"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy > Brownies & Dessert Bars
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-11-2019, 09:16 PM   #11
Executive Chef
 
JustJoel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 3,668
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
Have you made Dutch oven bread? Even my first attempt was a success (and I'm not a baker), and I have never had a failure.
+1! You just can’t mess it up!
__________________

__________________
Dance like no oneís watching, sing like no oneís listening, but cook like EVERYONE is eating!
https://justjoel59.wordpress.com
JustJoel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2019, 12:17 AM   #12
Head Chef
 
Josie1945's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Sunny Central Florida
Posts: 2,240
I have made bread in a jar many times, but it is
quick bread, not yeast bread. Banana ,apple ect.
Haven't made it in years. You use wide mouth jars .
As soon as you take them out of the oven you put
the lid on and they seal.

Josie
__________________

__________________
Practice Random Acts of Kindness ( RAK ) Makes you feel great too
Josie1945 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2019, 10:33 AM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 22,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josie1945 View Post
I have made bread in a jar many times, but it is
quick bread, not yeast bread. Banana ,apple ect.
Haven't made it in years. You use wide mouth jars .
As soon as you take them out of the oven you put
the lid on and they seal.

Josie
They may seal, but that didn't doesn't make them shelf-stable.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2019, 01:26 PM   #14
Head Chef
 
Josie1945's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Sunny Central Florida
Posts: 2,240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josie1945 View Post
I have made bread in a jar many times, but it is
quick bread, not yeast bread. Banana ,apple ect.
Haven't made it in years. You use wide mouth jars .
As soon as you take them out of the oven you put
the lid on and they seal.

Josie
They may seal, but that didn't doesn't make them shelf-stable.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018

GG I knew you would answer this way. I did not post a recipe
or tell anyone how to do, but I would if they PM me. My sister and
I did it for years we only made small batches and they never had
a problem.
I know you get your info from reliable sources. That is why so many
of the old traditions are not around anymore (reliable sources)

Josie
__________________
Practice Random Acts of Kindness ( RAK ) Makes you feel great too
Josie1945 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 03:07 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 9,293
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperhead212 View Post
Welcome to the forum!

With all of the bread I have made, and all the bread books I have, ....
Not sure about a "jar bead", but would really love to learn and become proficient in bread making. Would you care to start a thread about breads you make, technique you use. Basically a "master class thread" on bread making. The books I have I have I think are just too smart for me, or am too stupid for them. Need somebody explain to me in a simple, simple language.

Thank you in advance.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 03:27 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
JustJoel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 3,668
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Not sure about a "jar bead", but would really love to learn and become proficient in bread making. Would you care to start a thread about breads you make, technique you use. Basically a "master class thread" on bread making. The books I have I have I think are just too smart for me, or am too stupid for them. Need somebody explain to me in a simple, simple language.

Thank you in advance.
Do you have a Dutch oven? No knead Dutch oven bread is the easiest for people who are just starting out with bread. It’s no-fail, makes beautiful loaves every time.

DC has an entire forum on breads, with several sub-forums. You can find it here
__________________
Dance like no oneís watching, sing like no oneís listening, but cook like EVERYONE is eating!
https://justjoel59.wordpress.com
JustJoel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 05:23 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 22,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJoel View Post
Do you have a Dutch oven? No knead Dutch oven bread is the easiest for people who are just starting out with bread. Itís no-fail, makes beautiful loaves every time.

DC has an entire forum on breads, with several sub-forums. You can find it here
And you don't even need a Dutch oven to make it! I know they seem to be synonymous, but no-knead bread can be baked on a baking stone with a pan of water to create steam.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 06:02 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 20,376
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I read the suggestion, for no knead bread, that if you don't have a stone, use a big old cast iron skillet.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 06:49 PM   #19
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 22,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I read the suggestion, for no knead bread, that if you don't have a stone, use a big old cast iron skillet.
Yes, that would work, too. You need something that holds on to heat.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2019, 10:11 PM   #20
Senior Cook
 
pepperhead212's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Woodbury, NJ
Posts: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Not sure about a "jar bead", but would really love to learn and become proficient in bread making. Would you care to start a thread about breads you make, technique you use. Basically a "master class thread" on bread making. The books I have I have I think are just too smart for me, or am too stupid for them. Need somebody explain to me in a simple, simple language.

Thank you in advance.
Don't put yourself down, CharleyD - many bread books out there were written for advanced bakers, and with all of the references to gluten %, extraction %, starch damage, enzymes, pH, and other bread science, it can be intimidating starting out, for sure. Simply put, bread is one of those things that's easy to make, but difficult to master.

Something that sounds strange, but makes sense, after you think about it, is that the simpler breads - the white breads - are the ones that are the hardest to perfect. Getting the best flavor takes longer, multiple risings, as a rule. When I first started baking (in the 70s), most books had recipes to speed up the bread (with heat, and/or more yeast) which I found out early on, did not improve flavor. That no-knead method uses a long rise, with a small amount of yeast, and produces a good bread, but my favorites are still the ones with the pre-ferments, which are small portions of dough or batter, allowed to develop flavor, before using it to make the rest of the dough.

Things like rye bread are actually easier to make, in that you have a lot of other flavors in them -
A sour, or well fermented rye is good (sourdough, that's another thing!), and it's hard to get too sour, but even if it doesn't have much sour flavor, the other flavors will be there. You won't get a bland tasting homemade rye, unless you leave the salt out! This is something I learned by accident, early on - never leave the salt out of bread! It's like leaving the salt out of pasta water - we've all done it, and know it immediately upon tasting it!

The gluten is one aspect of the science of bread baking you need to know, and probably already do. This is what gives bread its elasticity, and high gluten (14%) bread flour is needed in pizza dough, as well as when you want to make rye bread, or other breads with low or no gluten flours. This is also good for those no-knead recipes - the higher gluten will be better activated, with the less movement of the dough.
All purpose flour has between 8 and 11% gluten, usually from 9-10%.

So what kinds of bread are you interested in making, CharleyD? And do you have a KA mixer, or some other brand with a dough hook? One thing that a mixer is best for is sticky dough. It's hard to knead a dough with high hydration by hand - it can be done, but it's messy!

Warning: it's easy to get addicted to homemade bread! Early on, I was making it to save money, when I was in school, but quickly learned how much better it was. I still haven't bought a loaf of bread since 1976! Well, I did buy some on the way over to my mother's a few times, but I told her I had to put a brown bag over my head, so nobody would recognize me. She didn't appreciate the humor in that.
__________________

__________________
Dave
pepperhead212 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bread, recipe

Bread in a jar Im just learning to make bread in a jar. My problem is when I take it out of the oven. Bread is spotty looks like its not done in spots. what could be my problem. I may not be asking the right ? After bread is cooled I take one out of jar it taste good. 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.