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Old 04-06-2006, 04:46 PM   #11
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This is an absolute favorite one I developed for my husband. It is nearly identical to my mother's veal goulash, except for the substitution of chicken for the veal. Enjoy.

CHICKEN HUNGARIAN GOULASH

1 pound (about 2 or 3) boneless skinless chicken breasts or boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into bite-size pieces
Extra-virgin oil
1 onion, peeled & chopped
3 cloves of garlic, peeled & crushed
1 stalk of celery, chopped
1 cup dry white wine
1 cup chicken broth
1 can (14-15 oz) diced tomatoes
1 bay leaf
Freshly ground black pepper (or hot Hungarian paprika) & salt to taste
1 8-oz. can sauerkraut
1 8-oz. container sour cream
Cooked buttered egg noodles for serving

Coat bottom of large coverable skillet with olive oil. Brown chicken pieces lightly for a few minutes. Add onions, garlic, & celery & cook for about 5 minutes more, being careful not to let garlic brown/burn. Add wine, broth, tomatoes, & bay leaf. Cover & simmer for 15-20 minutes or until chicken pieces are cooked thru. Remove cover & continue simmering until heated thru & liquid has reduced to a stew-like consistency. Remove bay leaf & stir in sauerkraut, heating thru. Add freshly ground black pepper (or hot paprika) & salt to taste. Remove from heat & stir in sour cream. Taste again for seasoning. Serve over cooked buttered egg noodles.
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Old 04-06-2006, 05:05 PM   #12
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Michael, we called it slum gullion at our house to, and my mother made it exactly the same way yours did, with the exception of the garlic. The only garlic I ever saw around our house was garlic salt.
I Haven't had any slum gullion in years...sounds good. I'll have to make some soon.
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Old 04-06-2006, 05:14 PM   #13
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My Dad used to make the Americanized version of goulash or slum gullion at hunting camp. His version was very similar to both Michael's and Andy's, except that he made it a bit more saucy by adding tomato paste, along with basil and bay-leaf. It was great.

Sadly, either my taste buds have changed, or I just can't get the mixture right. Though I can make far more dishes, and know my way around a spice-rack better than he ever did, I can't match his goulash. It was something special, and was always requested at hunting camp.

My Mom's on the other hand, was simply the elbow macaroni with stewed tomatoes, onion, and black pepper. It filled the belly, but didn't really excite the pallate. But her baked beans, and her chile, now that was a different story altogether.

My suggestion is to follow either Michael's or Andy's recipe, and then add various seasonings to make it your very own. You just might surprise yourself and come up with something great.

Possible additions include saute'd mushrooms, oregano, basil, thyme, chili powder, yellow mustard, cloves, cayenne pepper, or your favorite bottled hot sauce, liquid smoke, sausage, fennel, garlic, chopped black olives, pepperoni slices, grated swiss, muenster, cheddar, provolone, or mozzarella cheese, or whatever you can imagine that would taste good with the tomatoes and pasta.

Be creative with it. And don't add everything from the above list at the same time. Just remember the tried and true addage; add a little spice or herb at a time, let it cook in for ten minutes before tasting, then correct the seasoning if required. You can always add more flavoring, but once it's in the pot, you can't remove it.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

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Old 04-06-2006, 08:12 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I must be naive about goulash. I had no idea it was also a dish like slum gullion which is called American Chop Suey around here.

Oh, well. If you want a Hungarian/Austrian Goulash recipe, see above.

If you want a Slum Gullion/American Chop Suey, American Goulash recipe, see below:


American Chop Suey

1 Lb Ground Beef
1 Ea Onion
1 Ea Green Pepper
2 Cl Garlic
3 Tb Tomato Paste
28 Oz Canned Tomato
2 C Elbow Macaroni

Brown the beef in a sauté pan over medium high heat. Remove it from the pan. Pour off all but two tablespoons of fat.

Sauté the onion, pepper and garlic in the remaining fat until softened.

Add the paste and sauté for an additional 3 minutes.

Add the tomato and the meat to the sautéed vegetables. Simmer for 15-20 minutes.

Prepare the pasta according to package directions.

When the pasta is cooked, drain off the water and mix the pasta with the vegetable and meat mixture. Cook together for 2-3 minutes to allow the flavor of the sauce to cook into the pasta.

Serve with grated cheese.
Interesting! This is nothing at all like the chop suey recipe I grew up with (Mine uses stew beef, onions, mushrooms, celery, soy sauce, and molasses, and is served on rice). It is interesting how we all have such different names for the same foods.

Barbara
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Old 04-07-2006, 09:23 AM   #15
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turned out a winner

I used
1.5lbs ground beef
1 large can of tomatoe sauce
1 large can of diced tomatoes
1.5 large onions
1 cup carrots
1 cup celery
about two cups beef broth
garlic
ground black pepper
after browning and draining the meat I put all the above
in a high crock pot and let it stew for about 3 hours then
added cooked elbow macaroni. Served with Italian bread.

My family loved it and said this is a good one to make again.

Thanks for all your help
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Old 04-07-2006, 10:25 AM   #16
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Wow!

This would have to be one of my favorite (one pot) dishes. Yes, I do it all in one pot, it takes longer. I never would have thought of all the variations of this recipe! I will share mine, which was handed down to me by mom and pops. It is very basic but with one slight difference (the beans):

1 lb ground beef browned season with salt and pepper
Elbow macaroni - as much as you like (some folks like more pasta, some like more meat)
Onion (I don't measure onion or garlic, just add to my liking)
garlic
1 can of stewed tomatos
1 can of tomato sauce
1 can of tomato paste
1 can of dark red kidney beans

Season salt, black pepper and a touch of red pepper flakes to give it a bite. Sometimes I add a bit of water to get a bit more gravy.... pasta tends to soak it all up!

Heat through and serve.
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Old 04-07-2006, 10:39 AM   #17
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That sounds good - but isn't it more of a chili dish? Same with the "Chop Suey". How is that a "goulash"?

I thought the original poster was looking for just goulash recipes, but maybe I read wrong.

Except for serving atop egg noodles, I've never heard of an authentic goulash that was cooked with macaroni & didn't have sour cream.
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Old 04-07-2006, 10:46 AM   #18
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One difference in my mom's slumgullion that I see is that she used spaghetti instead of elbow macaroni.
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Old 04-07-2006, 11:05 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
That sounds good - but isn't it more of a chili dish? Same with the "Chop Suey". How is that a "goulash"?

I thought the original poster was looking for just goulash recipes, but maybe I read wrong.

Except for serving atop egg noodles, I've never heard of an authentic goulash that was cooked with macaroni & didn't have sour cream.
I am not sure if that is directed at me or not, but that is the recipe I grew up with as little girl... not sure what else to say except that maybe it is the Southerners Goulash...... call it what you like.
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Old 04-07-2006, 11:19 AM   #20
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Don't worry sattie. There are many many ways of cooking dishes. Some call it one name, others call it something totally different. It shouldn't be a debate on what is the "REAL" way of doing a dish. This site is for getting the different ways that people all over the world make things.
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