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Old 08-20-2012, 06:47 AM   #31
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Photo: Caesar Salad

Photo Courtesy: Madrid Capital Cordon Bleu Culinary Institute.

*** Panzanella Photo to follow shortly.
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Old 08-20-2012, 07:41 AM   #32
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haha, "stale bread mixed with stuff"....funny, Harry; made me chuckle.

Looking forward to the photo, Margi.
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Old 08-20-2012, 07:57 AM   #33
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haha, "stale bread mixed with stuff"....funny, Harry; made me chuckle.

Looking forward to the photo, Margi.
it made me gag soma! not my cup of tea as i said.....didn't like the consistency of the moist bread but the croutons helped i suppose.not keen on endive or raddichio either.....much prefer the sweeter/crunchier romaine in a caesar.my local costco has some american import huuuuuuge romaine's....beautiful
glad you had a chuckle soma....food/drink can be made much too much of a serious subject imo,it should be fun at all times,but that's just my take on the subject!
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Old 08-20-2012, 08:06 AM   #34
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Buon Giorno , Good Morning Soma,

It is very common for western Mediterraneans particularly to use day old bread in their soups, salads, breading for dredging and sauces.

These countries have a profound pastoral culture.

Have a lovely August.
Margi.
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Old 08-20-2012, 08:16 AM   #35
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it's also common in the british isles to use day old bread soma, as in bread & butter pudding,breadcrumbs for coating/frying & bread sauce for christmas lunch......seems to be a pretty global ingredient/technique to me
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Old 08-20-2012, 08:57 AM   #36
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For Photos of Panzanella Salads

Buonasera,

For those interested the following websites and links have distinctly varying versions, from traditional to vanguard of the Tuscan Salad:

1) www.chow.com/recipes/10638


2) www.foodnetwork.com/panzanella

3) www.allrecipes.com/recipe/panzanella-salad

4) Martha Stewart´s website has an unusual take on the recipe too

Best regards for a nice August.
Margaux Cintrano.
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Old 08-20-2012, 09:03 AM   #37
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I agree, Harry. The Romans and then the Byzantines took their cooking techniques everywhere their armies went and just substituted local ingredients, such as cabbage leaves for grape leaves. Mexicans use day-old tortillas to make chilaquiles (leftover tortillas fried and served with eggs, salsa and cheese) and tortilla soup.

Cooks Illustrated has a version of the panzanella salad that I really like. I'm not partial to soggy bread, either. Their recipe calls for salting the tomatoes, putting them in a sieve over a bowl, and letting the liquid drain for a half-hour or so. This concentrates the flavor of the tomatoes. Then they use the tomato liquid instead of water to moisten the bread cubes. I don't soak them, as the typical recipe says; I just toss them with a few tbsp. of the seasoned tomato water. It gives the salad much more flavor.
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:26 PM   #38
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I agree, Harry. The Romans and then the Byzantines took their cooking techniques everywhere their armies went and just substituted local ingredients, such as cabbage leaves for grape leaves. Mexicans use day-old tortillas to make chilaquiles (leftover tortillas fried and served with eggs, salsa and cheese) and tortilla soup.

Cooks Illustrated has a version of the panzanella salad that I really like. I'm not partial to soggy bread, either. Their recipe calls for salting the tomatoes, putting them in a sieve over a bowl, and letting the liquid drain for a half-hour or so. This concentrates the flavor of the tomatoes. Then they use the tomato liquid instead of water to moisten the bread cubes. I don't soak them, as the typical recipe says; I just toss them with a few tbsp. of the seasoned tomato water. It gives the salad much more flavor.
thanks gg now that sounds like it may work for me,makes complete sense to intensify the tomato flavour with salt AND use the liquid.....hadn't seen a decent panzanella recipe until you posted this one!
lets not forget the humble breadcrumb for binding minced(ground)meat either gg...i believe quite a few countries do that too.............
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:49 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by Margi Cintrano View Post
Photo Courtesy: Madrid Capital Cordon Bleu Culinary Institute.

*** Panzanella Photo to follow shortly.
Nice photo - from another source.

Back to Panzanella. Not a big fan of soggy bread in a salad (w/ tomato juice or otherwise). I do prefer the bread toasted/grilled or on a skewer; but then it's really not a panzanella - it's a salad w/ croutons.
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:56 PM   #40
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Cerise,

Yes, in my view, the skewer salad with croutons has our interest, and I really appreciate your suggestion. This shall look gorgeous for my younger daughter´s birthday 21st.

I am thinking about fresh fennel bulb for it as an addition, as it is one of our fave salad veggies. I have to take a serious look for the Market List.



Thanks again,
Margi.
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recipe, bread, salad, bread recipes, ethnic

Tuscan Panzanella Bread Salad :chef: Buon Giorno, Ladies and Gents, Bread Salad called Panzanella is very popular in both Tuscana and its neighboring province to the east, Umbria. It is simple to prepare and low fat. INSALATA ALLA PANZANELLA DI TUSCANA ... TUSCAN PANZANELLA BREAD SALAD ... :yum: 12 OZ. DAY OLD ITALIAN STYLE BAGUETTE 2/3 CUP EVOO 5 TBLSPS BALSAMIC VINEGAR 2 TBLSPS MINCED SPRING ONION 3 CUPS SLICED ESCAROLA 1 1/2 CUPS RADICCHIO 1/2 POUND CHERRY TOMATOES OR TOMATOES OF CHOICE 1 RED BELL PEPPER CUT INTO JULIENNE THIN STRIPS 1 GOLDEN YELLOW BELL PEPPER CUT INTO JULIENNE THIN STRIPS 1 SMALL CARROT, PEELED AND THINLY SLICED 1/2 CUP THIN SLICED CELERY 1/2 CUP ARUGULA ( ROCKET ) 1/2 CUP FRESH BASIL LEAVES 1. PREHEAT OVEN TO 400 DEGREES FARENH. 2. place the bread slices on baking sheet and toast until crisp, 10 mins. and Let Cool. 3. cut the bread into 1 inch pieces and place in medium bowl 4. add enough warm water to cover bread and let stand until the bread is just semi-soft about 1 minute 5. squeeze the bread gently to release excess water and transfer the bread to a large bowl 6. add 1/3 cup EVOO with 2 tblsps vinegar and the onion 7. season to taste with salt and freshly ground blk pepper 8. let stand 45 mins. 9. mix the escarola, radicchio, tomatoes, bell peps, carrot, celery, cucumber shredded, arugula and basil into the bread mixture 10. whisk the remaining Evoo 1/3 cup and the 3 tblsps of vinegar in small bowl 11. season with s & p freshly grated and pour dressing on salad and toss ... garnish with Reggiano Parmesano ... Enjoy with a crisp chilled Lambrusco, Rosé or Prosecco or Dry white wine ... Have nice Friday. :wink: Ciao, Margi. :cool: 3 stars 1 reviews
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