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Old 02-06-2015, 05:16 PM   #21
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When in doubt get an oven with a big, red, conventional, single analog dial. There is no distinguishing between baking and roasting.
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Old 02-06-2015, 05:22 PM   #22
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So again not trying to be difficult but how is it that roasting and baking be the same? So if recipe says roast u think of no cover and a carmelized crunch on the outside. Why would you say roast and bake are the same? How do you determine which way to go.
Let me throw this question back at you. My oven has no setting that says ROAST. So you tell me.... how do I roast food in it?

Hint: the answer is very simple. I even gave it to you up above.
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Old 02-06-2015, 08:59 PM   #23
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I completely understand with the oven settings. That is not the issue. The issue is people here said earlier that roast and bake are the same,I agree on that when it comes to stove . But you can't say in a recipe that says roast they also mean bake. Like roasted potatoes and baked potatoes. That is two different things,right? Different out comes. So in a recipe like my ham one that says cover and roast for x amount of time.....that does not apply. ,so why do refer to roast here in the recipe? It's not the stove its why and when recipes say roast. Think of roast....think of a crunchy carmelized outside. But not in this case with the ham. A lot of recipes mention roast when comes to meat but it does not reflect the carmelized outside. So why say roast in oven. Maybe this is a little clearer on what I am trying to ask. Also say like oven fry you are using the bake cycle but you know the food is going to fried like when done .so why wouldn't when you say roast it would mean carmelized outside. Maybe I am not asking the right way....but I hope this helps on what I am trying to ask. Sorry so long just trying to get across what I mean.
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Old 02-06-2015, 10:44 PM   #24
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If we throw in a stove with with both convection and regular ovens into the mix this whole question will self destruct?
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Old 02-06-2015, 11:10 PM   #25
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Here is another approach..... Bake a cake at 350 degrees ,but say if its meat we say its roast chicken? Correct me if I am wrong, but is it because of the food cooking we say either roast and bake and roast doesn't mean the technique to cook it?
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Old 02-06-2015, 11:18 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mumu View Post
I completely understand with the oven settings. That is not the issue. The issue is people here said earlier that roast and bake are the same,I agree on that when it comes to stove . But you can't say in a recipe that says roast they also mean bake. Like roasted potatoes and baked potatoes. That is two different things,right? Different out comes. So in a recipe like my ham one that says cover and roast for x amount of time.....that does not apply. ,so why do refer to roast here in the recipe? It's not the stove its why and when recipes say roast. Think of roast....think of a crunchy carmelized outside. But not in this case with the ham. A lot of recipes mention roast when comes to meat but it does not reflect the carmelized outside. So why say roast in oven. Maybe this is a little clearer on what I am trying to ask. Also say like oven fry you are using the bake cycle but you know the food is going to fried like when done .so why wouldn't when you say roast it would mean carmelized outside. Maybe I am not asking the right way....but I hope this helps on what I am trying to ask. Sorry so long just trying to get across what I mean.
I think that you are reading too much into this. I'm sorry but unless you are making cakes and pastries, roasting and baking ARE the same thing. The terms may be used to specify different foods, but the process is identical.

Take "baked" macaroni and cheese. I want it a bit golden and crispy on top, but I wouldn't call it roasted. It just sounds funny. The same with gratin potatoes.

But I can make "roasted" vegetables and I don't want a crisp crust on them. Maybe a slight bit caramelized for some veggies, but not crispy or crunchy. Yet I would never call them baked.

A baked potato is essentially roasted, but we still call them baked potatoes. Or in some places it's a jacket potato, which eliminates any confusion.

In other words, it's more the usual problem with the English language, that the words are mostly used interchangeably with various dishes, and they really have little to do with the cooking process.
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Old 02-07-2015, 09:04 AM   #27
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You are asking us to read the mind of the recipe writer, who we don't know, and judge their intent while writing a recipe. Plain and simple, it just doesn't matter. Semantics and cooking are two vastly different subjects. You take each and every word/description/direction too literally and lose the meaning of what is needed.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:13 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mumu View Post
Here is another approach..... Bake a cake at 350 degrees ,but say if its meat we say its roast chicken? Correct me if I am wrong, but is it because of the food cooking we say either roast and bake and roast doesn't mean the technique to cook it?
,
We are trying to correct you, but you are not listening to or believing us.

I get the impression you are not a native English speaker, so that may be where part of the confusion lies. English is a hybrid language which originated from more than one language. Many of our words came from Anglo-Saxon, which is a Germanic language. When France occupied England hundreds of years ago, the English language also assimilated many French words.

So we have many terms for which there are words having the same, or nearly the same, meaning, but a different origin.

Roast comes from the Old French word "rostir," which means "to cook by dry heat." Online Etymology Dictionary

Bake comes from the German word "backen," which means "to cook by dry heat in an oven or on heated metal or stones."
Bake | Define Bake at Dictionary.com

For the most part, these words are interchangeable.

This happens a lot in English. That's why we have words like "dine" (French origin) and "eat" (German origin) which mean the same thing. In many cases, the French origin word is just a fancier way of saying it.

So please stop being so literal.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:28 AM   #29
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Then why does my oven have separate bake and roast modes with identical temp preset choices for each? I've always wondered about that... and I've lost sleep over this.
My convection oven has roast feature that cycles the broiler element on and off and uses the fans to circulate. It does a really nice job crisping skin on poultry and creates a very even color all over that high heat roasting on a regular setting doesn't quite match.

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Old 02-07-2015, 11:18 AM   #30
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Thanks for all the advice. As far as being literal,just trying to understand. ( sorry).I would like to say that when I see the word roasting I think of crunchy crust etc... You guys know what I am saying and baking I think of merly just browning things. Maybe I am wrong , so with that said that is why I am having a hard time when a recipe says like ham for example,cover and roast in oven. When I see roast I think of the above I just explained. Same problem when I see or hear people say I roasted chicken in a crock pot ..... How is that possible. Crock pot only braise. So WHY do they say ROASTED when clearly it's not. I don't think this is being literal to ask this question. Any one know why they say chicken in the crock pot is roasting?
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