"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Health, Nutrition and Special Diets
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-08-2014, 09:11 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,863
It looks like the coupon books families received varied depending on the size and makeup of the family and the kind of work they did. I don't know how easy it would be to put together a list of what was available to an individual. Also from what I've read, some things, like oranges, were not available at all. http://www.ameshistory.org/exhibits/.../rationing.htm
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 10:09 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,041
Quote:
Originally Posted by menumaker View Post
I grew up in the 1950's learning how to cook from 5 aunts and my mum who were all smashing cooks. These women were inventive, shrewd and and fed families on practically no extras that we take for granted today. They would make tasty, filling and honest dinners. OK, so they weren't going to win 'Masterchef' but nothing ever seemed to faze them. I still have a weakness for homemade bread and strawberry jam or a roly poly pudding and custard. When I grew up and was a young mum and we were really hard-up I knew how to feed us well. All thanks to those wonderful ladies.
The best education is at your mother's side. Some of the best recipes written were found in Woman's Day magazine and others like them. And a lot of those recipes were taken and improved upon by mothers like yours.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 11:06 AM   #13
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,005
From what I have seen so far I would need to reduce my use of processed/rationed meat, fat and cheese. I think the limit was 2 1/2 pounds per person/week. I would also need to reduce or be careful with canned tomato products. I would have to pinch a little on the coffee, one pound every five weeks for each person over the age of fifteen. Eggs, chicken and fresh local produce produce were not rationed so I would be in good shape with that. It would get a little monotonous for me in the winter and early spring if I had to rely on only fresh carrots, squash, cabbage, onions etc...

It looks like we were in much better shape than the folks in England.

I would also be fine with the three gallon per week gas ration, that would be a tough one for many people today.
__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 11:19 AM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
From what I have seen so far I would need to reduce my use of processed/rationed meat, fat and cheese. I think the limit was 2 1/2 pounds per person/week. I would also need to reduce or be careful with canned tomato products. I would have to pinch a little on the coffee, one pound every five weeks for each person over the age of fifteen. Eggs, chicken and fresh local produce produce were not rationed so I would be in good shape with that. It would get a little monotonous for me in the winter and early spring if I had to rely on only fresh carrots, squash, cabbage, onions etc...

It looks like we were in much better shape than the folks in England.

I would also be fine with the three gallon per week gas ration, that would be a tough one for many people today.
Living so close to the sea, and having kids that would dig for clams and the fishing fleet just about four blocks from where we lived allowed my mother to save all her meat coupons until the end of the month and then it was feast time. We ate a heck of a lot of sea food and fish. To this day, I still love clams and other fish. But they are now priced out of my limit. And I am too old to go digging for clams. Along with the fishing fleet moving into Boston down on Northern Avenue, you almost have to have a security clearance to get on the dock. So that is out of reach also.

Sometimes for a treat, she would make me a cup of tea (she always got two cups out of one tea bag.) along with toast. Other times it was a cup of weak cocoa with evaporated milk. That tin of cocoa lasted for many cups.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 11:21 AM   #15
Sous Chef
 
menumaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: South West France
Posts: 588
This was a super series on BBCI hope this link works but if not, go to youtube and search; BBC Wartime farm episode 1, and take it from there. The Christmas episode was particularly interesting

wartime farm episode 1 - YouTube
__________________
Celtic cook

Life is like good wine.......best taken with friends x
menumaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 11:32 AM   #16
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: New Hampshire, USA
Posts: 160
Wonder if it was necessary

My father told me that during U.S. gas rationing, in the Air Corps they had an abundance and would even use it to clean parts on the planes. I wonder if a lot of the food rationing was the same thing i.e. government waste and ineptitude, mal-appropriation of resources by central planners, etc.
__________________
Stock Pot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 11:38 AM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,310
I watched the series on TVO. It was very enlightening. Farmers' contribution to the war effort was to eek more food out of their lands. This involved introducing more efficient means of farming. I complain about how much work it can be to harvest and preserve food. At least I have electricity and indoor plumbing!
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 12:07 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,041
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I watched the series on TVO. It was very enlightening. Farmers' contribution to the war effort was to eek more food out of their lands. This involved introducing more efficient means of farming. I complain about how much work it can be to harvest and preserve food. At least I have electricity and indoor plumbing!
Farming is not the easiest job in the world. And under war conditions is was even more difficult. Almost everyone is this country had Victory gardens. And for those that didn't could go to the Community gardens. They would take an empty lot where once a house or building stood and till it for farming. They were all over the city here. We may not have had a lot of meat, but we sure had plenty of vegetables. And some of them had greenhouses so there were veggies available for winter.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 12:53 PM   #19
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,883
I was born in the dead of winter on a farm in Minnesota in 1943. My mother hoarded gas stamps, determined it would be her last winter there. When she finally had enough, she told my Dad she was going home to California with me and hoped he would come too, and he agreed. Atta girl Mom...you've always been my hero.

Because they had a farm at the time (a pump in the sink, no electricity) she never said much about rationing, except for gasoline.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 01:35 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,310
I know my mom used to talk about all the ways my grandma could stretch a head of cabbage and tomatoes to feed them for a week. Of course, grandma made her own bread and had laying hens. During the winter, my grandma's canned tomatoes were front and center almost every meal during the depression. It was only my mom, grandma, and grandpa. My mom's brothers were 10 and 12 years older and were not living at home...they both ended up in Hawaii after Pearl Harbour.
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.