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Old 11-14-2005, 07:22 AM   #1
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ISO Moist Cake help

one of my best talents in the cooking field is making cakes or so they say,
anyway the only flaw in my cakes are that they come out to dry...not moist enough like in the shops.
so can ppl give me tips on how to make them more moist and possibly get them to rise more, as my cakes also tend to come out of the oven really big but end up losing all its air and size

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Old 11-14-2005, 08:59 AM   #2
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Are you baking them too long? following a tried and true recipe?
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Old 11-14-2005, 10:04 AM   #3
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This site contains loads of useful tips and suggestions on making desserts. It saved my hiney more than one time... worth a look!!

http://www.baking911.com/cakes/101.htm
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Old 11-14-2005, 10:33 AM   #4
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Things that will dry out a cake -

- Beating the eggs in too long (this would also account for the cake falling as it cools - you've put too much air in the batter).

- Oven temp not calibrated; if the recipe says 350, that's what you should use!

- Cake pans on top 2/3 of the oven; I always use the bottom shelf of the oven to bake cakes.

- Always use the ingredients the recipe calls for - ie, if it says butter, then use butter, not margarine. Make sure your eggs are the size called for in the recipe; if not stated, then use large. Using extra-large or medium eggs is asking for disasters! :)
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Old 11-14-2005, 08:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalady
Things that will dry out a cake -

- Beating the eggs in too long (this would also account for the cake falling as it cools - you've put too much air in the batter).

- Oven temp not calibrated; if the recipe says 350, that's what you should use!

- Cake pans on top 2/3 of the oven; I always use the bottom shelf of the oven to bake cakes.

- Always use the ingredients the recipe calls for - ie, if it says butter, then use butter, not margarine. Make sure your eggs are the size called for in the recipe; if not stated, then use large. Using extra-large or medium eggs is asking for disasters! :)
oh gosh, i don't do any of those things...i have a tendency to beat the eggs for a long time, so in regards to that when i add the flour afterwards how long should i beat it, cuz i like to beat it for a long time

i always turn the oven temp abt 250 degrees celsius for abt the first 10 mins and then turn it down to its required temp

i always use margarine instead of butter, how would that effect the cake's result

and i also tend to want to put the cake in the highest shelf, so do u suggest to put it lower?
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Old 11-18-2005, 07:22 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marissa82
oh gosh, i don't do any of those things...i have a tendency to beat the eggs for a long time, so in regards to that when i add the flour afterwards how long should i beat it, cuz i like to beat it for a long time

i always turn the oven temp abt 250 degrees celsius for abt the first 10 mins and then turn it down to its required temp

i always use margarine instead of butter, how would that effect the cake's result

and i also tend to want to put the cake in the highest shelf, so do u suggest to put it lower?
Beat the eggs only for as long as the recipe says, and at the speed the recipe says. Different cakes require different techniques to develop the airiness; some say to beat the eggs for 3-4 minutes; others will just have you incorporate the eggs into the dry.

Set the oven temp to - again - what the recipe says; if you're putting the cake in at a hotter temp than the recipe calls for, the cake is rising too fast in the oven, causing it to fall later.

Margarines don't react the same way butter does in a batter, and some of them contain quite a bit of water, which could affect the texture and 'rise' of the cake.

The highest shelf is where the most heat is (heat rises); again this could contribute to the rapid rise of the cake, and its subsequent fall.

When in doubt - follow the recipe; at least until you're comfortable enough with basic baking principles to experiment a little on your own.
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Old 11-20-2005, 03:01 PM   #7
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I have found that adding an extra 2 tbs. cooking oil to any batter will result in a superior texture, that is, more moist and tender. Also, to give cake more rising ower, rely more on the leavening agent (baking soda/acid or baking powder) to cuase the cake to rise rather than on the air beaten into the batter. I usually add 1 extra tsp. of baking powder to the recipe. However, by adding the extra baking powder, that cake may not have enough substance to hold together well when sliced. My cakes have actually come out too tender so that they wont' hold togeter when sliced. To counteract that, I add 1 extra egg to the recipe. By making these modifications, my cakes come out extra moist, and tender.

Don't be afraid to experiment. Cakes are not as complex as many people believe. Once you understand how different ingredients contribute to the final quality of the cake, you can pretty much create your own cakes, using just a basic ratio of four-fat-leavening.

And remember that leavening can be produced by using baking soda (alkali) and cream of tartar (acid), or baking soda (alkali) and yougurt or buttermilik (acid), or acidic fruits and juices such as apple, pineapple, strawberries, basically any fruit with a sour componant, and baking soda. The final leavening agent for cakes is baking powder that has both the acid and alkali ingredients together. I prefer double-acting baking powder as it starts to leaven the batter as soon as it is made wet, and then has a second leavening action that doesn't start until heat is applied. This results in a lighter final product.

Cakes are simply oversized pancakes with flavorings and more sweetener. And remember, that if you add the normal ingrediants, plus acidic fruits, or even more cocoa powder (again it's acidic) you will need to add more alkali (baking powder) to ballance the chemical ratios.

After that, it's a piece of cake(pun fully intended).

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 11-29-2005, 12:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marissa82
So can ppl give me tips on how to make them more moist and possibly get them to rise more, as my cakes also tend to come out of the oven really big but end up losing all its air and size
I find turning off the oven and leaving the door cracked with the cake in the oven helps with the falling problem.

Cameron
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Old 11-30-2005, 03:57 PM   #9
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You can also add a grated apple to most cakes to make it more moist without impacting the rest of the recipe.
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Old 11-30-2005, 10:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
I have found that adding an extra 2 tbs. cooking oil to any batter will result in a superior texture, that is, more moist and tender. Also, to give cake more rising ower, rely more on the leavening agent (baking soda/acid or baking powder) to cuase the cake to rise rather than on the air beaten into the batter. I usually add 1 extra tsp. of baking powder to the recipe. However, by adding the extra baking powder, that cake may not have enough substance to hold together well when sliced. My cakes have actually come out too tender so that they wont' hold togeter when sliced. To counteract that, I add 1 extra egg to the recipe. By making these modifications, my cakes come out extra moist, and tender.

Don't be afraid to experiment. Cakes are not as complex as many people believe. Once you understand how different ingredients contribute to the final quality of the cake, you can pretty much create your own cakes, using just a basic ratio of four-fat-leavening.

And remember that leavening can be produced by using baking soda (alkali) and cream of tartar (acid), or baking soda (alkali) and yougurt or buttermilik (acid), or acidic fruits and juices such as apple, pineapple, strawberries, basically any fruit with a sour componant, and baking soda. The final leavening agent for cakes is baking powder that has both the acid and alkali ingredients together. I prefer double-acting baking powder as it starts to leaven the batter as soon as it is made wet, and then has a second leavening action that doesn't start until heat is applied. This results in a lighter final product.

Cakes are simply oversized pancakes with flavorings and more sweetener. And remember, that if you add the normal ingrediants, plus acidic fruits, or even more cocoa powder (again it's acidic) you will need to add more alkali (baking powder) to ballance the chemical ratios.

After that, it's a piece of cake(pun fully intended).

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Have you posted one of your recipes?
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