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Old 10-31-2011, 12:29 PM   #11
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The other problem with salting "as you go" is that if you are making a sauce that requires a reduction, you can end up with something that tastes too salty when it's finished. I don't see a problem per se with seasoning a little as you go, but I would rather under-salt and then "correct the seasoning" at the end before serving.
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Old 10-31-2011, 01:11 PM   #12
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Having cooked for years for my mom (she's been on a low-sodium diet almost since I can remember), I tend to go light on the salt, leaving it to the end or for each person to add. I just thought two twists of the salt grinder was a lot, considering there were about 6 different veggies and salt added after each one was added to be sauteed...
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Old 10-31-2011, 01:19 PM   #13
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Layering means something entirely different to me. The addition of additional flavors is often called layering, be it herbs and spices, or veggies, or sauces, or whatever. This Each flavor added to the dish must complement the other ingredients, or enhance them. This creates complex flavor combinations on the palate that give us the end result we are looking for.

For instance, adding a touch of rosemary to a beef gravy adds another element, or layer of flavor.

over the years, I've taught myself to deconstruct, or identify the indevidual flavors in my mouth and sinuses, so that I can often recreate foods that I've tasted outside of my own home. This has also given me a wide base of flavor knowldege to draw from when experimenting, or creating a new recipe.

Layoring is just a convenient term that describes the act of adding complimentary flavors to a food, and can pertain just as easily to an actual layerd food, such as a parfait, or multi-layerd jellow, as it can to a rich marinara sauce, or a braised leg of lamb.

In the world of technology, we call these terms, jargon.

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Old 10-31-2011, 01:34 PM   #14
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I put salt like 2 to 4 times during cooking, not all at the same time, but I don't put it after each ingredients either...
It depends what you cook, you cook meet, you season it, then you add vegetables, you season it again, then you will add a sauce with tomatoes and mushroom, one more hint of salt... At the end it's not that salty but you can distinguish each ingredient pretty well.
If you put all the salt at the end, it mostly tastes salt, not the ingredient... That's my taste anyway...

For the tomato, I use can tomatoes for sauce, I don't add sugar, but water, light cream and herbs, sometimes olive oil
I never had an acidic problem, I just season it and taste it, when diluted in some cream/milk or water, the taste is less strong...
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Old 10-31-2011, 02:21 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
The other problem with salting "as you go" is that if you are making a sauce that requires a reduction, you can end up with something that tastes too salty when it's finished. I don't see a problem per se with seasoning a little as you go, but I would rather under-salt and then "correct the seasoning" at the end before serving.
I'm with you. I've learned the hard way to salt at the very end of cooking.
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Old 10-31-2011, 04:04 PM   #16
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I could never imagine (chemically) that adding salt with each flavor is going to have any effect except to possibly allow one to correct along the way. Salting at the end is going to have every possibility to produce the same final flavor - but of course adding too much at that stage is going to be hard to correct.

Adding a bit at a time can also result in over-salting - depending on the time scale of adding - because one will become accustomed to the increasing salt level as you go along - much as one will end up with hotter bath water if you add hot while in the tub - rather than getting into a ready-drawn full tub.
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Old 10-31-2011, 09:45 PM   #17
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I've been salting as I go, as a matter of blind habit. Yes, sometimes, I mess up and the final dish gets over-salted, but I'm pretty good at restraint. When I watch TV chefs, I'm always a bit taken back by what looks like a showering fistful of salt they use. In contrast, I usually use less than "a pinch," as I "layer."

An answer to this question would help me understand... when you salt something as you're cooking, doesn't some/most of the sodium chloride get absorbed into the food, or is it just an exterior coating (that uselessly washes off, if say, you add chicken stock)?
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Old 10-31-2011, 09:51 PM   #18
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I take anything I see on the TV, read in a magazine or read online with a grain of salt.

I salt to my taste, which is very little, those I cook for can finish the job at the table. I do salt as I go, but never saw it a layering flavor.
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Old 10-31-2011, 09:53 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Actually, I read s/where that because of all the manipulation with tomato hybrids, today's garden variety tomatoes are more acidic than the heirloom varieties and have as much as 200x sodium than the heirlooms had.
Quite the contrary, the acid has been bred out of consumer grade "bulk" tomatoes. The acid levels are low enough now that the FDA considers them (sliced tomatoes)potentially hazardous. The ph level no longer inhibit pathogen growth.
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Old 10-31-2011, 09:56 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
The other problem with salting "as you go" is that if you are making a sauce that requires a reduction, you can end up with something that tastes too salty when it's finished. I don't see a problem per se with seasoning a little as you go, but I would rather under-salt and then "correct the seasoning" at the end before serving.
This pretty much sums up what I was gonna say.

I think when building a pot of soup, seasoning as you go is crucial. Doing a Stock to make demi or something, salt at the end.

I guess reduction is the deciding factor in salting as ya go.
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