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Old 08-26-2009, 06:00 AM   #11
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Lightbulb brown paper

If you have kept your mushrooms in a brown paper properly, then certainly your mushrooms will stay their freshness and quality up to five days only... The temperature of your refrigerator should be in between of zero to two degree Celsius ( 0°C to 2°C ) or 32°F to 35.
When the mushroom oxidizes and turned brown this means that your mushroom are no longer fresh and good to consume..This is similar in the case of apple slices when left out in the table or any where else..
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Old 08-26-2009, 10:42 AM   #12
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The brown paper bag is the way to go........I picked some wild porcini
several weeks ago,....sliced them 1/2" thick and dehydrated them till
they were almost completed dryed,...kept them in a paper bag in a
cool dry place, pulled some out yesterday, soaked them about 10 min.
in cold water and they sauteed just as tho I'd just picked them...they
were excellent........I dunno if other types can be done the same way..
I've frozen (grifola florosa) Hen of the woods, indefinately, w/ similar
results........................................... ..........................................BH51
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Old 08-26-2009, 11:40 AM   #13
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If I have mushrooms that I know I will not use up within 1-2 days I will slice and dehydrate them. Then they are good almost forever and can be used in recipes as is or rehydrated first.

I love it when the stores mark down the price 50% or more on mushrooms due to the 'sell by' date. They are perfected fine and I bring home and dehydrate or if I really have a lot of them I will 'can' them.
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Old 08-26-2009, 12:08 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by papahassan17 View Post
If you have kept your mushrooms in a brown paper properly, then certainly your mushrooms will stay their freshness and quality up to five days only.
Sorry - I completely disagree. There are VERY few things having to do with food & cooking that are this definitive. VERY few. Like I stated in my previous post here, I've had mushrooms maintain their quaility & last for WEEKS in my fridge. If I went by your standards, the 2-week old white buttons I used last night, which, by the way, were still absolutely perfect, would've had to be tossed because they were past your "5 days only" rule. You simply can't make generalized statements like that - they don't fit everyone.
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Old 08-26-2009, 01:39 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BH51 View Post
The brown paper bag is the way to go........I picked some wild porcini
several weeks ago,....sliced them 1/2" thick and dehydrated them till
they were almost completed dryed,...kept them in a paper bag in a
cool dry place, pulled some out yesterday, soaked them about 10 min.
in cold water and they sauteed just as tho I'd just picked them...they
were excellent........I dunno if other types can be done the same way..
I've frozen (grifola florosa) Hen of the woods, indefinately, w/ similar
results........................................... ..........................................BH51

are hen of the woods, sheeps head, and oyster mushrooms the same mushroom?
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Old 08-26-2009, 01:41 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnerd View Post
if I really have a lot of them I will 'can' them.
How do you can them? Just curious as to your methode.
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Old 08-26-2009, 02:58 PM   #17
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Julia's Way With Mushies

Hey Kids:

See Page 515 of Mastering the Art of...(by Child). I have always used this method of utilizing mushrooms that look less than perfect, but not rotten or moldy. Saute up this mix and store it in the freezer (I use my food saver machine and freeze it in small plastic pouches). This mix has many uses.

Duxelles

1/2 lb. finely minced fresh mushrooms, whole your with the stems (you choose, about 2 cups).
An 8" enameled skillet
2 Tablespoons butter
2 Tablespoons Shallots, or Green onions, minced
1 Tablespoons oil
Optional: 1/4 cup of Maderia wine and 1/4 cup brown stock or canned beef boullion.

Squeeze the mushrooms dry thereby extracting as much juice/water from them as possible. If you are frugal, you can save the liquid for soups, etc. In the skillet, saute the mushies, shallots or onions in the butter and oil over moderately high heat. After 6-8 minutes the mushroom pieces should begin to separate, (after the squeezing) and begin to caramelize slightly.

Season to taste with salt and pepper. Add the optional wine and stock, and boil down rapidly until liquid has reduced to nothing.

(*)If not used immediately, allow to cool. Pack into a covered jar or other container, store in the fridge, or freeze.

Nice for all sorts of stuffings, soups, sauces, you name it.

Enjoy!
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Old 08-26-2009, 06:10 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdaddy3k View Post
are hen of the woods, sheeps head, and oyster mushrooms the same mushroom?
"Hen of the Woods" & "Sheepshead" mushrooms are the same. Commercially they're also known as "Maitake" mushrooms. "Oyster" mushrooms are completely different, & just to add more confusion to the pot, there's a mushroom variety known as "Chicken of the Woods" that's also completely different from all of the above.
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