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Old 02-18-2012, 09:03 PM   #11
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Well, if you're going to grow indoors, you can start as soon as the sets are available. And that depends on where you are. Here in Central Texas, the stores just put out the herb and vegetable sets.

I can but fresh in the grocery, just about all the common herbs. The whole hydroponically grown plant in a plastic sleeve with some water in the bottom. The taste is okay. (Maybe not as strong, because their lives are too easy.) But they're kind of expensive, $2.50 to $3.00. I can by a nursery set for $1.50 or less and grow it into four or five times the plant they're selling in the produce section in short order. And I don't waste any excess.
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Old 02-18-2012, 09:24 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Where do you live? What is your climate like?

Would you be able to have a window box?
I live in Connecticut. It may be a little early to try to plant anything. I could probably move things outside during the summer, but if they are survive the winter they will be indoor plants for sure :)
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Old 02-18-2012, 09:25 PM   #13
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We have an herb garden out front, however her vegetable garden is elsewhere. You may want to look to see if your town has a city garden program. Ours does and she has a 10x15 garden nearby on city property. It is fenced and locked and they provide water.

This might be a solution for you as well.
Thanks for this suggestion. It will be something to look in to as well :)
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Old 02-18-2012, 09:27 PM   #14
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Well, if you're going to grow indoors, you can start as soon as the sets are available. And that depends on where you are. Here in Central Texas, the stores just put out the herb and vegetable sets.

I can but fresh in the grocery, just about all the common herbs. The whole hydroponically grown plant in a plastic sleeve with some water in the bottom. The taste is okay. (Maybe not as strong, because their lives are too easy.) But they're kind of expensive, $2.50 to $3.00. I can by a nursery set for $1.50 or less and grow it into four or five times the plant they're selling in the produce section in short order. And I don't waste any excess.
That is another consideration-how well they will taste. I want something that is just as strong if I am to put forth all this effort :)
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Old 02-18-2012, 09:38 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by MrsBlueEyzz

That is another consideration-how well they will taste. I want something that is just as strong if I am to put forth all this effort :)
If you are buying plants, smell them and taste a leaf or rub a leaf between your fingers and take a whiff. Just don't be too obvious.
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Old 02-18-2012, 09:43 PM   #16
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When growing indoors, the issue is light. If you have a bright window or patio door, that would do. Otherwise you'll have to use artifcial light.

The biggest error people make with herbs is overwatering them. That's one reason the grocery pots have such little flavor. You want the soil (which, btw, should not be rich; just the opposite) to actually dry out before adding moisture. And there is almost no need for fertilizer.

Keep in mind that most of the more common herbs we use are native to the hillsides around the Med; essentially arid conditions.

The better you treat them, the less happy they will be. And the milder the flavor. In other words, do not treat them like house plants, which appreciate babying.

If you have the room, a fun approach is to plant your herbs in strawberry pots. You can use both the large opening and all those little cups. Many people use them to create theme herb gardens, such as Italian or Asian.

By the way, you can start most herbacious herbs from clippings. If you ever use those expensive clamshell packs from the grocery, try starting some of them. Basically, take a sprig. Cut the bottom at a sharp angle. Remove all the leaves. Plant the stem, cut side down, in a pot of sand or planting soil. Keep it relatively moist until roots form and new leaves start to appear. Then transplant to their final home. Among those you can start this way are mint, oregano, marjoram, thyme, tarragon, rosemary, and sage. Basil will not work from cuttings, and should be started from seed. Parsley, too.
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Old 02-18-2012, 10:09 PM   #17
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You can also transplant your little potted plants into one big pot, a sort of container garden. Choose plants of different heights, drapey stuff like thyme, different colored basils, even some chives, etc. You can cram in as many or as few as you want, and it will be very attractive as well as useful. It can go outside in mild weather if you want, then brought in when it gets cold. Do you already grow some houseplants, MBE?
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Old 02-18-2012, 10:19 PM   #18
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The better you treat them, the less happy they will be. And the milder the flavor. In other words, do not treat them like house plants, which appreciate babying.
I did not know this, thank you for the information.
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Old 02-19-2012, 03:16 AM   #19
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You should also be aware that some plants are annuals and will last the summer, but won't be able to go much longer.

When you get your new plants home, Google each kind for plant care to get the info.
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Old 02-19-2012, 07:37 AM   #20
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If you are buying plants, smell them and taste a leaf or rub a leaf between your fingers and take a whiff. Just don't be too obvious.
That's a good idea :)
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