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Old 10-19-2011, 08:38 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I'd be tempted to drink the brandy or throw it in with a pork roast...
Drink it, why should the roast get it.
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Old 10-20-2011, 01:21 PM   #22
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BevMo is having their Buy 1, Get 1 5 cents sale again, although I'm not sure if it includes brandy.
To make fruitcake, you pretty much have to start now. There's a "watering" process, where you pour brandy all over the cake every 3 days for 2 months. Here's the recipe my friend gave me:

Christmas Fruit Cake

1 lb currants
6 oz sultanas
6 oz raisins
2 oz glace cherries
2 oz mixed chopped lemon and orange peel
Boil water and pour enough to cover the above fruits. Let cool, add brandy to taste, then store for at least overnight (I mentioned earlier doing this the year before you need it so the flavors really develop, but if you need it in a pinch, store at the very least overnight). When ready to use, drain off the liquid but keep the fruits moist and plump.

8 oz AP flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
8 oz butter
8 oz brown sugar
4 large eggs
1 Tbsp molasses
2 oz chopped almonds
zest of one lemon
zest of one orange

Grease and line a 8" cake pan with parchment paper
Preheat oven to 275 degrees F.
Sift four, salt and spices into a large mixing bowl.
Cream butter and sugar until light. Add eggs one at a time, then add in molasses. Mix well.
Fold in flour mixture.
Fold in fruits, almonds and peels.
Pour batter into pan and cover with a double layer of parchment paper with a 1" circle cut out in the middle.
Bake for 4 to 5 hours on lowest shelf in the oven, until skewer comes out clean. Do not overbake or it will be dry!
Rest for 30 min in cake pan then place on wire rack until cold.
Wrap with foil, keep in an airtight container.
Every 3 days, use a skewer to poke holes in the cake and "water" with brandy, until ready to eat.
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Old 10-21-2011, 10:51 AM   #23
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Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by chocotuile View Post
BevMo is having their Buy 1, Get 1 5 cents sale again, although I'm not sure if it includes brandy.
To make fruitcake, you pretty much have to start now. There's a "watering" process, where you pour brandy all over the cake every 3 days for 2 months. Here's the recipe my friend gave me:

Christmas Fruit Cake

1 lb currants
6 oz sultanas
6 oz raisins
2 oz glace cherries
2 oz mixed chopped lemon and orange peel
Boil water and pour enough to cover the above fruits. Let cool, add brandy to taste, then store for at least overnight (I mentioned earlier doing this the year before you need it so the flavors really develop, but if you need it in a pinch, store at the very least overnight). When ready to use, drain off the liquid but keep the fruits moist and plump.

8 oz AP flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
8 oz butter
8 oz brown sugar
4 large eggs
1 Tbsp molasses
2 oz chopped almonds
zest of one lemon
zest of one orange

Grease and line a 8" cake pan with parchment paper
Preheat oven to 275 degrees F.
Sift four, salt and spices into a large mixing bowl.
Cream butter and sugar until light. Add eggs one at a time, then add in molasses. Mix well.
Fold in flour mixture.
Fold in fruits, almonds and peels.
Pour batter into pan and cover with a double layer of parchment paper with a 1" circle cut out in the middle.
Bake for 4 to 5 hours on lowest shelf in the oven, until skewer comes out clean. Do not overbake or it will be dry!
Rest for 30 min in cake pan then place on wire rack until cold.
Wrap with foil, keep in an airtight container.
Every 3 days, use a skewer to poke holes in the cake and "water" with brandy, until ready to eat.
THANK YOU SO MUCH CHOCOTUILE, I am going to the store today and start this cake right away. May I ask one question, when the cake needs to be "watered" approximately how much brandy to you pour on at each application? This recipe looks wonderful and I believe this is what will get me extra points with my husband. I will give you feedback.
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Old 10-21-2011, 11:10 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I'd be tempted to drink the brandy...
NOW you're talking! The pig's dead...he won't enjoy it!
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Old 10-21-2011, 11:29 AM   #25
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You're very welcome :) I pour about 1/4 to 1/2 cup each time, but my friend told me she pours much more than that. Honestly, I was doing less to conserve my brandy and she did admonish me on that! I'm still on the edge with fruitcake; I guess I didn't grow up with it so I have no warm childhood memories of it. But I am absolutely in love with stollen, especially with the brandied fruits inside! I gave away too many loaves last year to family and friends, and ended up with not enough for myself!
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Old 10-21-2011, 11:57 AM   #26
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Interesting facts about fruitcake:

The oldest known fruitcake is approximately 130 years old and lives under glass in a Michigan home. It was baked by a woman in preparation for a Thanksgiving meal in 1878, but she died right before the holiday and her family didn’t have the heart to eat it. So instead of throwing it out, they saved it and passed it down through the generations. In 2005 this fruitcake made an appearance on “The Tonight Show” and Jay Leno actually took a bite.

Basting fruitcakes with liquor and powdering them with sugar on occasion prevents mold and ensures their long shelf life. Many people believe this is the charm of fruitcake, similar to a fine wine, and will wait up to 25 years to eat them.

Fruitcakes have existed since Roman times but it appears people got fed up with them and in the 1700’s fruitcake was banned throughout Continental Europe for being “sinful.”

In 2005, fruitcake was officially listed as a national security threat. Airline passengers were banned from bringing them as a carry-on when flying. Because of their extreme density, the x-ray machines at screening points were unable to determine if they contained hidden weapons and every fruitcake that went through security had to be carefully inspected. Rather than have to deal with all the fruitcakes (the food, not the people) flying around the county at Christmas time, the government simply banned them.

Several monasteries in the United States have taken to producing fruitcakes for added income. The 14 monks of Assumption Abbey in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri create 23,000 fruitcakes per holiday season. I wonder how much of the liquor that is bought for these cakes makes it into the actual product, but a vow of silence from the monks will keep that a secret forever. There are, however, other ways to capitalize on fruitcakes. Manitoba, Canada held its 12th annual Fruitcake Toss last January. The winner catapulted his fruitcake almost 450 feet.
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Old 10-21-2011, 12:15 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timothy View Post
NOW you're talking! The pig's dead...he won't enjoy it!
I am with you, no disrespect to the pig, but he is dead. Cheers!!
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Old 10-21-2011, 12:23 PM   #28
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Cool facts Timothy, I really found them interesting.

Thanks also for info. Chocotuile, are you sure I won't get drunk? lol
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Old 10-21-2011, 12:52 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timothy View Post
Interesting facts about fruitcake:

The oldest known fruitcake is approximately 130 years old and lives under glass in a Michigan home. It was baked by a woman in preparation for a Thanksgiving meal in 1878, but she died right before the holiday and her family didn’t have the heart to eat it. So instead of throwing it out, they saved it and passed it down through the generations. In 2005 this fruitcake made an appearance on “The Tonight Show” and Jay Leno actually took a bite.

Basting fruitcakes with liquor and powdering them with sugar on occasion prevents mold and ensures their long shelf life. Many people believe this is the charm of fruitcake, similar to a fine wine, and will wait up to 25 years to eat them.

Fruitcakes have existed since Roman times but it appears people got fed up with them and in the 1700’s fruitcake was banned throughout Continental Europe for being “sinful.”

In 2005, fruitcake was officially listed as a national security threat. Airline passengers were banned from bringing them as a carry-on when flying. Because of their extreme density, the x-ray machines at screening points were unable to determine if they contained hidden weapons and every fruitcake that went through security had to be carefully inspected. Rather than have to deal with all the fruitcakes (the food, not the people) flying around the county at Christmas time, the government simply banned them.

Several monasteries in the United States have taken to producing fruitcakes for added income. The 14 monks of Assumption Abbey in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri create 23,000 fruitcakes per holiday season. I wonder how much of the liquor that is bought for these cakes makes it into the actual product, but a vow of silence from the monks will keep that a secret forever. There are, however, other ways to capitalize on fruitcakes. Manitoba, Canada held its 12th annual Fruitcake Toss last January. The winner catapulted his fruitcake almost 450 feet.
Timothy. Loving this information about fruitcake. It's so interesting to have some answers and explanations about old traditions and where they come from. Got anymore interesting facts to share?
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Old 10-21-2011, 02:24 PM   #30
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Thanks for the interesting tidbits, Timothy! I love learning about the history of foods. Being so dense a cake, I didn't think the cake could be catapulted even 100 feet, let alone 450!
Pierogi, some of my (weak) relatives did get a little whoozy last Christmas from this cake. I had mine with spiked eggnog, so double the whammy for me!
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German Stollen Bread I tried making German Stollen Bread and bombed, it didn't rise and the dough was very dense. I baked it anyway and it came out like a hockey puck. Any help.....:ohmy: 3 stars 1 reviews
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