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Old 04-28-2010, 12:31 AM   #11
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Before we get into any discussions on how well pork should be cooked, let's see what an authoritative reference can tell us.

https://health.google.com/health/ref/Trichinosis

That should settle that.

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Old 04-28-2010, 01:01 AM   #12
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The CDC has some interesting info as well Trichinellosis Fact Sheet | Division of Parasitic Diseases | CDC

And so does the USDA Trichinae Fact Sheet

And... they don't seem to agree either :)

The second link details how long you have to maintain a specific temp to be safe.
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Old 04-28-2010, 08:17 AM   #13
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i should have been more clear, not thinking that the trichinosis thing would come up.

most of the meat i buy has been frozen for long enough to make it safe. also, cooking to a temp of 135 will have some carry over, so that should also make it safe enough to consume.

yes, there still is an extremely slight chance of getting sick, but if i lived my life in the shadows being afraid of every little chance of disaster, i wouldn;t be a happy puppy.

all in all, heffey's warning about the elderly and young is well heeded. thanks.
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Old 04-28-2010, 10:11 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heffey de Chefey View Post
You should cook pork to 150 degrees to kill any trichinosis that may be present. This will unlikely make most of us sick but children and the elderly have weaker resistance and could prove fatal.

150 will still allow you to have a slightly pink middle and maintain a juicy bite.
sorry, Heffey, I disagree about 150 for pork. There is nothing pink in the middle, and it is dry, dry DRY at that temp, and it is unnecessary to cook it so long with today's pork.

For any large cut of meat, it's good to pull it at least 10 degrees short of where you want it to be for service, as the meat continues to cook from residual heat for quite some time after you remove it from the oven.

Anyone wishing to verify this fact should employ a digital meat thermometer probe and leave it in after removing the meat from the heat source and just watch the probe as the temperature goes up and up.
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Old 04-28-2010, 10:24 AM   #15
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This extract from the USDA link Janet posted show just how careful govt. agencies are. 131F does the trick but, just to be safe...

Cooking - Commercial preparation of pork products by cooking requires that meat be heated to internal temperatures which have been shown to inactivate trichinae. For example, Trichinella spiralis is killed in 47 minutes at 52° C (125.6° F), in 6 minutes at 55° C (131° F), and in < 1 minute at 60° C (140° F). It should be noted that these times and temperatures apply only when the product reaches and maintains temperatures evenly distributed throughout the meat. Alternative methods of heating, particularly the use of microwaves, have been shown to give different results, with parasites not completely inactivated when product was heated to reach a prescribed end-point temperature. The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations for processed pork products reflects experimental data, and requires pork to be cooked for 2 hours at 52.2° C (126° F), for 15 minutes at 55.6° C (132° F), and for 1 minute at 60° C (140° F).

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends that consumers of fresh pork cook the product to an internal temperature of 71° C or 160° F. Although this is considerably higher than temperatures at which trichinae are killed (about 55° C or 131° F), it allows for different methods of cooking which do not always result in even distribution of temperature throughout the meat. It should be noted that heating to 77° C (171° F) or 82° C (180° F) was not completely effective when cooking was performed using microwaves.

Freezing - Experiments have been performed to determine the effect of cold temperatures on the survival of T. spiralis in pork. Predicted times required to kill trichinae were 8 minutes at -20° C (-4° F), 64 minutes at -15° C (5° F), and 4 days at -10° C (14° F). Trichinae were killed instantaneously at -23.3° C (-10° F).

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Code of Federal Regulations, requires that pork intended for use in processed products be frozen at -17.8° C (0° F) for 106 hours, at -20.6° C (-5° F) for 82 hours, at -23.3° C (-10° F) for 63 hours, at -26.1° C (-15° F) for 48 hours, at -28.9° C (-20° F) for 35 hours, at -31.7° C (-25° F) for 22 hours, at -34.5° C (-30° F) for 8 hours, and at -37.2° C (-35° F) for 0.5 hours.

These extended times take into account the amount of time required for temperature to equalize within the meat along with a margin of safety.



I test pork at several locations around the thickest part of the item and take it out of the oven at 140-145 F. I let it rest then serve. It is slightly pink.

I will not intentionally cook pork to 150F or higher. It's just not necessary. If you're cooking a loin cut, it's going to be dry.

I was unaware of the effect of freezing. That being the case, I could safely eat it raw.
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Old 04-28-2010, 11:31 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heffey de Chefey View Post
That is an awesome flavor combination with acorn squash.
I would stay away from the "fake" maple syrup which is basically just corn syrup and maple flavoring. Try to find some real maple syrup and blend it with the garlic then brush it over your squash (cut in wedges) and sprinkle with brown sugar and kosher salt. Bake in a moderate oven and brush a few times during cooking. More of a fall season item but inspiration knows no season.

If it were me, I would put a bit of orange juice in the sauce along with orange zest sprinkled over with the brown sugar. Didn’t want to intrude on your vision though.
That sounds devine WITH the orange juice and zest added!!!! I have just the orange sitting at home waiting to be used, too!
Acorn squash... I've never tried it, but I think I will! I wonder how that would taste with sliced yams....
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Old 04-28-2010, 11:34 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
Before we get into any discussions on how well pork should be cooked, let's see what an authoritative reference can tell us.

https://health.google.com/health/ref/Trichinosis

That should settle that.

Seeeeya; Goodweed of the North
These are awesome tips guys, thank you for posting them! (All of you! )
Somewhat related: I think it's safe, if I'm always making sure there's no pink in my meats hahahah... Not anything wrong with a bit of pink in some meat, but I just don't like it... (I know, I know... I've been told that I don't know good steak unless it's still bleeding -ew-, but oh well!)
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Old 04-28-2010, 11:40 AM   #18
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So back to the OPs question.... I once had some smoky candied garlic cloves served on chevre and crackers and/or pear slices. Maybe you could do something like this?
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Old 04-28-2010, 02:06 PM   #19
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I don't really use a recipe, but I brown chicken thighs, add as many cloves of garlic as I feel like peeling (10+), some chili paste or sriracha or red pepper flakes and a couple glugs of real maple syrup. Put in enough water to cover the thighs halfway, cover and cook til the thighs are tender. The garlic cloves will be soft enough to mash into the sauce. Serve over rice with some steamed broccoli or asparagus on the side.
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Old 04-28-2010, 02:36 PM   #20
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lol @ glug.

is that like a liquid measure for heaping pinch?
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