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Old 01-12-2014, 10:33 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
I wouldn't know the difference because I'm a newbie cook. It's helpful for me to get feedback about different types of cookware.
I understand, and I'm not trying to discourage you from asking questions. I'm just saying that different brands of cast iron cookware are not going to perform significantly differently.

Several people have said in this thread that they love their cast iron and probably none of them are the same brand. So if you've decided on cast iron, choose one based on the criteria that is most important to you: cost, appearance, pre-seasoned, whatever it is. It's not hard to learn to use it and take care of it, and it's pretty much indestructible, so nothing you do can hurt it
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Old 01-12-2014, 10:41 AM   #62
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Actually most cast iron you don't want to scrub in soapy water. I like my Le Creuset because of the enamel coating, which makes it easier to clean then non-coated cast iron.
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Old 01-12-2014, 10:58 AM   #63
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Actually most cast iron you don't want to scrub in soapy water. I like my Le Creuset because of the enamel coating, which makes it easier to clean then non-coated cast iron.

A properly seasoned pan is fine in soapy water. I do it often using a blue scrub sponge to clean it.
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Old 01-12-2014, 04:45 PM   #64
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A properly seasoned pan is fine in soapy water. I do it often using a blue scrub sponge to clean it.

If you wash the Lodge Logic pan that way do you have to re-season it?
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Old 01-12-2014, 05:16 PM   #65
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If you wash the Lodge Logic pan that way do you have to re-season it?

No. The seasoning is there to stay unless the pan is abused. Every time you cook something with a fat, it adds to the seasoning.

You shouldn't need soap and water every time. It's much like non-stick. After cooking, you just wipe it out. Put it back on the burner to heat it up and dry it off then wipe out any excess fat with a paper towel. Each time you do that, you add a little more to the seasoning

If you have stubborn residue and have to use soap and water, put the wet pan on the burner and heat it up to dry the water off, then wipe it with a few drops of oil and let that get hot. Then wipe out the excess and put it away (after it cools).

With normal use you should never have to re-season.
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Old 01-12-2014, 05:28 PM   #66
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It's not hard to learn to use it and take care of it, and it's pretty much indestructible, so nothing you do can hurt it

My Cast is old, old, old. It's really hard to hurt it.

They've been washed in everything imaginable over there lifetime. My Grandmother used to toss in in the fireplace when she wanted to really clean it.

They have also had everything imaginable cooked in them. Acidic tomatoes to pineapple upside down cake.

And she's poo-poo you if you mentioned "Brand names". A pan was a tool and if it worked then it was good to go. If you could get it cheaper then all the better.

Enjoy your choice whatever it ends up being.
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Old 01-12-2014, 05:39 PM   #67
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Thanks Andy. I'm liking the Lodge pan more and more!
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Old 01-12-2014, 05:58 PM   #68
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I did get some cast iron for a wedding present, back when iron was first discovered, and it was poor quality, with uneven thickness of the metal, and visible ridges where the pan was supposed to be flat. So there is bad cast iron out there.

As far as enameled cast iron, you need to be careful not to chip it by banging it around. The enamel is a kind of ceramic, and can be chipped. It can also craze if temperature shocked.

The point I'm making is that both cast iron, and enameled cast iron are durable, great working tools. But they do have limits.

I agree that once properly seasoned, cast iron can be washed, and lightly scrubbed with soap and a plastic scrubber without damaging the patina. However, should you remove the patina, say, with a steel wool scouring pad, you can re-season it fairly quickly. If you chip the enamel on it's cousin, that can't be fixed.

Another tip about cast iron, and I may have said this previously, cast iron is a poor heat conductor (and poor electrical conductor as far as metals go). To get even heating accross the surface, the thicker pans will work better. But it takes a bit of preheating for the temperature to even out over the cooking surface. The thicker pans also have more thermal mass, and so maintain a more even temperature when food is added or taken from the pan, making them great for cooking meals where the pan is used for multiple pieces of food, such as stir fries, chicken, pork chopps (like enough for a family), pancakes, etc.

Steel is similar in its heat characteristics to cast iron. This includes stainless steel, which is why they are often joined to an aluminum or copper basses. The heat conductivity of the base spreads the heat evenly across the ferrous pan, giving you a more evenly heated cooking surface.

Bonus, it is that poor electrical conductivity, or resistance, in steels and iron that cause them to heat so well with induction burners. As eddy currents caused by induction move around in the pan, they cause the pan to heat due to that resistance. Both copper and aluminum conduct electricity to easily, and therefore generate much less heat due to eddy currents.

All pans, aluminum, copper, steel, mineral steel, SS, cast iron, enamled cast iron, even borosilicate glass pots have advantages and disadvantages. They all will cook your food. My personal preference is cast iron. I know people who love anodized aluminum, with others who swear by ceramic coated non-stick pans.

I just remember scrubbing cast iron with sand and water from the beach, throwing on the fire to dry it, and knowing it could stand any abuse I could throw at it, except for extreme thermal shock. Plus, I remember a few good steaks and burgers cooked up over a camp fire, under a massive tree-fort made by me and a very good friend, when we were teens. Cast iron has good memories attached to it for me, including memories of my parents, grandparents, etc. It gives me a connection to those who came before me. Plus, it just works.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-12-2014, 06:23 PM   #69
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I did get some cast iron for a wedding present, back when iron was first discovered, and it was poor quality, with uneven thickness of the metal, and visible ridges where the pan was supposed to be flat. So there is bad cast iron out there.

Cast iron has good memories attached to it for me, including memories of my parents, grandparents, etc. It gives me a connection to those who came before me. Plus, it just works.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Yes there is bad cast out there but not as much as there used to be. Most cast today is very acceptable.

As far as memories and connections to the past. I'm with you there 100%.

But your best statement is...."Plus, it just works." That's what matters.
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Old 01-14-2014, 02:16 PM   #70
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I may be late on this. Not sure, but i have a Swiss Diamond grill pan and i love it. They have 2 and I went with the one with the deeper sides to help prevent spatter. There are many great features, but the best is the browning of this pan. It browns meat like a stainless pan, but cleans better than all other nonsticks.


Just my $.02



Here is a link - it looks as if it is on sale right now (Jan 14 2014)

Swiss Diamond Nonstick Deep Square Grill Pan - 11 x 11"
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