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Old 10-24-2005, 09:39 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DugDbold
Andy M... I sure hope that wasn't the same mop you used for the floor...??? :]

You're assuming I mop the floor...
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Old 10-24-2005, 09:51 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DugDbold
Andy M... I sure hope that wasn't the same mop you used for the floor...??? :]
Some folks doing BBQ will periodcally apply a basting liquid during the smoking/cooking process. Check out the recipe I posted a link to for an example. A mop is used to apply that basting liquid. It's a lot smaller than the one I should be using to clean the floor.
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Old 10-24-2005, 09:52 AM   #23
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RESULTS

OK,
So here is what happened. It turned out OK for my first time making a shoulder, but it took much longer than I thought so I had to work around it. Any suggestions on how to do it better next time, please let me know. I have put some pictures of the process below.

First the night before I put a dry rub onto the shoulder, they didn't have pork butt so I had to get the shoulder. Then I let the rub sit on it through the night.

The next morning around 11am I put into the bottom of the pan a mixture of beer, orange juice, cut up apples, and liquid smoke. Then I placed the roast on top of the fruit.

Then I turned on the oven to 225-250 and basted the roast until 9pm. (This is the first picture). I then cut into the pork and it wasn't close to being done. Since we were going out that night I had to end up covering the roast and putting it into the frige overnight.

Then the next morning I cut the pork into large pieces since I had already made a huge cut into it and make more basting liquid adding a touch of worcestershire. Then put it back into the oven and let is simmer for about 5 more hours. (This is the 2nd picture).

Then it was finally done and pulling apart we were able to eat Sunday night. All in all the flavors were really good and tasted great it was just different then what I was thinking of. I think the orange ended up being a little strong. If I had had more liquid smoke I would have added it, but I ran out.

http://img460.imageshack.us/my.php?i...houlder1cv.jpg
http://img460.imageshack.us/my.php?i...kinoven4fn.jpg
http://img454.imageshack.us/my.php?i...kfordad4xt.jpg
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Old 10-24-2005, 10:00 AM   #24
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It's fun to do, isn't it?

First, get a meat thermometer so you don't have to cut into it.

Now, you have a better idea how long it can take to cook, you can plan better the next time. Thre are a ton of recipes for rubs and mop liquids for you to use if you're not happy with the one you had.

From the picture, it looks like you did a ham rather than a shoulder. A ham has a much bigger bone so will cook at a different rate.

When you do a butt, you can get it bone-in or boneless.

Try it again.
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Old 10-24-2005, 10:11 AM   #25
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Thanks Andy.

I do need to get a meat thermomoter when I get a chance. I haven't really had the need for one in the past.

The meat was definitly a shoulder. It probably wasn't the best cut of meat though. My grocery store doesn't have a huge selection.
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Old 10-24-2005, 10:13 AM   #26
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Thanks Andy

I do need to get a meat themomoter when I get a chance. I just haven't had the need for one in the past.

The cut of meat was definitly a shoulder. It probably wasn't a very good cut though, my grocery store doesn't have a large selection.
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Old 10-24-2005, 10:24 AM   #27
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Remember that while it's called a "butt", it's actually the shoulder. That funky-shaped bone is actually the shoulder blade. It almost looks like you have a "Boston Butt", which is a bit smaller and chunkier than a full-size butt.

Something else to consider, is that when you actually smoke meat, it's really a moist-heat, low-temp cooking method. Moist-heat cooking methods are what break down the connective tissues over time. If you want to do this in your home oven, you really should do this covered, either in a covered roasting pan, or covering your cast iron skillet with aluminum foil. This traps the steam released during cooking, and helps to break down the connective tissues.

I do a combination method when I smoke a pork butt. I start out in the smoker, and will smoke it for 5 hours or so. Then, because I usually have other things to do, I'll heat up the oven to 250F, bring in the pork butt, wrap it completely in plastic wrap, then in foil, and place that on a sheet pan, and into the oven for 4 more hours or so. This traps all the moisture and steam next to the pork, and helps to break down the connective tissues. I usually end up doing a total cooking time of around 8 - 9 hours. I have yet to undercook a pork butt, as the bone has always just slipped right out of the meat when I remove the wrappings.
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Old 10-24-2005, 11:40 AM   #28
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Lightbulb

When it gets too cold for HB to fire up the smoker, I rub a boneless pork loin with some good southwest seasoning and put it in the crock pot with a beer. I let it cook until it's falling apart, shred it, and return it to the crockpot, add my favorite BBQ sauce to the juice in the pot and let it simmer for a while longer. I am personally not big on liquid smoke, but you could use some if you wish.
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Old 10-24-2005, 01:16 PM   #29
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GB do you have a United Grocers or Cash & Carry near you? They are a warehouse that sells to local small business and they sell to the public (at least the one by me). They carry Cattlemens. May want to give it a try.
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Old 10-24-2005, 09:28 PM   #30
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The MOP....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Some folks doing BBQ will periodcally apply a basting liquid during the smoking/cooking process. Check out the recipe I posted a link to for an example. A mop is used to apply that basting liquid. It's a lot smaller than the one I should be using to clean the floor.
Whew, I'm glad to find that out. You had me worried with that "mop" reference.
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