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Old 06-04-2016, 10:00 AM   #1
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Better bread rise

I tried making bread today for the first tiem since actually learning correctly how to knead dough (I had no idea about the folding!). It came out great, but a bit flatter than I had hoped.



Does anyone have any tips on making it rise even higher? I think it's probably because the dough was wetter, so it seemed more inclined to spread out a bit than puff up, but I don't really want to use less water as I was happy with the structure of the bread inside. Are there any shaping techniques which would work?

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Old 06-04-2016, 10:31 AM   #2
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When you're working with a wet dough, I think the only solution is to bake it in a loaf pan, or a three-quart Dutch oven if you're using the no-knead method.
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Old 06-04-2016, 01:59 PM   #3
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You can put it in a cuff of foil clipped together with metal-only paper clips to the size you want, although some may ooze out the bottom. You can also use just the ring of a springform pan to keep it from spreading out. I've done both, that's how I know about the ooze. You can also use a tall (3") cake pan in the size round you want. Wouldn't use a short cake pan as it's liable to flop over the sides.
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Old 06-04-2016, 02:49 PM   #4
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You can also use a tall (3") cake pan in the size round you want. Wouldn't use a short cake pan as it's liable to flop over the sides.
Yes, that's a great idea. My recipe for focaccia calls for baking it in a cake pan.
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Old 06-04-2016, 09:57 PM   #5
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Depending on how serious you want to get about bread, I was on this forum for a while and I learned a ton about breads and baking.

The Fresh Loaf | News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

I was told there are a lot of things that affect your bread making that people don't even know about. For instance, I heard not to use iodized salt and to make sure that you use purified water, because the chemicals in your tap water can affect how the bread rises and tastes.
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Old 06-05-2016, 07:49 PM   #6
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How about tell what you did, i.e. Recipe so we can try to figure out what's going on.


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Old 06-06-2016, 05:58 AM   #7
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How about tell what you did, i.e. Recipe so we can try to figure out what's going on.


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Pretty much did, wet dough, not contained, so it spreads out instead of up. Said was happy with texture. That's why GG and I gave options for containing it so it rises up only. Some bread doughs you want a bit wet/very soft and they have to be contained or they'll spread out.
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Old 06-06-2016, 09:43 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suthseaxa View Post
I tried making bread today for the first tiem since actually learning correctly how to knead dough (I had no idea about the folding!). It came out great, but a bit flatter than I had hoped.



Does anyone have any tips on making it rise even higher? I think it's probably because the dough was wetter, so it seemed more inclined to spread out a bit than puff up, but I don't really want to use less water as I was happy with the structure of the bread inside. Are there any shaping techniques which would work?
The texture looks good so I wouldn't fiddle with the ingredients.

I'm with GG on this - How about baking in a loaf tin/pan?
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Old 06-06-2016, 01:36 PM   #9
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I will have to try it in a loaf tin next. I have one that I have never used, so I should give that a go. Thanks for the tips everyone; glad to know it's not actually something I'm doing wrong :)
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