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Old 09-06-2011, 10:13 PM   #21
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With due respect to American perceptions, sushi is predominantly about the rice.

In Japan, being a sushi apprentice means spending 8-10 years learning to prepare the rice properly. The topping, whether Chirashi, Nigiri, Maki, Inari, et al, is secondary to that. It's all about the rice.

That's the biggest reason why fast-food or grocery store sushi is so inferior to a high quality Japanese restaurant.
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Old 09-06-2011, 10:49 PM   #22
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Before we get off-track into cultural philosophies and such, lets instead remain on-course and discuss the "How To" of making your own sushi.

All parts of the traditions of sushi can be respected by those who wish and the freedom to explore the zillions of ways of making Modern Sushi can coincide with the old traditions by merely allowing both to exist without argument between them.

While accepting that sushi tradition defines "sushi" as "seasoned rice", in the more modern sense, sushi is now defined as many, many things, including both the manner of its creation and the items which are now used to create it.

It's a true 180 degree clash of the old and new. I once saw something that would make most traditional sushi people cringe; jello combined with a sushi-like appearance using dessert items to represent traditional sushi ingredients. The dish was a real hit with the kids it was for, whose parents were Modern Sushi lovers.

The details and traditional methods used to create what we know as "sushi" today are still respected when appropriate, and at the places that are appropriate. It would indeed be a rude person who would barge into a nice sushi establishment and try to order a hot-dog with relish and onions.

Equally, I don't believe that it would be fair to hold everyone to a traditional form of sushi in a forum that is open to a wide range of modern cooking and food preparation.

Let's try to keep on track with "Making your own sushi" and the thousands of ways to make that happen.

Thanks everyone!
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Old 09-07-2011, 02:08 AM   #23
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Let's try it!
Now, I've never prepared sushi before, I live in the biggest rice producing area of Europe, Pavia province, so I have no issue about rice.
It lloks like I need that oshibako box and a good knife. That's ok.
Now, what's the first recipe I could try?

Thanks
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Old 09-07-2011, 09:54 AM   #24
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Let's try it!
Now, I've never prepared sushi before, I live in the biggest rice producing area of Europe, Pavia province, so I have no issue about rice.
It lloks like I need that oshibako box and a good knife. That's ok.
Now, what's the first recipe I could try?

Thanks
Ok! Here is a way to make a type of sushi that is as easy as it gets!

It's called "Temari" sushi, or Temarizushi.

You simply make your seasoned sushi rice, place a piece of stretchy wrap on the counter, table or even on a plate. Then you put whatever you wish to be the "top" of the Temari Ball onto the plastic wrap and top it with a small amount of rice.

Then, gather the plastic wrap around the food and twist it into a ball!

When you unwrap the plastic wrap, you'll have a perfect little ball of rice that is topped with your choice of food!

The food can be anything that will form to the rice ball. Even diced veggies work for this! Perhaps a thick puree of colorful veggies!

You can even make it multiple layers by adding another layer of food in a complimentary color and taste, like avocado topped with smoked salmon.

The ideas are endless. That's one of the best parts of sushi. If you hate rice, then thick mashed potatoes or mashed sweet potato can be used instead. Even a bread cube could be used to do this!

If packing it into a bento or box-lunch, just leave the plastic wrap on the Temari ball and use items that keep well without refrigeration.

Here's a beautiful page showing some of the items that can be made into Temarizushi!

Enjoy!
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Old 09-07-2011, 10:13 AM   #25
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Hi Claire,

When I read your posts, I always think of my Grammy. Her name was also Claire, and she was the nicest person I've ever known in my entire life.

You sound as nice as she did!

When I looked up "A person who loves all things Japanese", I found:

Nippoanglophilus
Nippoanglophille
Anglonippophilus
Anglonippophile

A young Japanese women supplied those answers and said that each of them would work.

Do you recognise the one you're familiar with?

I always put a very light coat of vegetable oil on my sushi knives before storing it in a white cotton cloth. They seem to like it.
How funny, my best friend's mom was one of a very few women I knew named Claire, and her little brother was Timothy.

that said, I have a Vietnamese/American neighbor who we exchange stuff with and he brought me a package of nori of some sort. I really don't know what it is (the brand name is Dongwon, so assume it is Korean). But I think it is in little squares. The next time I see good tuna I'll let you all know what I do with the stuff.

Oh, I think I'll stick to saying, "a friend who likes all things Japanese!" Heck, I'm still confused as to why Franco-American was canned spaghetti, when, in fact, I and many of my friends over the years are Franco-American, and that has nothing to do with Italian food!
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Old 09-07-2011, 10:34 AM   #26
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...
You simply make your seasoned sushi rice,
...
SIMPLY???

Poor me, now I need japanese rice, rice vinegar, a rice cooker (don't know what it is), a sushi-oke, a shamoj...

Ok, I'm not giving up, but I think I'll try to prepare a sort of Pavese sushi using local food: the world famous Pavizushi!
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:35 AM   #27
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SIMPLY???

Poor me, now I need japanese rice, rice vinegar, a rice cooker (don't know what it is), a sushi-oke, a shamoj...

Ok, I'm not giving up, but I think I'll try to prepare a sort of Pavese sushi using local food: the world famous Pavizushi!
Any short grain rice will work. Any wooden bowl will work. any method of gently turning the rice will work.

No special tools are necessary. Rice vinegar is in any Asian food store. You can cook the rice in any way you want to as long as it's not over-done to the point of mush.

Yes, very, very simple. Please don't give up.
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:42 AM   #28
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I use Cal-Rose rice, simply because it was the most commonly used rice for just about all Asian food when I lived in Hawaii (except for the Jasmine for Thai and Basmati for Indian), but most of the people I knew were of Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Filipino background, and they bought Cal-Rose by the 40 or 50 lb bags, which you could get anywhere. They all had huge rice cookers and filled them every morning before going to work. I use it for most applications ... When I first moved here I couldn't get rice to make risotto with and it worked just fine.
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Old 09-07-2011, 12:22 PM   #29
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I use Cal-Rose rice, simply because it was the most commonly used rice for just about all Asian food when I lived in Hawaii (except for the Jasmine for Thai and Basmati for Indian), but most of the people I knew were of Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Filipino background, and they bought Cal-Rose by the 40 or 50 lb bags, which you could get anywhere. They all had huge rice cookers and filled them every morning before going to work. I use it for most applications ... When I first moved here I couldn't get rice to make risotto with and it worked just fine.
Thanks Claire!

Years ago, when I made my very first sushi rice, I worried it to death before ever starting. "I'll mess it up....it'll be too sticky....it'll be not-sticky-enough....it'll be mush....it'll be too dry....it'll be too tart....it'll be too sweet", all of these thoughts went through my head.

It turned out perfectly and my very first homemade sushi was great!

Rice is very inexpensive. Try making your first sushi rice with only one-half cup of dry rice first. If it's no good, note what is wrong, throw it out and try again! After only a few tries, you'll have a perfect method down-pat and will never be intimidated by rice again!
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Old 09-07-2011, 05:50 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Luca Lazzari View Post
SIMPLY???

Poor me, now I need japanese rice, rice vinegar, a rice cooker (don't know what it is), a sushi-oke, a shamoj...

Ok, I'm not giving up, but I think I'll try to prepare a sort of Pavese sushi using local food: the world famous Pavizushi!
Lucca, I use a wide, shallow ceramic bowl to cool my rice with a wooden spoon/paddle. Works very well...even a lasagna pan would work to cool and season your rice. You don't need the fancy things to get good sushi.
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Old 09-07-2011, 06:16 PM   #31
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Lucca, I use a wide, shallow ceramic bowl to cool my rice with a wooden spoon/paddle. Works very well...even a lasagna pan would work to cool and season your rice. You don't need the fancy things to get good sushi.

Right on! I use a 13x9 glass baking dish, a cheap bamboo paddle to toss it and a folding paper fan to cool it.
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Old 09-07-2011, 06:24 PM   #32
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Right on! I use a 13x9 glass baking dish, a cheap bamboo paddle to toss it and a folding paper fan to cool it.
I use a plastic spatula in a large stainless steel bowl with a 4" electric "clip-on" fan pointing at the bowl while I toss the rice.

It's called; "Whatever works".

The little clip on fan was an idea I got when I saw the fan at the store. It works really good.
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Old 09-07-2011, 06:34 PM   #33
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Ok, I'm not giving up, but I think I'll try to prepare a sort of Pavese sushi using local food: the world famous Pavizushi!
I look forward to your creation, Luca!

You don't even really have to season the rice base, if your combination suggests it'd be better that way. True sushi = vinegar rice, as qmax noted, but as long as its starch component can somehow hold its shape as finger-food, I get a kick out of new sushi inventions.

By the way, was it you who posted recent pics of a new set of cookie molds? Sorry if I'm mistaken. If so, I think they might improvise well as "oshibako"...
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Old 09-07-2011, 06:46 PM   #34
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I use a plastic spatula in a large stainless steel bowl with a 4" electric "clip-on" fan pointing at the bowl while I toss the rice.

It's called; "Whatever works".

The little clip on fan was an idea I got when I saw the fan at the store. It works really good.
That's a great idea. I think I'll ditch the sushi chef apprentice I've kept for the past seven years doing nothing but waving a giant paper fan while I scowl, "evaporation too fast, rice drying," and draw "cryptic magical glyphs" in the rice with my spatula...
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Old 09-07-2011, 09:57 PM   #35
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Before we get off-track into cultural philosophies and such, lets instead remain on-course and discuss the "How To" of making your own sushi.

All parts of the traditions of sushi can be respected by those who wish and the freedom to explore the zillions of ways of making Modern Sushi can coincide with the old traditions by merely allowing both to exist without argument between them.

While accepting that sushi tradition defines "sushi" as "seasoned rice", in the more modern sense, sushi is now defined as many, many things, including both the manner of its creation and the items which are now used to create it.

It's a true 180 degree clash of the old and new. I once saw something that would make most traditional sushi people cringe; jello combined with a sushi-like appearance using dessert items to represent traditional sushi ingredients. The dish was a real hit with the kids it was for, whose parents were Modern Sushi lovers.

The details and traditional methods used to create what we know as "sushi" today are still respected when appropriate, and at the places that are appropriate. It would indeed be a rude person who would barge into a nice sushi establishment and try to order a hot-dog with relish and onions.

Equally, I don't believe that it would be fair to hold everyone to a traditional form of sushi in a forum that is open to a wide range of modern cooking and food preparation.

Let's try to keep on track with "Making your own sushi" and the thousands of ways to make that happen.

Thanks everyone!
While I get that there are a million ways to make sushi, the rice is not a "cultural philosophy", It is essential to sushi and certainly not off track.

It's like cooking pasta al dente, or incorporating a liquid properly in a risotto.

It make or breaks the dish. It is fundamental.

It doesn't matter what you put on it or how you slice it. Crappy rice yields crappy sushi.

We can agree to disagree if you choose.
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Old 09-07-2011, 10:59 PM   #36
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While I get that there are a million ways to make sushi, the rice is not a "cultural philosophy", It is essential to sushi and certainly not off track.

It's like cooking pasta al dente, or incorporating a liquid properly in a risotto.

It make or breaks the dish. It is fundamental.

It doesn't matter what you put on it or how you slice it. Crappy rice yields crappy sushi.

We can agree to disagree if you choose.
Hey! No problem here! The rice is part of the whole. If any of the parts are seriously screwed up, it ruins the outcome.

It would be silly to argue over sushi rice. I'm good with anyone's methods. This thread is all about sharing them.

The only argument I would have is if someone were to say thier way is the only way to do something with sushi. Some traditionalists are that way.

Peace qmax. No disagreements here. Didn't mean for my comments to be interpreted as an attack or anything. In fact, I would appreciate it if you would share some of you knowledge and methods here in this thread.

I'll be quiet now and let others show their skills.
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:11 PM   #37
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hey, don't be quiet now. this is a good thread, and i have a question.

how is the fish used for the most commonly known form of sushi determined to be sushi grade? who grades it, and how? there must be fresh sushi fish, or are all sushi grade fishes deep frozen to make sure it's free from parasites?
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Old 09-08-2011, 08:57 AM   #38
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I look forward to your creation, Luca!

You don't even really have to season the rice base, if your combination suggests it'd be better that way. True sushi = vinegar rice, as qmax noted, but as long as its starch component can somehow hold its shape as finger-food, I get a kick out of new sushi inventions.

By the way, was it you who posted recent pics of a new set of cookie molds? Sorry if I'm mistaken. If so, I think they might improvise well as "oshibako"...
Yes, it was me! Well, I will use those molds, pavese italian rice, italian white wine vinegar, local vegetables, some octopus, some other fish, and all the plain tools suggested by all of you.
Now, I need some human guinea-pig, maybe my old friend Stefano, he could eat stones, if needed...
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Old 09-08-2011, 10:03 AM   #39
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hey, don't be quiet now. this is a good thread, and i have a question.

how is the fish used for the most commonly known form of sushi determined to be sushi grade? who grades it, and how? there must be fresh sushi fish, or are all sushi grade fishes deep frozen to make sure it's free from parasites?
I'll try to be as clear as possible. This is a "How-to-make-your-own-sushi-at-home" thread.

It's not a discussion about the legalities of sushi and what laws, rules, regulations and guidelines of those departments, branches, legal bodies or enforcement agencies that are in place throughout the world.

If you want to know all the legal stuff, it's out there on the Internet. Anyone who is in need of finding that information is just as capable of finding it as I am. I'm not being drawn into a legal argument about sushi.

Sorry.

In fact, the 2009 legal documents needed for a business in Seatle Washington, USA are outlined within this letter to a fish company there:

----
Cannon Fish Company 1/26/09

Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Service
Food and Drug Administration
Seattle District
Pacific Region
22201 23rd Drive SE
Bothell, WA 98021-4421
Telephone: 425-486-8788
FAX: 425-483-4996




January 26, 2009

VIA CERTIFIED MAIL
RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED
In reply refer to Warning Letter SEA 09-09
Peter A. Cannon, President
Cannon Fish Company
215 West Harrison Street, Suite 200
Seattle, Washington 98119

WARNING LETTER

Dear Mr. Cannon:
We inspected your seafood importer establishment, located at 215 West Harrison Street,Suite 200, Seattle, Washington, on August 12 and 13, 2008. We found that you have serious violations of the seafood Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) regulation, Title 21, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 123 (21 CFR Part 123). The specific requirements for imported fish and fishery products are set out in 21 CFR 123.12. As an importer of fish or fishery products, you must operate in accordance with the requirements of Part 123. In accordance with 21 CFR 123.12(d), there must be evidence that all fish and fishery products offered for entry into the United States have been processed under conditions that comply with 21 CFR Part 123. If assurances do not exist that the imported fish or fishery product has been processed under conditions that are equivalent to those required of domestic processors under 21 CFR Part 123, the fish or fishery products will appear to be adulterated under Section 402(a)(4) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act), 21 U.S.C. § 342(a)(4) and will be denied entry. Because our inspection identified serious violations of 21 CFR Part 123, your imported frozen, raw, sashimi grade swordfish fillets are adulterated under Section402(a)(4) of the Act (21 U.S.C. § 342(a)(4)), in that they have been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby they may have been rendered injurious to health. You may find the Act, the seafood HACCP regulation, and the Fish and Fisheries Products Hazards & Controls Guidance through links in FDA's home page at www.fda.gov.1
Your significant violations were as follows:
You must implement an affirmative step designed to ensure that the fish and fishery products that you import into the United States were processed in accordance with the requirements of FDA's seafood HACCP regulations, to comply with 123.12(a)(2)(ii). However, your firm did not implement an affirmative step for the importation of frozen, raw, sashimi grade swordfish fillets from (b)(4).
We may take further action if you do not promptly correct these violations. For instance, we may take further action to refuse admission of your imported fish or fishery products under Section 801(a) of the Act (21 U.S.C. § 381(a)), including placing them on detention without physical examination; seize your product(s);and/or enjoin your firm from further violating the Act.
We acknowledge your letter of November 20, 2008, advising FDA that your verification plans for imported products have been completed. We also acknowledge your earlier letter of August 15, 2008, advising FDA that you had at that time begun work on verification plans for imported products with the assistance of a consultant. Neither letter, however, included documentation demonstrating that you have implemented an affirmative step or otherwise corrected the aforementioned violation. You should respond in writing within fifteen (15) working days from your. receipt of this letter. Your response should outline the specific things you are doing to correct these violations. You should include in your response documentation, such as HACCP and importer verification records and records that document the performance and results of your firm's affirmative steps, or other useful information that would assist us in evaluating your corrections. If you cannot complete all corrections before you respond, you should explain the reason for your delay and state when you will correct any remaining violations.
This letter may not list all the violations at your facility. You are responsible for ensuring that your seafood importer establishment operates in compliance with the Act and the seafood HACCP regulation (21 CFR Part 123). You also have a responsibility to use procedures to prevent further violations of the Act and all applicable regulations for the fish or fishery products that you import into the United States.
Please send your written reply to the Food and Drug Administration, Attention: Michael J. Donovan, Compliance Officer, 22201 23rd Drive SE, Bothell, WA 98021-4421. If you have any questions regarding this letter, please contact Mr. Donovan at (425) 483-4906

Sincerely,

/S/

Charles M. Breen
District Director
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Old 09-08-2011, 10:16 AM   #40
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Thanks for this thread Timothy, it has inspired me.
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