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Old 07-13-2006, 08:55 PM   #1
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French bread

How can I get a light and fluffy crumb for my French bread? Is this possible using a conventional oven?

I have tried numerous times to make bread like that from a bakery, with a very soft and cottonball-like crumb. My loaves register a proper internal temperature but come out quite heavy.

The only time I recall making a decent French baguette was when using fresh yeast, but I have read that instant dry can create a loaf just as good if done properly.

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Old 07-13-2006, 10:23 PM   #2
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I think it has to do with oven temperature and humidity... if I am not mistaken, a lot of both.
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Old 07-14-2006, 12:24 AM   #3
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I think it has to do with the type of flour you use also they also use alot of steam in professional ovens you can get the steam by throwing a couple of ice cubes onto the bottom of oven.Again I still believe its the type of flour you need.
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Old 07-14-2006, 01:12 PM   #4
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Bakingmad - I use a conventional oven to make my French bread & it always comes out great, without using any "tricks", like water pans, bread stones, etc. - just a regular baking sheet. I end up with a lovely soft interior & a great crispy crust (I do sometimes brush on a little egg-white wash for that - lol).

I don't have the recipe at the moment, but I just use the basic recipe that came with my KitchenAid mixer. They might even have it online.
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Old 07-14-2006, 01:49 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bakingmad
How can I get a light and fluffy crumb for my French bread? Is this possible using a conventional oven?

I have tried numerous times to make bread like that from a bakery, with a very soft and cottonball-like crumb. My loaves register a proper internal temperature but come out quite heavy.

The only time I recall making a decent French baguette was when using fresh yeast, but I have read that instant dry can create a loaf just as good if done properly.
I've been following this since yesterday morning. Here is what confuses me. I wouldn't describe french bread (made from flour, water, yeast and salt) as having a "very soft and cottonball-like crumb." That description brings to mind bread made with more fat dairy and sugar.
I don't claim to be an expert so maybe I'm wrong. I wouldn't call good french bread "quite heavy" so maybe I'm missing the point.
Perhaps if you shared your ingredients, including flour type, and process the more experienced bakers here could shed more light on the subject.
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Old 07-15-2006, 05:35 AM   #6
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I don't know if i can give a link ? If not, delete my answer

http://pbs-juliachild.virage.com/cgi...t=0&viKeyword=


Choose breads and baked goods in category and choose Danielle Forestier in chefs. You will have the right way to make perfect french bread
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Old 07-15-2006, 07:00 PM   #7
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Now that you mention it...

It might not be a French bread that I'm looking for. I would have to ask what they use at the bakery where I've purchased this kind of loaf, which might contain fats, etc.

My bread being "quite heavy" was not intentional, but a problem I've been having with them.
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Old 07-15-2006, 07:05 PM   #8
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I don't think I'm allowing my bread to rise properly, but then again, the type of crumb that I'm looking for might require other ingredients in addtion to water, flour, yeast and salt.

If anything, my conventional oven "might" be a bit off, temperature-wise, but most likely it is something in my method that is lacking.
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Old 07-15-2006, 07:23 PM   #9
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Any particular series? I'm not getting any results using just "Breads and baked goods" and "Danielle Forestier."



Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabrine
I don't know if i can give a link ? If not, delete my answer

http://pbs-juliachild.virage.com/cgi...t=0&viKeyword=


Choose breads and baked goods in category and choose Danielle Forestier in chefs. You will have the right way to make perfect french bread
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Old 07-15-2006, 07:38 PM   #10
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Serie is "baking with Julia"
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