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Old 10-04-2004, 08:10 PM   #1
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Tomato paste

does anyone here know how to make tomato paste or sauce from scratch with fresh tomatoes?

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Old 10-05-2004, 11:59 AM   #2
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Yes, I do, but I'm afraid if I post it you'll just say it's 'crap'
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Old 10-05-2004, 12:38 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalady
Yes, I do, but I'm afraid if I post it you'll just say it's 'crap'
I said that jar sauce (such as Ragu or Prego) is crap. I've had those sauces before, so I know what they taste like. I won't know if your recipe is crap unless I try it first.
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Old 10-05-2004, 12:42 PM   #4
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hey chainsaw,

what about those sauces do you think is crappy? there's lots of different types of tomato sauces; sweet, savory, spicy, flavored by meat or fish, ones with veggies and just plain. which type do you like, and which do you not like?
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Old 10-06-2004, 10:08 AM   #5
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Hi Marmalady, I remember my mother used to make a thick tomato sauce from scratch. This was back in India where canned products were not something that anyone ever used. Everything was made fresh and the long way. Here it goes:

Plum Tomatoes (about 30 or so depending on the size, you can adjust the amount to the quantity you have)
seasonings of your choice

She used to cut the tomatoes into large chunks and place it in a large saucepan. She would cover and cook them on medium heat until they were tender and the skin seperated out of the tomatoes (about 30 minutes or so).

Next let the tomato mixture cool down a tiny bit. Now seive the tomatoes through a food mill (she used a fine mesh for this, she had all different sizes of meshes). Thrown away the seeds and the skin and pour the reserved pulp in a clean saucepan. Add spices of your choices and continue to cook it until the desired thickness.

Note: There were no preservatives used and whatever she made was used within the week if not sooner.
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Old 10-06-2004, 10:09 AM   #6
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Sorry chainsaw I thought marmalady asked this question, the recipe I posted above it for you :-)
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Old 10-06-2004, 09:33 PM   #7
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The recipe Yakuta wrote is perfect for plum tomatoes, milling them after cooking, but just to let you know there are plum PASTE TOMATOES because I buy a bushel every year in August. They are a very thick, fleshy large plum tomato, not good or juicy for a salad, just for paste.
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Old 10-08-2004, 01:00 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakuta
Hi Marmalady, I remember my mother used to make a thick tomato sauce from scratch. This was back in India where canned products were not something that anyone ever used. Everything was made fresh and the long way. Here it goes:

Plum Tomatoes (about 30 or so depending on the size, you can adjust the amount to the quantity you have)
seasonings of your choice

She used to cut the tomatoes into large chunks and place it in a large saucepan. She would cover and cook them on medium heat until they were tender and the skin seperated out of the tomatoes (about 30 minutes or so).

Next let the tomato mixture cool down a tiny bit. Now seive the tomatoes through a food mill (she used a fine mesh for this, she had all different sizes of meshes). Thrown away the seeds and the skin and pour the reserved pulp in a clean saucepan. Add spices of your choices and continue to cook it until the desired thickness.

Note: There were no preservatives used and whatever she made was used within the week if not sooner.
thank you Yakuta, but now I just have one question:
do I cook the tomatoes in boiling water?
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Old 10-08-2004, 05:06 PM   #9
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Hi Chainsaw,

Well tomatoes have a lot of liquid so adding water may not be necessary. Just cut them into large chunks. Add the chunks and liquid that comes out when your cutting them into a saucepan. Place it on the stove, cover and let it cook/steam on medium for about 30 minutes. Adding water is going to dillute the tomatoes and the entire purpose here is to concentrate them.
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Old 10-19-2004, 11:22 AM   #10
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My father, age 81, continues to be an active & accomplished flower & vegetable gardener. I phoned him this morning and one of the questions I asked was about growing tomatoes for paste. He said that of the 9 varieties of tomatoes he’s harvesting this year, the plum-shaped Romas would be the best to choose for that purpose. But, he noted that the San Marzano type is even better because it has a deep flavor and a smooth, creamy texture like mashed potatoes. It requires much less boiling to get good paste because, when fully ripe, the fruits are practically juiceless.
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