"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Chicken, Turkey & other Fowl
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-11-2006, 09:46 AM   #1
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
I had Pressed Duck!

There's a sizeable French expatriate community here and quite a good choice of French restaurants. We went to an excellent place (the first French resto established here) last week and had their house specialty -- Pressed Duck. I've never heard of this but it sounded fantastic from the way the French maitre d' so proudly described it. Apparently it's a famous traditional French classic and quite complex to prepare which is why very few restaurants even in France serve this today, according to him.

Anyway, we ordered it and it serves two people. They brought out a whole duck that was roasted brown but still very rare inside. After carving out the two breasts and legs, they placed the carcass vertically into a strange-looking brass apparatus that pressed the bones and flesh into juice (much like what a wine press does with grapes). They pan-fried the breasts while they simmered and reduced the carcass' juices into a rich thick sauce. The breasts were then served with this sauce. There were two options on the sauces -- with red wine or with truffles. We chose the truffles. The dish was simply outstanding. We were each even given a certificate (with serial number 19950) for having had this duck! This experience was so good I just had to share it with you.

I researched the web for Pressed Duck afterwards and Here is what I found about it's history. If or when you get the chance to taste this, go for it!

__________________

__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2006, 09:56 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
YT2095's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central UK.
Posts: 3,875
Send a message via MSN to YT2095
that sounds Great!

sadly I`ll have to stick to boiling the bones to make stock, I think I would have had the truffle option also, I`ve never tried them before and would like to.

I`m pleased you Did share this :)
__________________

__________________
Katherine Snow. xx
YT2095 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2006, 10:20 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
auntdot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,418
Oh, you mean the duck isn't alive when ...............

That explains a lot.
auntdot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2006, 10:40 AM   #4
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
Actually, before I heard the maitre d's description of this dish, I was imagining that the duck would be served flattened somehow ... I've seen flattened roasted ducks hanging from Chinese restaurant windows ...
__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2006, 10:43 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
YT2095's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central UK.
Posts: 3,875
Send a message via MSN to YT2095
Spatchcock(sp?) is a similar way to what you saw, usualy held flat position with skewers.

maybe that was it?
__________________
Katherine Snow. xx
YT2095 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2006, 10:38 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by YT2095
Spatchcock(sp?) is a similar way to what you saw, usualy held flat position with skewers.

maybe that was it?
Dunno YT. They were just flattened roasted ducks. Saw this in Hongkong. They looked very different from the normal Chinese roasted ducks. I'll try it next time I have a chance.
__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2006, 12:22 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
WOW - If I ever get the opportunity to have it I will - but I must say I think I have just seen a kitchen "gadget" I won't be buying!
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2006, 07:38 AM   #8
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 665
Sounds like duck a la mammogram to me ....
XeniA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2006, 07:53 AM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
so many bad jokes come to mind.

what was the duck pressed for? time? money? pleated pants?

so, chops, pressed duck was all it's quacked up to be?

sorry, haven't had tea yet this morning.

i'm gonna have to try this if i ever see it as a special. i love duck, especially with a red wine reduction.
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2006, 11:06 AM   #10
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrton
Sounds like duck a la mammogram to me ....
LOL!
__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2006, 11:29 AM   #11
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
what was the duck pressed for? time? money? pleated pants?
Uh, the duck couldn't pay his Bill?
(Hey, since we're talking bad jokes ... )
__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2006, 11:36 AM   #12
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Sounds awesome! I've never heard of that before.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2006, 11:47 AM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,947
If memory serves, Julia Child mentions pressed duck in her last book, My Life in France. With all the experimentation she put into Mastering the Art...., I'm pretty certain she had to have prepared it a number of times. Now there's a lady who had kitchen gadgets!!!
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2006, 10:37 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
Posts: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by YT2095
Spatchcock(sp?) is a similar way to what you saw, usualy held flat position with skewers.

maybe that was it?
From the American Heritage Dictionary:
spatch·cock (sp²ch"k¼k) n. 1. A dressed and split chicken for roasting or broiling on a spit. spatch·cock tr.v. spatch·cocked, spatch·cock·ing, spatch·cocks. 1. To prepare (a dressed chicken) for grilling by splitting open. 2. To introduce or interpose, especially in a labored or unsuitable manner: "Some excerpts from a Renaissance mass are spatchcocked into Gluck's pallid Don Juan music" (Alan Rich). [Perhaps alteration of spitchcock, a way of cooking an eel.]
akwx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2006, 11:04 PM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
Posts: 20
The Chinese Pressed Duck

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopstix
Dunno YT. They were just flattened roasted ducks. Saw this in Hongkong. They looked very different from the normal Chinese roasted ducks. I'll try it next time I have a chance.
There are actually two types of "pressed" duck in the Chinese cuisine:

The 1st type is what you saw in restaurants/BBQ houses. It's called the "Pipa Ap (duck)" as pronounced in Cantonese. The "pipa" (pronounced as pee-pa) comes from the shape of the traditional Chinese musical instrument called the Pipa. When the duck is cut open, it is spread-eagled with Chopstix to the shape of a Pipa, minced garlic, Hoi-Sin & oyster sauce are then used to marinate the duck. The Pipa Ap is then sun-dried for 3 hours before roasting.

The 2th type is what's called the "Laap Ap (duck)", simply a salt preservation process with air-drying, before being sold to consumers. The "Laap Ap" has a very aromatic flavor, and is usually cut into small pieces, to be cooked in water & long grain rice, as they're being simmered into steamed rice. Both the Laap Ap, and the flavored rice, are favorites of mine.
akwx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2006, 12:28 AM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
akwx, i've often heard that spatchcocking includes removing bones, not just splitting a bird open.
i've had spatchcocked quail and pheasant, aka semi-boneless, and the only bones left were in the legs and wing tips.
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2006, 12:49 AM   #17
Sous Chef
 
Lynan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 502
Send a message via MSN to Lynan
Ayrton, you get the pink ribbon from me for mentioning mammograms in the month of October...duck ones or not!!

Can someone remember which restaurant pressed duck was first presented? I know it was in Paris, and I think it was Tour something.

Edited to add: Got it! Google is great. Tour d'Argent. Yeah.
__________________
In the book of life, the answers are NOT in the back.
Lynan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2006, 01:05 AM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
Posts: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
akwx, i've often heard that spatchcocking includes removing bones, not just splitting a bird open.
i've had spatchcoked quail and pheasent, aka semi-boneless, and the only bones left were in the legs and wing tips.
If you're talking about eating Chinese BBQ Duck, pressed or otherwise, then you would be missing the best tasting part of the duck--the bones; wherefore is the seasoning?

I kno nothin' 'bout spatchcocking, or the likes. All's I kno's dat u needed a spell check.
akwx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2006, 01:44 AM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
sorry akwx, it appeared you knew something about spatchcocking, having posted a definition.

ok, corrected for spelling. i hate ergonomic keyboards. i'm not in my office tonight.

btw, wouldn't it be the "two types of pressed duck", not ducks.

and steamed, not steam rice.

glass houses, you know...
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2006, 02:16 AM   #20
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 665
Now, now boys, stop being snitty ... I do believe on this site "it's the thought that counts" rather than flawless typing.
__________________

XeniA is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×