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Old 09-30-2013, 12:31 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
Went shopping yesterday and the market had gotten in a shipment of 5 pound logs of Amish butter for $6. Very creamy and rich tasting. What to make, what to make?
Spread thickly on slabs of fresh homemade bread. On hot toast.

Just idle curiosity - how is Amish butter different to anyone else's butter? (I know who the Amish are.)
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:41 PM   #12
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Salt was originally added to butter to give it a longer shelf life.
A friend once told me that they only used unsalted butter at home. This was because they had noticed that salted butter didn't go off as fast, so he knew there were preservatives in the salted butter. Well, yeah, it's called salt.
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:54 PM   #13
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Of course freeze it. It will stay fresh and good in freezer for a long time.
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Old 09-30-2013, 01:01 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Spread thickly on slabs of fresh homemade bread. On hot toast.

Just idle curiosity - how is Amish butter different to anyone else's butter? (I know who the Amish are.)
It was made from mistreated farm animals and churned by children not allowed to speak.


Over here there is *something* about having the Amish name attached to things. I haven't quite figured it out myself, but when I see two brands of blue cheese in the counter and one says "Amish" on it, it's the one that goes in my cart
Pennsylvania Dutch is another one. I doubt those egg noodles I like have any real attachment to the PA Dutch, but I like 'em!
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Old 09-30-2013, 04:59 PM   #15
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Amish folk are known to be hard working simple living upright people. Amish cooking is hardy and delishious. So anything associated with the Amish is generally considered to be of high quality.
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Old 09-30-2013, 07:08 PM   #16
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Is it salted or unsalted butter?


Did you know that unsalted butter lasts longer in the freezer than salted butter. I think it's because salt lowers the freezing point

Sorry but that doesn't make sense to me.

Both salted and unsalted butter freezes within hours in a modern freezer.

Salt doesn't inhibit the protective effect of being frozen.
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Old 09-30-2013, 07:12 PM   #17
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It was made from mistreated farm animals and churned by children not allowed to speak.


Over here there is *something* about having the Amish name attached to things. I haven't quite figured it out myself, but when I see two brands of blue cheese in the counter and one says "Amish" on it, it's the one that goes in my cart
Pennsylvania Dutch is another one. I doubt those egg noodles I like have any real attachment to the PA Dutch, but I like 'em!
Maytag Blue one of my favorites comes from the heart of Amish Iowa but I don't think the maker is Amish.
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Old 09-30-2013, 10:20 PM   #18
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Sorry but that doesn't make sense to me.

Both salted and unsalted butter freezes within hours in a modern freezer.

Salt doesn't inhibit the protective effect of being frozen.
Are you sure? I got the info from Joy of Cooking.

I'll ask my sister. She's a chemical engineer who specialized in food.
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Old 10-01-2013, 02:03 AM   #19
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Spread thickly on slabs of fresh homemade bread. On hot toast.

Just idle curiosity - how is Amish butter different to anyone else's butter? (I know who the Amish are.)
The Amish do not treat their cows with hormones. And they are fed mostly grass, not chemically treated hay. So it makes their butter purer in the real sense. They do adhere to the laws of their State as to what the cows must be tested for before it can be sold to the public. Such as TB. And the milk or cream must be pasteurized also. But it is not ultra pasteurized. Ultra pasteurized is when it is pasteurized twice. I have no idea why, but it certainly kills the flavor of the product. Restaurants here do not use the ultra products. And you can really taste the difference.
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Old 10-01-2013, 08:23 AM   #20
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Are you sure? I got the info from Joy of Cooking.

I'll ask my sister. She's a chemical engineer who specialized in food.
No. I'm not sure. It just doesn't make any sense logically to me.

Once butter is frozen, it's preserved. Done.

Both salted and unsalted butter freeze quite quickly in a modern freezer.

I can't imagine that unsalted keeps better in the freezer.

In the fridge or on the counter the salt matters more.

I wouldn't trust JoC for food science, so lets hope your sister can weigh in. If I have time later ill do some research
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