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Old 02-26-2008, 11:42 AM   #21
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One time the DW marinated in coconut milk, cayenne pepper, lime, and garlic using the same method. The result? The ribeye was even silkier and delightful than usual. Certainly a treat.
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Old 02-26-2008, 11:53 AM   #22
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Medium rare, a bit of sea salt and fresh cracked pepper, drizzle of olive oil and slap on a grill or hot cast iron skillet. That is for most cuts like ribeye, delmonico, filet, and what not. Keep it simple! Occasionally I will put a dab of garlic butter or Boursin cheese atop of the filet or ribeye, chili butter for the strip.
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Old 02-26-2008, 12:00 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by stinemates View Post
That's interesting. Does it have a different taste doing it that way? Any reason??? :)
it`s not Taste, it`s Simply that adding salt before or during cooking will leech out some moisture and keep it leaking out.
I like this kept to a Minimum so I get to eat it all.
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Old 02-26-2008, 12:06 PM   #24
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it`s not Taste, it`s Simply that adding salt before or during cooking will leech out some moisture and keep it leaking out.
I like this kept to a Minimum so I get to eat it all.
If you salt the meat immediately before cooking, any liquid extraction by the salt would be minimized. Also, food salted before cooking will taste different from the same food only salted after cooking.
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Old 02-26-2008, 12:10 PM   #25
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I am assuming you use wood only, then? Gas powered grills would have the same effect indoor :)
If I'm in a hurry (which is not often)I use my Weber Q otherwise I use my Weber Kettle grill using charcoal and wood chunks. The gas Q isn't as good as the kettle grill but it still gives off a charcoal flavor unike using an indoor oven. The steaks coming off the kettle grill are unbelievably good with a dark, seared crust. I gotta stop thinking about this.

But I gotta add this note: I never freeze my steaks. I buy them the day I will eat them because I've noticed that freezing the meat seems to take something away from it. Fresh steaks are much more tender and juicier.
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Old 02-26-2008, 12:10 PM   #26
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I like the outside (charred bit) to be salty, but the raw flesh and blood to be natural, and just at blood temperature.

it`s a "personal taste" thing though I guess :)
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Old 02-26-2008, 12:23 PM   #27
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If you salt the meat immediately before cooking, any liquid extraction by the salt would be minimized. Also, food salted before cooking will taste different from the same food only salted after cooking.
I agree with the above. In addition, salting a while before (known as dry brining) can give you a very juicy result as well. Initially some liquid will be drawn out, but then it will disolve the salt and eventually be drawn back into the meat seasoning both the ouside and the inside while retaining most of the juices.
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Old 02-26-2008, 12:39 PM   #28
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I agree with the above. In addition, salting a while before (known as dry brining) can give you a very juicy result as well. Initially some liquid will be drawn out, but then it will disolve the salt and eventually be drawn back into the meat seasoning both the ouside and the inside while retaining most of the juices.
I tried the "dry brining" a while back on 1/2 of a Flank steak. The other half nothing but salt & pepper prior to the grill. Everyone agreed the "brined" half was the best! It does/will work.
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Old 02-26-2008, 12:48 PM   #29
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UB, I tried that also, and my results differ, I ended up with Way more liquid going into the Griddle pan (that also made plenty smoke too!) and without doing any salt you can hardly tell the griddle pan has been used!

I`ll stick to my way ;)
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Old 02-26-2008, 01:06 PM   #30
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I agree with the above. In addition, salting a while before (known as dry brining) can give you a very juicy result as well. Initially some liquid will be drawn out, but then it will disolve the salt and eventually be drawn back into the meat seasoning both the ouside and the inside while retaining most of the juices.

Well, I didn't know there was a name for it, but that's how I do mine, they are always juicy and I don't have to set the salt or the pepper on the table
YT, you are depriving a good piece of garlic bread some fine juices drinking them ahead of time But to each his own....
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