"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > The Back Porch > Off Topic Discussions
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-06-2013, 01:24 AM   #41
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,747
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
That's interesting. I never really considered VA a "southern" state.
wow, my bil would have a massive problem with that.

even though he was born and raised in jersey, then served in the navy all over the world, he ended up settling in western virginia and is such a proud southerner that he gets in your face about it at every opportunity. confederate flag displayed at all times, lol.

when my mil passed away and he swallowed his deep, southern pride to come north and slum it with a bunch of yankees, he went a little nuts after he couldn't find a certain nascar race on tv or radio. i teasingly offered to drive him around the block a few hundred times making left turns, and even pull into a gas station to have the tank filled and tires checked by someone else (lol, you can't pump your own gas in jersey) and he went off on me.

anywho, he hasn't been back since. good riddance, but i'm kind of sorry to wish him on decent southern people.

i watched a good show called something like "do you know dixie", and i loved when trace adkins said that florida wasn't really a southern state. it used to he connected up korth, but broke off and floated down and reconnected to georgia. lol.
__________________

__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 02:14 AM   #42
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,884
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
My mother was an excellent cook. I loved just about everything she cooked. If I went camping or on some other trip, I could hardly wait to get home to her food.

The only thing she couldn't cook properly was liver and onions. Now, a lot of people enjoyed the way she cooked it, but I discovered, as a young adult that liver was an edible food - just don't cook it for an hour. She did make good leverpostej (Danish liver pâté).

One of my favourites was holidays when she would stuff a bird with meatloaf. Oh my, that was good stuff. She thought Yankees were being cheap when they used bread in their stuffing. She also laid an amazing smørbrødsbord / smörgåsbord. It had Danish and Swedish specialties because she was Danish and my dad was Swedish.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 02:34 AM   #43
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,747
i'm curious, taxy, what was in your smorgasbords? or is it smorgasborden?

as a side note, my son recently told me that english was derived from french. i almost hit the ceiling!

i told him that the closest language to english was germanic and latin, with french words sprinkled in.

i can't wait until the next parent/teacher conference day.
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 02:57 AM   #44
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
What an interesting thread! Thanks Snip and everyone for the insights.

Actually, my Dad was the better cook in the household and this post and recipe might be something many of you want to try......
Down memory lane ("German Stew" recipe)
I love learning more about everyone on DC
Must say only my mom and gran ever cooked. I took over most of the cooking duties when I was 6.
My dad made use dinner one night and burned down the kitchen "literally"
He put hot oil on the stove for chips and fell asleep in front of the TV. I still remember him waking us all up and running us through the flames in the kitchen
Almost lost the house. He never cooks food without burning something!

Thank you everyone for posting and sharing your lovely memories
__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 08:46 AM   #45
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,316
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
i'm curious, taxy, what was in your smorgasbords? or is it smorgasborden?

as a side note, my son recently told me that english was derived from french. i almost hit the ceiling!

i told him that the closest language to english was germanic and latin, with french words sprinkled in.

i can't wait until the next parent/teacher conference day.
Yes, English is a Endo-germanic language, however, 60% of the words in English are derived from Latin and French. I can't remember the exact % of French off the top of my head. PBS had a great series on the History of the English Language. Not sure if it is on the web site or not. I have a textbook about the History of the English Language (one of the many courses I took in Grad school). I'm not sure in which box it resides...the cookbooks have taken over my bookshelves and the language books have been packed away (except for the ones I use for work...about 50).

English grammar structure is not based on French. I want to say it is closer to Greek and Latin, but I might be confusing that with German grammar. It is early and I haven't had my cup of Snip's Put Hair on Your Chest tea, yet.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 01:36 PM   #46
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,884
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
i'm curious, taxy, what was in your smorgasbords? or is it smorgasborden?

...
There was a table of mostly stuff to put on sandwiches: fried fish, pickled fish, smoked fish, shrimp, hard boiled eggs (and a slicer), sliced tomatoes & cucumbers, cucumber salad, cold cuts (my mum probably made the Scandinavian ones like "rullepølse" and "sylte" [it's Swedish and sort of like head cheese] and Danish liver pâté [leverpostej]), and cheeses. There might also be something warm, like meatballs. I forgot, of course bread: heavy rye, crisp ryes, Norwegian flat bread, and probably some whole wheat Wonder Bread.

Smörgåsbord is both the singular and the plural. Smörgåsborden is both the singular and plural, but in the definite, i.e., the Smörgåsbord.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 02:11 PM   #47
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 36,293
There is a reason I get elected to cook when I go visiting my family...out of 6 people in the family, I am the only one who has any experience with real cooking. My Brother is teachable if all he has to do is run the grill...
__________________
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 03:01 PM   #48
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,877
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
That's interesting. I never really considered VA a "southern" state. Sure, I know their history, but I guess PA being so close to VA I never considered them part of "the south".
I don't consider being in the south until I get to the bottom of North Carolina or through TN... but that's me.

Not that y'all can't cook Southern potlucks
Trust me, mah deah, there are plenty of Virginians who are still unhappy about the Late Unpleasantness I am in the southeast corner near the historic triangle of Jamestown, Yorktown and Williamsburg, and people here are obsessed with the state's history. It's very different from Northern Virginia. Closer to Pa., many people are transplants from other areas who came for government or NGO jobs up there.

To get back on topic, another favorite dish from childhood is my dad's German sausage cooked in sauerkraut with beer - his family is German. Yummy stuff. One of our German exchange students told me his mother makes it with caraway seeds, so I started adding that, too. And Russian teacakes at Christmas were my favorite. I made them for the first time a few years ago and was amazed that they tasted just like my mom's.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 06:29 PM   #49
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,316
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
There was a table of mostly stuff to put on sandwiches: fried fish, pickled fish, smoked fish, shrimp, hard boiled eggs (and a slicer), sliced tomatoes & cucumbers, cucumber salad, cold cuts (my mum probably made the Scandinavian ones like "rullepølse" and "sylte" [it's Swedish and sort of like head cheese] and Danish liver pâté [leverpostej]), and cheeses. There might also be something warm, like meatballs. I forgot, of course bread: heavy rye, crisp ryes, Norwegian flat bread, and probably some whole wheat Wonder Bread.

Smörgåsbord is both the singular and the plural. Smörgåsborden is both the singular and plural, but in the definite, i.e., the Smörgåsbord.
Ours has cold dishes--pickled herring, gravlox, (sp), shrimp salad, all kinds of open-faced sandwiches, beet-pickled herring salad and other salads. There have to be 7 different things. The "warm" table usually has meatballs, ham, Jansen's Temptation, roast beef, cabbage rolls, venison roast, and I can't remember what all. There are usually 7 cold "main" dishes and 7 "hot" main dishes and ALWAYS 7 cookies/desserts on the dessert table. It takes a good three hours to eat your way through it.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 06:48 PM   #50
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,884
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Ours has cold dishes--pickled herring, gravlox, (sp), shrimp salad, all kinds of open-faced sandwiches, beet-pickled herring salad and other salads. There have to be 7 different things. The "warm" table usually has meatballs, ham, Jansen's Temptation, roast beef, cabbage rolls, venison roast, and I can't remember what all. There are usually 7 cold "main" dishes and 7 "hot" main dishes and ALWAYS 7 cookies/desserts on the dessert table. It takes a good three hours to eat your way through it.
Well, the open-faced sandwiches were made by each person for their own consumption. My mum used to do more hot food, but we never had room to finish it. Of course there was stuff like pickled beets as garnish.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
meals

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.