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Old 01-17-2008, 09:00 AM   #1
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Country-style ribs

I was able to find bone in country style ribs for $.99/lb at our local grocery, so I bought a bunch.

I'd like to do some in the oven, and am wondering if low heat (225-250) until they reach 200 degrees or so works as well for country style ribs as it does for spare ribs.

Any guess at how much time I'm looking at for 3 or 4 lbs of ribs?

Thanks.

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Old 01-17-2008, 10:41 AM   #2
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No idea on the time. They will cook fast if they are single ribs though. If you chop off the thick top section and chine bone, you'll have St Louis ribs.
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Old 01-17-2008, 11:08 AM   #3
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I usually cook 4-5 country style ribs and I'm sure it wasn't for longer than 1-1/2 hours at 300. Maybe closer to an hour. Season, in a glass pan with a little bit of water and a lid..... good stuff. The water evaporates out by that time and is replaced with juice. They brown up nicely. I don't think I cook any meat up to 200F, but that's just me.
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Old 01-17-2008, 11:26 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mozart View Post
I was able to find bone in country style ribs for $.99/lb at our local grocery, so I bought a bunch.

I'd like to do some in the oven, and am wondering if low heat (225-250) until they reach 200 degrees or so works as well for country style ribs as it does for spare ribs.

Any guess at how much time I'm looking at for 3 or 4 lbs of ribs?

Thanks.
No matter what meat you are cooking, or how you cook it, if you take it to 200 degrees F it will be dry. Pork doesn't need to be cooked beyond 150, and even the conservative FDA doesn't recommend a temp beyond 170, which to me is "dead and buried, and dry, dry, dry."
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Old 01-17-2008, 11:32 AM   #5
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I like to cook them in liquid, then coat them with BBQ sauce or rub and
crisp them up under the broiler.
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Old 01-17-2008, 11:39 AM   #6
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For reference, this is what the country ribs look like around here. I have no idea about the poundage, I guess I don't pay attention to that either These were cooked on the grill though. Probably around an hour. Indirect first, then direct once they were ready for the sauce.
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Old 01-17-2008, 11:53 AM   #7
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Yum, mozart. I love country-style ribs. One of my family's favorite ways to eat them is to brown them up nice and add them to our spaghetti sauce recipe. They give the sauce a great flavor and are so tender when done. I like them better than meatballs.
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Old 01-17-2008, 12:14 PM   #8
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Since you, or rather your grocer used the term "Country Style Ribs" they were either cut from the blade end of the loin or more likely "created" from the butt....If that's the case then in I would place them in a dish with some BBQ sauce, cover tightly with foil at 325*... At 1 1/2 to 2 hours check for doneness. Then proceed to whatever else ya wanna do to them.

Have Fun!
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Old 01-17-2008, 12:56 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Since you, or rather your grocer used the term "Country Style Ribs" they were either cut from the blade end of the loin or more likely "created" from the butt....If that's the case then in I would place them in a dish with some BBQ sauce, cover tightly with foil at 325*... At 1 1/2 to 2 hours check for doneness. Then proceed to whatever else ya wanna do to them.

Have Fun!
Hi Bob,

Country-style ribs are an actual cut of pork and not a grocer term. They come from the upper side of the rib cage and do indeed come from the fatty blade end of the loin.

In another post about oven spareribs you said "How about set your rubbed ribs on a pan...Set your oven at 225*....and pop in the oven.
Pull them when they reach 190* or so. When they get close to the 190* apply your sauce. If you want to you could baste them along the way.....Hope this will help"

That was my basis for saying about 200 degrees before taking them out.

So my question was, do these type of ribs benefit from very slow roasting the same way spareribs and baby back ribs do, or should I cook them at higher heat for shorter time.

I'm thinking the consensus so far has been the latter, but I have become a big fan of low heat, longer time cooking for a lot of meats, so I was wondering about this cut in particular.

Thanks.
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Old 01-17-2008, 01:35 PM   #10
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"Country Style Ribs" created from the boston butt, and labeled as Country Style Ribs are a grocer/retailer term not a cut of pork. Obviously they are not ribs! A true Country Style rib is prepared form the blade end of a bone-in pork loin and shall consist of not less than three or more than six ribs. So what do you have...a true Country Style Rib or a created rib cut from the boston butt??????? That will determine your method of cooking.

Spare ribs are another story. Slow, low temperature cooking to 190* is (one) good method.

The "Created" from the Boston Butt "ribs" benefit from the same method(s) as whole boston butts...Again low and slow. Obviously the time will be less for faux "ribs" due the portion size.

If you have true Country Style Ribs then either way... broiling/grilling will work. Look for 145-150* Also you can BBQ slowly...225* for 2 to 4 hours. Both methods will work..I personally prefer cookingl them on the BBQ to the 145-150* range being careful not to dry the meat out!


Enjoy!
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