"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-04-2005, 02:31 AM   #11
Master Chef
 
luvs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: da 'burgh
Posts: 9,673
cyberian, peanut butter, namely the all-natural stuff without the added oils, is great for you. it has lots of good fats, is loaded with protein, and has lots of viamin e, niacin and fiber. the cheap brands like jif and skippy are not so very good for you; they have hydrogenated oils added. go for the stuff on the organic foods aisle, or make your own. use a neutral-flavored oil if you do make your own. but, like jkath said, you'll have to chill it.
vegemite is a very good spread for toast. it's low-calorie and loaded w/ b-vitamins. if i'm not mistaken, it's the highest source of b-vitamins availablw in any food item. you use just a DAB of the stuff, but you have to put butter on the toast first. although my Grandma, rest her soul, used to keep her butter out in a butter dish, and it was always fine.
__________________

__________________
i believe that life would not be complete sans comfy 'ol tee-shirts, the Golden Girls, and the color pink
& rock on, PITTSBURGH-
luvs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 06:40 AM   #12
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 40
Jellies and jams require refridgeration...

I got a jar once and it started molding in a few days.
__________________

__________________
cyberian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 11:19 AM   #13
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
Honey is sweet, but has beneficial factors. Anything that is natural does. It's the processed stuff you have to worry about.
As for butter, it can be kept out, as long as it's in a butter bell, which is a little crock that also holds water (you change the water every couple of days) that makes a seal to keep it fresh.

Best advice: Read. Read all labels. If a product needs refrigeration, it will say so on the label. Also, those little dorm-size fridges aren't very expensive, and they will hold a lot of food.
__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 12:19 PM   #14
Senior Cook
 
oldcoot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: USA,California
Posts: 487
cyberian, by sugar do you mean sucrose (white table sugar) or any of the other of the many natural sugars? Glucose, your blood sugar, is essential to keep you running - it's your "fuel". Without it, everything stops and you're dead. It is converted from the various sugars and starches in ALL foodstuffs = you cannot, and should not, avoid them.
The refined sucrose sugar has received a bad rap - it is a pure plant sugar, and nothing about it is harmful IN MODERATION, like everything else.
__________________
oldcoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 12:32 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
My mother always kept her butter out except in really hot weather, when it tended to turn rancid from the heat.

If your jelly gets mold on top, just scrape it off. There's too much sugar in the jelly for it to spoil. The bacteria are smarter than we are in that respect. Same way with cheese...just trim off the mold.

Our grandmothers didn't have the luxury of roomy, efficient refrigeraters, and let many things set out that would make us very leery. A lot of lunches were eaten from leftovers that had been left out on the stove from the night before. I don't know what kept people from dying of food poisoning...they must have been tougher than we are.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 12:38 PM   #16
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
Constance, I think it's the same theory as "don't drink the water in Mexico". Those who live there are able to, yet we aren't. It's what we've developed resistances to, wouldn't you think?

You know, that would make for good reading...you know, what folks ate without the use of a refrigerator, and the like. I imagine those in snow country must have considered the snow a luxury!
__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 01:20 PM   #17
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
I agree, Jkath.
My dad's mother was an Amish lady, married to hard-workin', hard-drinkin' Scots-Irish farmer in Iowa. She grew the vegetables, he grew corn and potatoes.
Of coursed refrigeration was no problem in the winter...they slaughtered in the fall and hung the beef in the upstairs spare room (to keep the animals out of it)...and it stayed frozen. She canned her pork the same way she did her produce...over a wood fire outdoors, in big copper kettles with straw in the bottom to keep the jars from breaking.
The canned goods, sauerkraut, pickles, potatoes, apples, etc. were stored in "the cave"...a combination storm cellar and storage facility.
In the summer, though, they chilled their milk, butter, cottage cheese and the like in the deep well. They ate a lot of chicken then, and dad said grandma could wring a chickens neck with the flick of her wrist.
It was his job to pluck the chickens and singe off the pin-feathers, and for the rest of his life he hated "grass-hopper chickens". If he came through my kitchen door and I was boiling a chicken, he'd just turn around and leave.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 03:00 PM   #18
DC Grandma
 
Dove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: USA,California
Posts: 3,217
This is the was my DH grew up except for the drinking part. They didn't have a ref. until he joined the Navy. (No electric and the bathroom had a half moon on the door...) Her stove was in the house and she cooked on it even though when DH sister moved from N.C. to Ca. she stored her electric stove there right next to the wood burning stove and by that time they did have electric but she still used her old stove.
When DH was stationed in Florida and in N.C. we would gp visit and boy was it hot in the kitchen!!
Dove
__________________
May I always be the person my dog thinks I am.

Walk towards the Sunshine and the Shadows will fall behind you!
Dove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2005, 06:53 PM   #19
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Non-perishable spread

Back to subject, This may be what you've been looking for, Cyberian.

PEANUT BUTTER BREAKFAST SPREAD

Ingredients:
3/4 c. chunky style peanut butter
2 tbsp. honey
1/2 c. finely chopped dried fruit (such as raisins, dates, apricots, figs, prunes, or apples)

Directions: Blend together peanut butter and honey; stir in dried fruit.
Store at room temperature in a tightly covered container.
Makes 1 1/2 cups spread.

*I know regular peanut butter has a lot of added sugar, but that's what keeps it from spoiling. I don't know anything about the health-store type, but if that's what you want to use, I'd only buy a little at a time if I were you.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2005, 02:55 AM   #20
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
For the specifications you stated - healthy, nutritious, store it on the shelf after opening, etc. - PEANUT BUTTER as others have said. While it doesn't really "spoil" after being opened it will, in time, go rancid because it has peanut oil in it.

Sugar isn't always a bad thing. A peanut butter sandwich with a little drizz of honey is good for you (well, skip the honey if you're under about 2-years old, really old, or have an immune diffecience disease like HIV/AIDS).

If you really want to know about peanut butter - go here and read a little: http://www.peanutbutterlovers.com If you want to know if a brand of peanut butter on the shelf at the supermarket has sugar in it ... READ THE LABEL! Some have added sugar - some don't.

Other alternatives would be single serving sized canned meats - like potted meat. A sardine sandwich isn't bad, etc.
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.