"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-02-2011, 03:01 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Mamuje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 9
Why does my aubergine taste bitter when I grill them?

Any useful information will be helpful.

I usually rub olive oil and salt in them before I grill or roast in the oven.

__________________

__________________
Mamuje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 03:19 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
I can't help you with grilling eggplant. I wouldn't even know how to choose one for purchase. I'll be watching this thread though, as it's something I have wanted to try.
__________________

__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 03:30 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Look for the smaller firmer ones...The larger ones are older, more seeds, more bitter. Stay away from large soft, mushy ones......

Enjoy!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 03:51 PM   #4
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,796
Ever try salting them to draw out the bitter tasting liquid? Sprinkle salt over both sides of the slices, let stand for 1/2 hour, then rinse the salt off. Oh, you won't need to use any salt to season.

Craig
__________________
CraigC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 03:57 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
Zereh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 1,548
What Bob said! =) This info is from What's Cooking America:

Quote:
Purchasing Eggplant: Smaller, immature eggplants are best. Full-size puffy ones may have hard seeds and can be bitter. Choose a firm, smooth-skinned eggplant that is heavy for its size; avoid those with soft or brown spots. Gently push with your thumb or forefinger. If the flesh gives slightly but then bounces back, it is ripe. If the indentation remains, it is overripe and the insides will be mushy. If there is no give, the eggplant was picked too early. Also make sure an eggplant isn't dry inside, knock on it with your knuckles. If you hear a hollow sound, don't buy it. NOTE: Whether or not there is an appreciable difference, I don't know.

Storing Eggplant: Eggplants are very perishable and become bitter with age. They should be stored in a cool, dry place and used within a day or two of purchase. To store in the refrigerator, place in a plastic bag. If you plan to cook it the same day you buy it, leave it out at room temperature.

Preparing Eggplant: When young, the skin of most eggplants are edible; older eggplants should be peeled. since the flesh discolors rapidly, an eggplant should be cut just before using.


There are many varieties which range from dark purple to pale mauve, and from yellow to white. The longer purple variety is the most commonly eaten. It is one of the more popular vegetables in the world, and it is a staple of Italian cooking throughout Italy. For hundreds of years, it was grown only in Sicily and southern Italy.
__________________
~~
Zereh

We are fed by a food industry which pays no attention to health, and healed by a health industry that pays no attention to food - Wendell Berry
Zereh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 04:06 PM   #6
Head Chef
 
Zereh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 1,548
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Ever try salting them to draw out the bitter tasting liquid? Sprinkle salt over both sides of the slices, let stand for 1/2 hour, then rinse the salt off. Oh, you won't need to use any salt to season.
I am pretty sure I read that the salting does not actually remove the bitterness but only tricks (and delays) our ability to detect it. I could have sworn the article was done by someone I was likely to believe. I'll dig around for it and if I find it I'll post again.
__________________
~~
Zereh

We are fed by a food industry which pays no attention to health, and healed by a health industry that pays no attention to food - Wendell Berry
Zereh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 05:29 PM   #7
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zereh View Post
I am pretty sure I read that the salting does not actually remove the bitterness but only tricks (and delays) our ability to detect it. I could have sworn the article was done by someone I was likely to believe. I'll dig around for it and if I find it I'll post again.
I've used it and it seems to work. I put the slices in a collander over a bowl, lay a plate on top and weigh them down. The brown liquid that drains off is pretty nasty.

Has anyone ever had the Gretel variety? Very small, maybe 4 to 6 inches long with a max diameter of 1". The skin is pearl white. Never bitter. They grow like weeds.

Craig
__________________
CraigC is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 05:45 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
Mamuje's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 9
Thanks for all your comments. Very helpful indeed. I will be cooking aubergines tomorrow so would salt them and place a heavy weight on them. Wish me luck :-)
__________________
Mamuje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 06:36 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Salting (sweating) will indeed draw out a lot of brown, nasty, and funky liquid which is a good indicator that you are dealing with old, over ripe, poorly handled etc, etc. eggplant...So what's the point? ~~ You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2011, 06:42 PM   #10
Executive Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,794
Maybe your Aubergine has had a hard life, with some harsh conditions. That would make anyone bitter.
__________________

__________________
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
grill

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.