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Old 02-16-2014, 07:48 AM   #21
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Are you guys talking about a brine that is 1/4 cup salt to a gallon of water or stronger?
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Old 02-16-2014, 10:10 AM   #22
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Are you guys talking about a brine that is 1/4 cup salt to a gallon of water or stronger?
Standard brine ratio is a cup of kosher salt to a gallon of water. Brine needs a certain level of salt to work, chemically.
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Old 02-16-2014, 11:44 AM   #23
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Standard brine ratio is a cup of kosher salt to a gallon of water. Brine needs a certain level of salt to work, chemically.
+1
For two thick pork chops I use 1/4 cup of Kosher salt to 4 cups of water. Be sure all of the meat is covered in the small bowl.
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Old 02-16-2014, 12:36 PM   #24
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I'm hoping for a comment from Craig. Do you add salt to the beer for brining?

Why is salt necessary? I've got high blood pressure, so I'm not anxious to brine. If it's for tenderizing, pineapple juice works very well, as does meat tenderizer, I presume.

I'm not really happy with the tenderness of my pork sirloin shoulder, even though I get it to almost melt, the whiter part of the pork is still not to my liking, tastewise.

Is there a better cut of pork to use that has more of the darker meat?

I'm trying to limit the amount of animal fat in the finished product that I eat, but need more flavor.
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Old 02-16-2014, 12:42 PM   #25
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I'm hoping for a comment from Craig. Do you add salt to the beer for brining?

Why is salt necessary?...
There has to be a higher concentration of salt in the brine than in the water in the meat cells. Then there is a back and forth exchange of salty water and meat juices in an attempt to equalize the saltiness in the brine and the cells. The saltier liquid in the cells works to slow the loss of moisture from the meat as it cooks so you end up with juicier meat. The salt level is higher after brining. I don't know how much or if it's enough to impact you HBP.
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:23 PM   #26
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Um, I think I get what you mean, Andy. I guess I'll have to just try it. Unfortunately, the Tyson roast I usually buy includes salt on the ingredients, that makes me think it's already brined, which is why it's so tender.

I guess I'm really looking for more flavor. That might be satisfied with more of the darker pork, but I'm unsure what cut to get.

I suppose I can figure out a way to cut down on the fat, either before or after cooking.

One of the most satisfying pork roasts I've cooked is natural, unsmoked ham. It's very fatty, but I could remove the fat after cooking....
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:31 PM   #27
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Um, I think I get what you mean, Andy. I guess I'll have to just try it. Unfortunately, the Tyson roast I usually buy includes salt on the ingredients, that makes me think it's already brined, which is why it's so tender.

I guess I'm really looking for more flavor. That might be satisfied with more of the darker pork, but I'm unsure what cut to get.

I suppose I can figure out a way to cut down on the fat, either before or after cooking.

One of the most satisfying pork roasts I've cooked is natural, unsmoked ham. It's very fatty, but I could remove the fat after cooking....
I stopped buying pork loins as they are too dry and I don't always have time to brine. I typically use pork tenderloins, sirloin, country-style ribs and Boston butt.
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:36 PM   #28
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Thanks, Andy. Dry, that's the word I was looking for. At first I liked the tenderness of the pork sirloin shoulder, but chopped up in my chop suey, even marinated, left something to be desired.

I'll just have to go back the the basic pork roasts, and find one to satisfy my craving for flavor. My chop suey needs it!
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:46 PM   #29
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You brine primary for juiciness, not tenderness
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:53 PM   #30
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Ah, thanks, Jenny!
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