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Old 10-23-2007, 09:09 AM   #1
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Maltodextrin in chicken breading?

I just received a spice blend, from a mail-order company, to add to flour for frying chicken.

Ingredients: Salt, MSG, Maltodextrin, spices, partially hydrogenated oil

Useage is "2 - 3 tablespoons for two cups AP flour".

While I am not thrilled about the MSG, I am puzzled by the maltodextrin. Is it there for sweetness? The Internet tells me it is also used as a thickener in baked goods.

Also, why would a dry spice mixture have/need partially hydrogenated oil in it?

Thanks,
Tom

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Old 10-23-2007, 09:55 AM   #2
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I think the maltodextrin is there for sweetness, and the starch (it's a starch). Maybe they anticipate people using it as is.

I hope they sent it to you gratis, as you could have made this without the MSG and maltodextrin at home.
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Old 10-23-2007, 11:22 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomW View Post
Also, why would a dry spice mixture have/need partially hydrogenated oil in it?
Because the spices (or something in that mix) were more than likely prepared or cooked using that oil, so they have to list it as an ingredient.
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Old 10-23-2007, 11:36 AM   #4
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Maltodextrin is a nonfermentable sugar. It doesn't provide a lot of sweetness, but contributes to "mouthfeel" and body in beers and such. I suspect it's there to serve the same purpose.

John
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Old 10-23-2007, 11:48 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomW View Post
I just received a spice blend, from a mail-order company, to add to flour for frying chicken.

Ingredients: Salt, MSG, Maltodextrin, spices, partially hydrogenated oil

Useage is "2 - 3 tablespoons for two cups AP flour".

While I am not thrilled about the MSG, I am puzzled by the maltodextrin. Is there for sweetness? The Internet tells me it is also used as a thickener in baked goods.

Also, why would a dry spice mixture have/need partially hydrogenated oil in it?

Thanks,
Tom
The dry spice mixture wouldn't need any of those questionable ingredients added to them. If you want good "clean" spice mixtures, you can order them custom blended to your specs from Vann's Spices. That's where I get all my dried herbs and spices.
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Old 10-23-2007, 12:11 PM   #6
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Why can't you just season the flour yourself ?????????
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Old 10-23-2007, 12:28 PM   #7
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you`ve tasted maltodexrin (and dextrin analogs) before and not even noticed it as such :)

ever licked the seal on a postage stamp or envelope?
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Old 10-23-2007, 12:36 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by YT2095 View Post
you`ve tasted maltodexrin (and dextrin analogs) before and not even noticed it as such :)

ever licked the seal on a postage stamp or envelope?
so, it won't kill you (maybe) but why would anyone WANT it in their food?
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Old 10-23-2007, 01:33 PM   #9
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There's nothing "evil" about maltodextrin. It's just a sugar compound that has certain properties that make it a useful additive (Such as the above mentioned mouthfeel/body).

It's not like some of the other products on the market that are completely man made - maltodextrin is a naturally occuring compund.

Now, I have to say that I wasn't real impressed the few times that I tried using it. It didn't have nearly the effect I wanted on the first batch of cider I ever made.

John
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