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Old 04-01-2016, 08:08 PM   #21
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I haven't 'velveted' before, but I've heard about it for years now with such positive results. I'd love to try it. Thanks for the info and links, everyone.
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Old 04-01-2016, 08:53 PM   #22
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Bull headed I admit, so I was both little skeptical and nervous over following the exact directions last night. But guess what? Now I know for sure, and I'm sold.


Creative, I'm sure your recipe is delicious, but by definition it hasn't been "velveted".
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Old 04-01-2016, 10:37 PM   #23
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GotGarlic - the chinese recipe did say to marinade it for a few hours or overnight. (Turning it several times for the first hour - to help ensure the cornflour disperses evenly).
Old recipes are often based on ingredients that are not available or not common in current markets. Modern chicken has been bred to be more tender, and is generally slaughtered at a much younger age than they used to be, which also contributes to tenderness. So older recipes - even from 20 or so years ago - often don't account for these differences.

Kenji from Serious Eats extensively tests different ingredients, methods and techniques before publishing his recipes. I used to think that it was necessary to marinate chicken for many hours, but I have found from experience that that isn't so
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Old 04-02-2016, 12:37 AM   #24
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Very interesting, Kayelle. I just marinate and toss into oil. So much easier because I am a lazy cook. Maybe not so lazy, but rather slow.

Josie, do you ever use the Egg Beaters 100% Egg Whites? I think using those would be easier for me since I have no idea what I would do with all the leftover yolks. LOTS of hollandaise sauce, I guess.


CG I only stir fry about once a month
so I don't have a problem using up the yolks.
I never buy Egg beaters
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Old 04-02-2016, 04:42 AM   #25
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I used to think that it was necessary to marinate chicken for many hours, but I have found from experience that that isn't so
Many years ago I read that marinades fall into two categories - flavor and tenderizing. Flavor marinades only require 30 - 40 minutes at most, and tenderizing marinades require hours (or even overnight).

Grilled chicken strips is a common after work meal for us. Start dinner prep by cutting the chicken breasts into 2 or 3 strips and coating them with marinade (often a bottled marinade), and then proceed with prepping the rest of the dinner and lighting the grill. That pre-marinated stuff at the store tends to be mealy from sitting in marinade way too long. Flavor marinades containing oil keep the chicken from drying out on the grill.
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Old 04-02-2016, 09:51 AM   #26
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Testing has shown most marinades do not tenderize. Typically, marinades containing dairy or certain enzymes such as those found in papaya and pineapple are the only ones that tenderize meats.

Many marinades will make the surface of meats mushy.
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Old 04-02-2016, 10:32 AM   #27
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Many years ago I read ...
This is the key. Lots of cooking myths that people believed many years ago have been proven by testing to be faulty.
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Old 04-02-2016, 02:13 PM   #28
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Testing has shown most marinades do not tenderize. Typically, marinades containing dairy or certain enzymes such as those found in papaya and pineapple are the only ones that tenderize meats.

Many marinades will make the surface of meats mushy.
Yes so SOME marinades DO tenderise meat!

Also 'velveting' suggests a softening of texture which I can vouch for, i.e. the chinese recipe I have tried does this!
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Old 04-02-2016, 02:27 PM   #29
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Some of us may remember Adolph's Meat Tenderizer. It's still available in a shaker jar to tenderize tough cuts of meat. It is made up of salt, sugar, corn starch and bromelain, an extract from the pineapple plant that tenderizes meat protein.
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Old 04-02-2016, 03:02 PM   #30
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Yes so SOME marinades DO tenderise meat!

Also 'velveting' suggests a softening of texture which I can vouch for, i.e. the chinese recipe I have tried does this!
Yikes! Well, I GUESS you must be RIGHT!! with all the exclamation! points!! and smilies!!

Your recipe didn't include a tenderizing agent, though. Whatever the texture you ended up with, it's still not velveting.
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