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Old 11-15-2008, 03:42 AM   #1
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Question If I have kneaded the bread in the food processor...

is it possible that I don't even need to knead it on the bench? Today I used my Magimix to knead again (I've done it the last few times, and I use the special plastic dough blade), and instead of kneading it further after 'processing' it for a couple of minutes, I just put it onto a floured surface and lightly kneaded it into a ball shape. I then put it into a greased bowl as usual for the first rising, and right now it has been knocked back and is rising in the loaf pan, about to be put in the oven.

Last time, I kneaded it for 5 or so minutes after processing it in the FP, but the loaf was just a tad denser than I like it. Overall it was still pretty good, but the time before the dense one the FP produced a REALLY fluffy loaf that I was extreemely happy with.

Does anyone else not bother kneading it further after using the food processor? I'll let you know how this loaf turns out when it's baked, in half an hour or so. Stay tuned

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Old 11-15-2008, 03:57 AM   #2
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Exclamation Oh no....it deflated a bit!!!

Oh no! It has deflated in the oven!...just a tad

What happened?

It had risen to about an inch above the loaf tin, so I thought it was ready. Was I wrong? Should I have left it longer? Did I leave it too long? It's still about 3/4 inch above the tin, but all flat on top
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Old 11-15-2008, 06:38 AM   #3
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Hopefully Katie E will see this. I believe she uses her bread machines to knead exclusively and does the baking in her oven. I've wondered when you take the bread out and what you do with it if you were going to transfer it to a regular bread pan to bake. At what point.
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Old 11-15-2008, 06:40 AM   #4
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If you're baking in a loaf pan, try using a wetter dough and bake some 10 to 15 minutes longer.
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Old 11-15-2008, 06:45 AM   #5
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oops, for get my post. Somewhere between reading your subject line and reading your post I forgot you said you were using a food processor
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Old 11-15-2008, 04:02 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
If you're baking in a loaf pan, try using a wetter dough and bake some 10 to 15 minutes longer.
The trouble was that it deflated in the first 10 to 15 minutes, so baking longer wouldn't have made any difference IYKWIM. I do remember seeing a thread here about this kind of thing. I might have to do a bit of searching.

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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
oops, for get my post. Somewhere between reading your subject line and reading your post I forgot you said you were using a food processor
That's ok, I think the result would be similar with bread machine and food processor, in that the kneading action is similar.
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Old 11-15-2008, 04:05 PM   #7
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Oh, and I should add that the texture of the bread was nice, it wasn't too dense or crumbly, it was nice and springy.

I'm just a little stumped on what happened to make it go flat on top
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Old 11-15-2008, 04:21 PM   #8
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Sparky.
your bread might have risen to much the second rising, I've had that happen. If you bake it then, it will deflate..I'd punch it down, give it a quick second rise in the pan and then bake..Just don't let it get to much above the rim of the pan.
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Old 11-15-2008, 04:30 PM   #9
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Sparky.
your bread might have risen to much the second rising, I've had that happen. If you bake it then, it will deflate..I'd punch it down, give it a quick second rise in the pan and then bake..Just don't let it get to much above the rim of the pan.
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Yes, it is possible that I left it there just a bit too long. It was only in there about half an hour, but the second rising was much slower than the first one in the bowl.

I've had loaves in the past that rose even more than that, and they didn't deflate, but I guess each one is different depending on the temperature/conditions in the room.

Thanks
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