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Old 09-15-2009, 05:28 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
MsMofet, the use of cottage cheese is a poor man's substitute for ricotta, which is the cheese of choice used in making lasagna. While cottage cheese has a similar appearance to ricotta, any similarity ends there. The flavor of ricotta is superior in every way, as you already know!

And I believe you are right when it comes to not finding it in any normal Italian Spaghetti recipe. Just for curiosity, I consulted with a life-long friend, M. Cappitelli, a Chicago-Italian cook and she had never heard of such a thing, but she had seen it as an ingredient in spaghetti pesto sauce, and in baked spaghetti - strictly American inventions.
Just remember, what is to one trash, is to another treasure. I never used cottage cheese in lasagna until I met my wife. Her family used it exclusively, and didn't like ricotta cheese at all. I tried it her way and it tasted pretty good. Her version of Sloppy Joe filliing and Tacos would probably raise eyebrows as well. But she won't eat them any other way. They are what she grew up with. I like it all. If it tastes good, is seasoned properly, and the texture works, then I don't often stand on tradition. I may love the original, but that won't stop me from eating someone else's idea of what it's supposed to be, whatever the dish is. I do draw the line at using baking soda to tenderize or season beef though. To me, it tastes horrible. And yet, I've known two ladies who swear that it's the only way to get all of the flavor our of beef.

Keep an open mind, and remember that everyone has differing taste buds, that are influenced by their sensitivity to flavors, what they grew up with, and their ability to try new and sometimes interesting variations.

I'm a lucky guy. I like most everything and so am very flexible. It allows me to enjoy things from all over the world, and from most homes where I might be invited as a guest. It also allows me to tailor my cooking to who I'm making it for.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-15-2009, 06:49 PM   #22
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For me it is oregano, basil, onions, garlic, and a touch of chili flakes. But, like Goodweed, I'm not adverse to experiments or other people's version that they grew up with .... well, maybe with the exception of my ex's family who used Campbell's tomato soup with some brown sugar for virtually all tomato sauces. I've lived places where what is called Cincinatti chili was called "Greek Spaghetti". The thing is when you're tasting a different version of any dish is to suspend preconceived notions so that you can enjoy something different. The first time I had "Greek Spaghetti/Cincinatti Chili" was in southern Virginia (where it is called the former) and if I had a dime for everyone I know who practically had a temper tantrum (THIS ISN'T SPAGHETTI!) when tasting it for the first time I'd be rich. Perhaps it's because I was introduced to the flavors by a Greek friend who made "Greek Lasagna" so was open to it. But it is yummy, once you get past cinnamon in a savory dish.

My favorite shortcut for spaghetti sauce is Del Monte canned tomatoes with basil and garlic. I'd rather use just a can of that than any jarred sauces, which always strike me as being too sweet.
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Old 09-15-2009, 07:19 PM   #23
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Cinnamon in any tomato sauce is an automatic unconditional deal-killer for me. Simply personal preference & one I have no plans to "get used to". I simply don't like what I consider "baking spices" in savory dishes. Never have, never will.

Years ago, back in the 70's/80's when I lived in NY, we had a fabulous long-standing local Italian restaurant. Then, out of the blue, except for the sauce they used on their pizzas, all their pasta sauces had cinnamon in them. Yuck. It was probably healthier for me though, as I was no longer able to have a side of pasta with my entrees - had to order a green veg instead - lol!!
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Old 09-15-2009, 08:13 PM   #24
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Cinnamon? Weird. I can't say I'm going to try it soon, but I WILL try it.
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Old 09-15-2009, 11:33 PM   #25
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I tried it once, by accident, and with disastrouserous results. I was making spaghetti with a tomato based Bolognese sauce, at my MOL's house. I reached for a container that was marked garlic, as I didn't have any fresh garlic available. I sprinkled the contents liberally into the sauce, as I was making a very large batch. To my horror, out poured cinnamon. My Mother-In-Law had reused the bottle without changing the label. The sauce was truly gross and disgusting. I tried to save it, remembering a tamale that had been made for me with tomato, cinnamon, and raisins that had been very good. I finally had to give up and throw it in the trash. I learned two valuable lessons that day, check the contents of all containers when cooking in a kitchen that isn't your own, and cinnamon does not work in my Bolognese Sauce.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-16-2009, 04:13 AM   #26
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Fideo

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Originally Posted by PattY1 View Post
Mexican Spaghetti???
Mexican Spaghetti is also called Fideo, the pasta is similar to angel hair...its basically pasta slighty brown it then add tomato sauce,garlic,onions, pepper,s salt. you can also add ground beef or chicken...this can also be soup by adding bouillon cubes dissolved in water and simmering the pasta with it.
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Old 09-16-2009, 06:18 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mexican mama View Post
Mexican Spaghetti is also called Fideo, the pasta is similar to angel hair...its basically pasta slighty brown it then add tomato sauce,garlic,onions, pepper,s salt. you can also add ground beef or chicken...this can also be soup by adding bouillon cubes dissolved in water and simmering the pasta with it.
Humm..... I learn something new every day.
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Old 09-17-2009, 07:02 AM   #28
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Hi

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Humm..... I learn something new every day.
I aim to please
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Old 01-27-2010, 11:29 AM   #29
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Why not trying the Italian way. No canned tomato. Buy fresh, red, mushy tomatoes.
Peel them (hard), unless you have the tool that presses the tomatoes. A potato press would work.
Then, olive oil, just a little, in the pan, garlic slice, and let it for 2 minutes the most.
Put tomatoes for 10 minutes and then press on the potato press.
This is Pomarola!
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Old 01-27-2010, 11:39 AM   #30
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I agree with Alton Brown, that canned whole peeled tomatoes are one of the very few canned products that are worth purchasing. They are picked and processed at their peak of ripeness, are very consistent in flavor and quality, and they don't require any special tools to get the peel off. They are immediately ready all year round.
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