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Old 03-14-2009, 12:46 PM   #71
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Originally Posted by PattY1 View Post
I just came home from the grocery store. Here some of the prices I found.

Corned Beef Point Cut- 1.69 lb- I bought this one
Corned Beef Flat Cut - 2.69 lb
Filet Mignon 15.99 lb
Chuck Roast 1.99 lb--Great Sale!!!!! I should go back and get more.
Tri-Tip is hard to find on the east coast, but when I can it is uasually around 4.99 lb
Porter House/Tbone 4.99 lb-Sale
Boneless Chicken Breast 1.99 lb-Sale
Ground Beef 73% lean 3.19 lb
As for the rest I did not look at them tonight
I noticed that the corned beef brisket at Von's, the place that had fresh brisket for $4.49, was only $2.69 a pound. Special for St. Patrick's Day, I suppose. Odd since you'd think it should cost more due to the extra steps it takes to corn the beef.

Anyway, comparing corned beef brisket to fresh brisket is like comparing ham to roast pork -- very different things.

Also, I understand that corned beef, brisket or otherwise, is almost unheard of in Ireland. It apparently became associated with the Irish in the U.S. during the late-19th and early-20th centuries because it was cheap and thus popular with the Irish immigrants, who generally were very poor.
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Old 03-14-2009, 12:56 PM   #72
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Quote:
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I noticed that the corned beef brisket at Von's, the place that had fresh brisket for $4.49, was only $2.69 a pound. Special for St. Patrick's Day, I suppose. Odd since you'd think it should cost more due to the extra steps it takes to corn the beef.

Anyway, comparing corned beef brisket to fresh brisket is like comparing ham to roast pork -- very different things.

Also, I understand that corned beef, brisket or otherwise, is almost unheard of in Ireland. It apparently became associated with the Irish in the U.S. during the late-19th and early-20th centuries because it was cheap and thus popular with the Irish immigrants, who generally were very poor.
Oh my goodness, yes: if you have to put a raw brisket in brine to "corn" it, so much more work. About a week or so of waiting. So buy your brisket already corned if possible.

My mother was all Irish. She made a lovely one pot meal of brisket, cabbage, onions, potatoes (red), carrots, peppercorns, cloves etc.. It was a family tradition, but I believe you are right that it was learned here in America. My mom always served it with green colcannon, biscuits and gravy. She prided herself in her soda bread, too. It was really sour and chewy.

A few pineapple upside down cakes were the desert, a la mode, of course.
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Old 03-14-2009, 05:09 PM   #73
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Finally it's here..yeah.... 11.10lb bouncin brisket..We paid $2.79 a lb..$30.97 total for the whole brisket..Not bad at all..

With so many cooking options you guys have provided makes it a tough decision.
You guys haven't made it easy.It all looks and sounds like it's the next best thing since sliced bread

I'll let you know what everyone decides on.Thanks for all the help.It's been greatly appreciated :)


Munky.
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Old 03-14-2009, 06:23 PM   #74
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That is one big brisket! Hope you are planning a feed for a lot of people. You could cut that sucker in half and share with another whole family.
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Old 03-14-2009, 10:47 PM   #75
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Good for you Munky!

Prices vary so much from area to area - but $2.69/lb isn't that bad.

Let's start another controversy: don't trim the fat and cook it fat side up!

There's another way to cook it????
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Old 03-15-2009, 03:35 AM   #76
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my poor brisket recipe is buried under a ton of................well, ..........spirited conversation..........
Actually - I think it is among the "cream at the top" of this thread ... unsullied by controversy, diversions or off-topic drivel.
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Old 03-16-2009, 08:23 AM   #77
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...................... I stand Corrected !
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Old 03-16-2009, 03:15 PM   #78
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The briskets been cooked..It looks awesome,tastes great VERY tender.
I'm on the last steps with it now.Shredding/slicing/making gravy.

Here's what I did.

Preheated the oven to 275 degrees
Seasoned it in a large roasting pan. As I would a roast.Salt,Freshly ground pepper corns,Onion powder,Seasoned salt.

I then caramelized 1 large Yellow Onion sliced thin,in Olive oil,2 Tbs, seasoned with S/P.

Added it to the bottom of the roasting pan,around the brisket.Added 2 cups of water.Cooked it for 8 hours.Uncovered.Until it was fork tender.

The gravy from it tastes out of this world.It's a very deep rich dark looking mahogany color. (I had Kitchen Bouquet on hand just in case) Doesn't need any salt.The roast itself is extremely tender.Rich tasting.My husband commented that it has a taste between Prime Rib,and Rolled roast.

When it was done.I left it in the pan to get and left it to cool enough to refrigerate,covered in foil.

Today I've removed it from the pan,removed the solidified fat,and placed the pan into the oven again at 175 degrees with 1 cup up water for 15 minutes, to break up all the bits.Those I'll strain out.With that I'll make the Aujus.

This project turned out fantastic.Better than I had expected. (From myself newbie brisket cooker)

I kept in mind,and used a lot of the advice given here.Good thing I did to! :)

And that's that.Thanks everyone.It was fun :)

Munky.
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Old 03-28-2009, 07:10 AM   #79
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Here's My Brisket !

Here's My Brisket !


MARINATED BARBECUE BEEF BRISKET
Yield: 6 servings
1 cup ketchup
1 cup water
2 tablespoons each: minced onion, cider vinegar
1 tablespoon mustard
2 tablespoons prepared horseradish
Coarsely cracked black pepper
1 beef brisket, about 3 1/2 pounds
2 large onions, sliced
5 carrots, peeled, cut in 1-inch chunks
5 medium red potatoes, unpeeled
Salt
2 small bags radishes, ends trimmed
Combine ketchup, water, onion, vinegar, horseradish, mustard and
pepper. Place brisket in a shallow glass baking dish. Pour marinade
over; cover and refrigerate overnight.
Heat oven to 350 degrees. Scatter onions on top of meat.
Pour Marinade over onions. Cover and
bake 2 1/2 hours. Add carrots, radishes and potatoes; cover and continue
baking until meat and vegetables are tender, about 1 hour. Add salt
and pepper to taste. Cut meat into thin slices. Use the pan juices
as sauce.
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