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Old 02-20-2008, 11:39 AM   #21
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I'm totally confused. I'm in North Carolina, Charlotte area, we're getting 50s on average already. I'm doing the peppers in big pots (no ground, no telling when I'll be evicted if I don't get a job soon). So I'll have the options to start them from small plants inside or out. When is my question. When do I start??
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Old 02-20-2008, 12:50 PM   #22
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Callisto - if you're going to start them from seed (as I do), you can start anytime you want now. I'll be starting mine (God willing - lol) in a couple of weeks, because I can rarely plant out peppers/tomatoes/eggplants until early May. Last year we were still having stray heavy frosts in late April. But where you're located, you should be just fine starting pepper seeds indoors now.
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Old 02-20-2008, 12:59 PM   #23
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the UK is Zone 8, but if you have a good greenhouse (mine is home-made) it Will work perfectly! :D

I`ve been growing them here for over 20 years without fail, I crop into december even!

as for Feeding Don`t feed them UNTIL they start to flower! then you want high potash feeds, Tomato feed is just fine (they are the same family).
I feed mine Gunpowder, Yes Seriously!

be sure to Water deeper in the soil, and feed from the Top (the root system is like that, takes the feed from the top roots often above the surface, but water from the lower/deeper roots).
Foliar feeding is good also, but only use VERY dilute soln and only last thing at night else it will burn/scorch the leaves.

it doesn`t hurt them to let the soil go a little Dry either, enough that the leaves droop a little, then just water them again.
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:10 AM   #24
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Callisto - if you're going to start them from seed (as I do), you can start anytime you want now. I'll be starting mine (God willing - lol) in a couple of weeks, because I can rarely plant out peppers/tomatoes/eggplants until early May. Last year we were still having stray heavy frosts in late April. But where you're located, you should be just fine starting pepper seeds indoors now.
I remember being snowed in in April over easter last year. Couldn't drive home from PA to NC.

I just got some money and I'm debating to buy seeds or wait until my second paycheck. Is April too late to start pepper seeds in North Carolina? Winter's still whacky up and down up and down.
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Old 03-13-2008, 09:20 AM   #25
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It's really a tossup. You want approx. 8 weeks from seed-sowing to planting out (including some hardening-off time). Starting in April (just a couple of weeks from now) would put you around early June for plant-out. Peppers/tomatoes/eggplants are true heat-lovers, so won't mind the wait. In fact, the stores are still full of commercially-grown plants at that time with plenty of buyers.

You could experiment & pick up just a couple of packs of seeds to start now, buy & sow the bulk of your order later, & compare the ultimate results down the road.
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Old 03-13-2008, 11:22 AM   #26
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Have I mentioned the peppers won't be transplanted to the ground? Does that make a difference. I know you can do them in pots, I have in the past. I just rent so I don't like to plant.

I'm wondering, too, if I can reuse older soil if I mix it with new. That would save me some money and the pots only had flowers in them before.
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Old 03-13-2008, 11:38 AM   #27
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Planting in pots won't make a difference. In fact, the soil in them will be even warmer, which will make your heat-lovers grow even faster. Even though I also have an in-the-ground garden, I always have a few pots of tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, okra, & herbs on the deck.

As for reusing soil, I always start with fresh potting mix, so can't offer any experienced advice there.
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:01 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
Have I mentioned the peppers won't be transplanted to the ground? Does that make a difference. I know you can do them in pots, I have in the past. I just rent so I don't like to plant.

I'm wondering, too, if I can reuse older soil if I mix it with new. That would save me some money and the pots only had flowers in them before.
Yes, you can - I do that all the time. I'd look for a potting mix that includes nutrients for veggies, or use Miracle Gro or something similar when you plant them. Here's some general info about veggie container gardening: Container Vegetable Gardening - HGIC @ Clemson University HTH.
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:14 PM   #29
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Yes, you can - I do that all the time. I'd look for a potting mix that includes nutrients for veggies, or use Miracle Gro or something similar when you plant them. Here's some general info about veggie container gardening: Container Vegetable Gardening - HGIC @ Clemson University HTH.
Thanks GotGarlic. I'm going to get some seeds. At less than a dollar a packet if I fail, I won't be too mad. :)
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Old 03-23-2008, 08:23 PM   #30
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I love annies. Great for all manor of salsa and soups.
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