, 03:57 PM   #9
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Wife uses Ball 4 Oz & 8 Oz. 4 Oz is kinda dinky and expensive. To me the Ball 12 Oz. quilted crystal is the ideal compromise. The preserves we purchase come in 28 Ounce jars and we have no trouble finishing them off before they spoil . My preference is based on balancing the jar's cost per ounce of capacity with portion size. Unfortunately the quality of Ball's jars, dome lids, and bands seems to have declined since being taken over by Jarden Corp.
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Old 03-29-2011, 01:54 PM   #10
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How about the recipe for marmalade of Seville oranges. It sounds like a not-too-sweet marmalade like British Dundee. And you got the oranges in February? Super.
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