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Old 04-18-2006, 08:01 AM   #41
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"you don't change diapers as much as they change you."

"Governments, like diapers, must be changed often and for the same reasons."
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Old 04-18-2006, 08:04 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Citizen Bob
I can't tell any noticable difference among New Mexico, Cascabel and Guajillo.
If that is the case then by all means use the less expensive peppers.
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Old 04-18-2006, 08:10 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
If that is the case then by all means use the less expensive peppers.
The recipe I am using now is orders of magnitude better tasting than anything I have ever used before, including the infamous Gebhardts.

Here's something worth considering:

http://tinyurl.com/pzp5p/

+++
2006 NewsMax.Com

Common Herbs May Fight Cancer

Two common herbs may one day be used as weapons in the war against cancer, according to resent research.

The studies show that ginger can kill ovarian cancer cells while the compound that makes peppers hot can shrink pancreatic tumors.

[snip]

The second study, done at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine found that capsaicin, the chemical that makes chili peppers hot, caused apoptosis death in the cells of pancreatic tumors in mice. "Capsaicin triggered the cancerous cells to die off and significantly reduced the size of the tumors," said Dr. Sanjay Srivastava, the lead researcher.

Both studies were presented at the recent meeting of the American Association of Cancer Research.
+++
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Old 04-25-2006, 11:37 AM   #44
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One thing that is confusing in recipes is when they call for so much "chili powder", what does that mean? Does it mean so much ground roasted chiles or does the so-called "chili powder" includes adjuncts like cumin, garlic, oregano, etc?

If I had 3 ground roasted chile powders, cascabel, ancho and chipotle, how much of each in tablespoons would you put with 2 lb meat and how much ground roasted cumin powder, granulated garlic powder, Mexican oregano and paprika - plus any others - would you add to the recipe?

2 lb beef-pork mix (2:1)
2 medium onions diced
1 qt. crushed tomatoes
1 qt. diced tomatoes
1 qt. beef broth
1 T. salt
__ T. ground roasted cascabel chile powder
__ T. ground roasted ancho chile powder
__ T. ground roasted chipotle chile powder
__ T. ground roasted cumin powder
__ T. Mexican oregano
__ t. paprika
__ Anything else, eg, sugar.

Brown beef and cook onions until translucent then add everything to a large crock pot and cook 6 hours on LOW including heat up time.
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Old 04-25-2006, 11:42 AM   #45
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Chili Powder includes other herbs and spices like cumin, garlic, and others like you mentioned.
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Old 04-25-2006, 11:48 AM   #46
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This can get confusing.

Chili powder (spelled with two "i") is the blend of spices GB mentioned.

Chile powder (powdered chiles) is just ground dried chile peppers.

Chili (the food) usually calls for ground chile and the other spices in chili powder. Using chili powder would simplify the process but limit you for flavors. If you add each ingredient separately, you can control the flavor of the dish.

I like your pepper mix and other spices. I'd add onion and garlic, either fresh or as powders (not salts) and some paprika. The chipotles will add a smoke flavor. You could also consider smoked paprika as a less hot option.
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Old 04-25-2006, 11:56 AM   #47
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Chili powder (with an "i") is a mixture of dried ground chiles (with an "e") -- usually anchos -- along with cumin, Mexican oregano and garlic. Sometimes salt.

It does not generally include paprika, which is Hungarian in origin and has a distinct taste. At least I do not recall ever having seen chili powder with paprika in it. Doesn't mean you couldn't use it.

The proportions you use depend on your taste. Commercially prepared versions generally use mostly ground chiles, with lesser amounts of (in descending order) cumin, garlic and oregano.

In your post, I would think a 3/1 ratio of chiles to cumin would work, with the addition of maybe 1t each of garlic powder and Mexican oregano. I would personally leave out paprika (IMO not the right taste in chili), but if you use it, start with a small amount and add up.

The chipotle pepper can be very strong, smoke-wise, so you might want to start small with that type and add more in as necessary.

Experiment by combining and see what suits your taste. You might want to even make up different versions for different needs.

Also think about adding unsweetened chocolate to your chili to deepen the flavor.
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Old 04-25-2006, 12:06 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I like your pepper mix and other spices. I'd add onion and garlic, either fresh or as powders (not salts) and some paprika.
In my haste I left out the garlic but I did include paprika. I did not include onion powder since I use diced onions in the recipe.

Chili Recipe
2 lb beef-pork mix (2:1)
2 medium onions diced
__ T. Chili powder (see below)
1 qt. crushed tomatoes
1 qt. diced tomatoes
1 qt. beef broth
1 T. salt

Chili Powder
__ T. ground roasted cascabel chile powder
__ T. ground roasted ancho chile powder
__ T. ground roasted chipotle chile powder
__ T. ground roasted cumin powder
__ T. granulated garlic powder
__ T. Mexican oregano
__ t. paprika
__ Anything else, eg, sugar.

What quantities should I use in both the recipe for chili and the recipe for chili powder?
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Old 04-25-2006, 12:10 PM   #49
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Take Jennys great suggestion and put in a square or two of unsweetened chocolate. It might sound weird, but it works wonders with chili. It does not make it tasty chocolaty at all either.
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Old 04-25-2006, 12:21 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
In your post, I would think a 3/1 ratio of chiles to cumin would work, with the addition of maybe 1t each of garlic powder and Mexican oregano. I would personally leave out paprika (IMO not the right taste in chili), but if you use it, start with a small amount and add up.
Is this what you mean:

1 T. cascabel powder
1 T. ancho powder
1 T. chipotle powder
1 T. cumin powder
1 t. garlic powder
1 t. Mexican oregano

No onion powder, no paprika, no other ingredients.

If this is what you meant, how much of that powder mix do I use with 2 lb of meat?

Quote:
Also think about adding unsweetened chocolate to your chili to deepen the flavor.
Please specify the exact product and the exact amount so I can buy it at the grocery. My wife usually shops for sweets so I am not familiar with the products.
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