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Old 09-28-2005, 10:47 PM   #11
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Good idea there...that could call for interesting times :D.

By the way...I've never heard of the indentation technique before. Is that something all of you cooking experts do?

Sorry for all the questions...these techniques are just so fascinating haha
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Old 09-29-2005, 08:29 AM   #12
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Yeah I always do the indent thing. Burgers will rise higher in the middle and sort of get more of a spherical shape (well not quite) as opposed to a patty shape. By putting an indent in the middle (on both side) this give extra room for the middle to rise, but still stay in a patty shape.

When I make burgers I usually make them at least a half pound. I do not use any fillers or binders like the egg and breadcrumbs you mentioned. I just use seasonings (garlic powder, onion powder, celery salt, chili powder, smoked Spanish paprika, chipotle pepper, salt, pepper, whatsthishere sauce, and a number of other things or any combination of these). I would think you probably could do the same for a full pound. I would go with the sear and then finish in the oven method and check with a thermometer.
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Old 09-29-2005, 12:41 PM   #13
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For 1 pound of fairly lean ground meat I would use a couple TBS to mix the paste on a cutting board (3 large cloves of garlic, 6 TBS or more of Worcestershire) then I would add an addition 1/4 cup of olive oil. I'd use a good half of a bottle of creamstyle horseradish jar. After you have everything mixed smell it - it it doesn't have a strong horseradish smell or Worcestershire smell add some more. You will probably end up using a whole jar of the horseradish and maybe 3 more TBS of worcestershire - I just shake until the meat changes color.

I hope those guidelines help you.
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Old 09-29-2005, 04:05 PM   #14
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Thanks a bunch, I have a much better idea of how to approach this "project" now.
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Old 09-29-2005, 04:44 PM   #15
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The mushrooms, swiss, and caramelized onions make me swoon! lol This is a favorite burger at a local restaurant and they serve it on nice thick slices of sour dough bread - and the even "bester" part is you can order them really rare!
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Old 09-29-2005, 05:19 PM   #16
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Hot peppers always go good with a hamburger.
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Old 09-29-2005, 05:38 PM   #17
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How could I resist this challenge! Ok. So here's how I'd approach this monster. First, you will need something with sufficent surface area to flip this baby. But we'll get to that. Let's first form the patty.

Forget the bread crumbs unless you want a meat loaf or salisbury steak flavor. Do add the egg. It will help reduce shrinkage and keep the burger jucier. Use one large egg per pound of ground beef.

When shaping the patty, to it in the pan you are going to cook it in, or on a plate. Do indent the center as the middle does rise due to contracting protien. You aren't so much worried about the shape as you are making sure the meat is cooked as thoroughly in the center as it is on the rim. Indenting the center will take care of that.

Dont be afraid to season the meat. A light sprinkling of salt on the outside will not dry it out. Over-cooking will dry it out. And as you stated, use a meat thermometer and cook to a minimum temp of 165 degrees F.

The reason you want to make the patty in the pan you will cook it in is that you can then use that pan to flip the burger into a second pan when you need to. I would start the burger on top of the stove, with a lid on it. When the pan is hot, cook for five minutes on one side. While it's cooking, get the second pan hot. Remove the lid from the first pan and carefully flip into the second, lightly oiled pan, taking care not to splash yourself with hot juices. Again cover and cook for five minutes with the lid on. Remove the lid and check the middle temperature with an instant read thermometer. If it reads 160 degrees, your ready for the next step. If you need to cook it longer, do so for another five minutes or so, again covered. Once you bring the meat center up to temperature, place the burger under the broiler for about three minutes to brown. Flip once more into the other pan and broil another three minutes. REmove by flipping the whole burger onto your giant "bun" and top with a buch of tommato, pickles, relish, mustard, onions, whatever you like. Serve open faced on a platter with the top bun sitting beside the burger.

To grill this baby, make the bruger on a plate, again indenting the middle. Fire up the grill with divided banks of charcoal, or only gas burner lit, for the indirect heat method. When the fire is hot, flip the burger onto the grill with the plate, over the coolest part of the grill. Insert a meat thermometer into the burger center, about half-way through and cook as you would a small beef roast, covered of course. Use a flat, metal cooking sheet to flip the burger. Cook until the meat reaches 165 degrees. Remove to a plate and flip onto the bun as previously described.

This burger, cooked by either method should be very juicy, and can very in weight from 1 to 5 pounds. The methods should allow you to make the burger whatever size you want.

The single biggest reason for ruined burgers, is making them the roound shape, IMHO. When the diameter is small compared to the thickness, the outer meat, along with the perimiter becomes dried out by the time the center is thick. For a 4 inch diameter burger, figure a thickness of no more than 1/2 inch. For larger burgers, increase the thickness accordingly. That way, you don't overcook one part before the middle is safely done.

Let us know how you decided to cook your monster burger, and how it turned out. I can't wait to hear.

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Old 10-01-2005, 12:33 PM   #18
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Niiice, this monster burger project will take place two saturdays from today. I would do it next Saturday, but that's my birthday...so it seems like people have other plans for me :O. These ideas really helped me put the "project" in perspective, and with my handy dandy new thermometer things should work out just fine.
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Old 10-16-2005, 04:54 AM   #19
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Well, it's two Saturdays from my previous post, and I made the monster burger today! It was 1.5 pounds, and the patty turned out very nice. I combined the advice of all you guys who wrote extensive posts(kitchenelf, goodweed -- thanks!). I ended up using 80/20 ground chuck. From there, I created a paste out of five minced garlic cloves, olive oil, and kosher salt. Mashed that up nice and good with two tablespoons...then from there I added only two tablespoons of horseradish, and three tablespoons of worcestershire. Mixed it all up with an egg as well...then formed it into a patty with an indentation in the middle. I seared it on both sides, 2 minutes each, in an iron-cast skillet. From there, I stuck it into an oven at 375 degrees for about 12-15 minutes. It came out a perfect medium/medium rare...and the burger itself was topped with tomatoes, lettuce, caramelized onions/mushrooms/swiss, and goat cheese. The bread we used was a middle eastern flatbread, which wrapped around the large patty nicely. It was definitely a great burger. Ah yes, I forgot to say that for added moisture, I took about 2 tablespoons of butter, broke it up into little pieces, and mushed that around in the ground beef as well. When it cooked, the butter melted and flowed throughout the burger...muaha.

Once again, thanks a lot...I shared this burger with four friends. We had homemade onion rings on the side.
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Old 10-16-2005, 08:37 PM   #20
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And now I must bow ever so humbly, to the king of monster burgers, the burgermeister supreme, all hail, Turkeyman!

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