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Old 08-29-2007, 09:39 AM   #21
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Andy’s right. What you just described is a slurry of flour and water used to thicken the 1/4 cup of hot liquid from the dutch oven. The brown seasoning sauce in this recipe is definitely Kitchen Bouquet or Gravy Master. These sauces will add color and flavor to your gravy.....the gravy is made from the flour, wate,r and 1/4 cup of liquid.

The simplest gravy to make is a liquid plus a thickener. In your case, the thickener is the slurry of flour and water. In this recipe, they also want to add some seasoning and color to it as well, thus they call for the “brown seasoning sauce”.

Gravy Master has 120mg of sodium per teaspoon where as Kitchen Bouquet has only 10mg per teaspoon, so keep that in mind when you pick which one to use.
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Old 08-29-2007, 11:16 AM   #22
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You absolutely do not need browning agent in coq au vin! The sauce isn't supposed to be brown. It's made with red wine -- that's the coloring agent for the dish.
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Old 08-29-2007, 12:34 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
You absolutely do not need browning agent in coq au vin! The sauce isn't supposed to be brown. It's made with red wine -- that's the coloring agent for the dish.
Agree, the wine is a major contributor to both colour and flavour in a traditional coq au vin recipe. However, without knowing the ingredient list of this particular recipe, one can only guess at why it might need the help of a flavour/colour enhancer.


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Old 08-29-2007, 12:46 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
You absolutely do not need browning agent in coq au vin! The sauce isn't supposed to be brown. It's made with red wine -- that's the coloring agent for the dish.
Iím betting that this version of the recipe isnít using wine. Thatís the only reason I could imagine it calling for the browning sauce. Also, notice it called for a flour and water slurry on the side (presumably at the end of cooking) and 1/4 cup of the Dutch Oven liquid (apparently this is cooked in a DO). Had this been a traditional version of Coq Au Vin, that liquid would have been thick enough as it is......which makes me think they didnít flour or brown the chicken at the start of this recipe (or brown the chicken and then add flour later).
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Old 08-29-2007, 01:21 PM   #25
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You cannot make Coq au Vin without wine.
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Old 08-29-2007, 01:24 PM   #26
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Yep. Coq au vin means chicken with wine. Would have to be called coq sans vin otherwise.
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Old 08-29-2007, 01:25 PM   #27
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Then it would be coq sans vin
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Old 08-29-2007, 01:49 PM   #28
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Oh, I know. Iím just guessing as to what has happened in this recipe. It sounds more like chicken boiled in broth or water to me. Also, traditional Coq Au Vin would have added flour during the cooking process so that the final liquid was thick enough. Obviously, this recipe didnít do that as it indicates using the liquid with a thickener and browning sauce....this implies the liquid is thin and pale in color. Obviously, red wine was not used. It could have been Coq Au Vin Blanc or Coq Au Vin avec Creme, made with white wine.....but that still doesnít explain the absence of flour (which would have thickened the sauce) during the cooking process.

So, thinking out-loud, I mused that perhaps since this was a WW recipe, they eliminated the wine? True, that means it can not technically be Coq Au Vin (literally ďrooster with wineĒ), but that doesnít stop someone out there from taking the name of a recipe and applying it to something that does not deserve it. Look at the recipes for ďCrab SaladĒ that use imitation crab......thatís not crab salad, thatís fish salad.

Or a vegetarian hamburger....no, thatís (loosely) a vegetable burger, but strictly where ďburgerĒ means beef, you would have to call the vegetarian version a vegetable patty. Or what about the ďindoor grillĒ that are pans with ridges. Thatís not grilling, thatís pan searing/frying/sautťing, but not grilling at all. So, thatís what I think happened here....someone at WW took the well known name of Coq Au Vin and applied it to a dish of chicken cooked in some kind of pale liquid.....which technically makes it a Coq Au Bouillon of sorts and not Coq Au Vin.

And why do they call it a hamburger......there is no ham in it. And letís not get started on hot dogs!
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Old 08-29-2007, 01:57 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by keltin View Post
...And why do they call it a hamburger......there is no ham in it. And letís not get started on hot dogs!

And there's no Coke in coq au vin
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Old 08-29-2007, 02:02 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
And there's no Coke in coq au vin
But there IS blood in Blood Pudding!
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