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Old 07-28-2006, 03:16 AM   #11
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Good morning Marlene

". My son on the other hand is an eating machine. As long as it doesn't have olives in it, he will eat it. "

Lol I had a son like that, now he loves cooking
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Old 07-28-2006, 08:38 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaCook
Also cooking pasta in a large pot of salted water helps keeping it from sticking together.
Olive oil works too.
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Old 07-28-2006, 09:33 AM   #13
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Thank you for the kind words Dave - I really don't know how I got along before having Culinary Artistry in my kitchen!!

Some of my best food combinations have come to be because of cleaning out the fridge!! And most times I don't write down what I had... ;)
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Old 07-28-2006, 10:03 AM   #14
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"Some of my best food combinations have come to be because of cleaning out the fridge!! And most times I don't write down what I had... ;)"
The times I have done that lol
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Old 07-28-2006, 10:44 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vagriller
Olive oil works too.
Va, won't the olive oil make the pasta slippery and therefore the pasta sauce won't cling well to it? Just asking...

On another matter relating to pasta, don't be surprised when you see a hairdryer in my kitchen. I'm finicky about having my pasta al dente. So after straining the pasta in the collander, I use my hairdryer (power HIGH, air COOL) to stop the pasta from cooking . (Rinsing the pasta is a no-no in my kitchen ...!)
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Old 07-28-2006, 12:11 PM   #16
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Roux Based Sauces (such as Bechamel )

To make them smooth and silky, cook in a double boiler for at least 25 minutes or on the lowest heat possible stirring now and again.


I have seldom seen this advice in cook books, they just tell you to stir until thickened, they never come out silky that way.
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Old 07-28-2006, 01:02 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopstix
Va, won't the olive oil make the pasta slippery and therefore the pasta sauce won't cling well to it? Just asking...
It doesn't seem to be a problem. You don't put a whole lot, just 1/2 tablespoon-full tablespoon or so in the pot.
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Old 08-21-2006, 04:59 PM   #18
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Also vegetables will retain more color if you do NOT cover them while cooking. Don't ask me why, but I heard this on a TV show and it actually works.

Another natural herb combo is that I think thyme and sage go very well together in virtually any poultry, pork, or fish dish that is Euro (as opposed to Asian) in background.

Southeast Asian food needs lots of fresh herbs: Cilantro, parsley, mints of almost any kind. When you get outside a part of the country where there is a large Thai, Vietnamese, etc population, it is where they skimp and to me it really ruins the experience. We once asked a restaurant owner in Florida why no herbs. He replied that the Americans there (mostly elderly retirees from PA and NH) actually complained about having all that "green c***" on their plates! So when you experiment with these dishes do NOT skimp on fresh herbs. Pile them on a plate and let everyone garnish to their own taste.

There is no shame in using the microwave oven. You can bring things up to warm or half cooked then finish on the grill or in the oven. You know Julia said to keep some things to yourself in the kitchen. In this case even your fussiest guests will not know if you started your potatoes in the microwave oven, then finished them in a very hot conventional oven or fried. I learned this trick when I lived in a trailer for 3 years and the air conditioning couldn't keep up with the stove. Now my kitchen is not air conditioned so on hot days I often start things in the microwave and just finish them under more conventional heat sources. If it is there, use it and just zip your lips in case you're cooking for a microwave snob.

To me the most important cooking tip is to develop a circle of food-loving, non-food-snob friends. Make sure to marry someone like that as well. Open minds at the table, people you can hand a vegetable peeler to and say "help!" in a crunch. People who will never question that you put a different seasoning in a dish than they are used to, or that your fried chicken isn't real southern fried the way they had it, or anything like that. People who will never say "yuck" at the table (a big faux pas in my family as a child) ... you're never going to be able to cook exactly what everyone loves every time, and neither you nor your guests should take that personally. I guess the bottom line on that is good manners all around.
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Old 08-22-2006, 01:02 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
To me the most important cooking tip is to develop a circle of food-loving, non-food-snob friends. Make sure to marry someone like that as well. Open minds at the table, people you can hand a vegetable peeler to and say "help!" in a crunch. People who will never question that you put a different seasoning in a dish than they are used to, or that your fried chicken isn't real southern fried the way they had it, or anything like that. People who will never say "yuck" at the table (a big faux pas in my family as a child) ... you're never going to be able to cook exactly what everyone loves every time, and neither you nor your guests should take that personally. I guess the bottom line on that is good manners all around.
Could not agree more! PS could you tell the above to my in laws please?
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Old 08-31-2006, 04:20 AM   #20
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If using table salt in a salt shaker, add a few grains if rice to the salt shaker. It absorbs the damp and allows the salt to run freely.
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