"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Discuss Cooking Community Forums > New Member Introductions!
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-02-2012, 12:25 PM   #11
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by carpy1985 View Post
also Chinese food almost always invariably has wheat...
No, that's incorrect. It depends on what you cook. If you eat something with wheat noodles then it has wheat, noodle recipes are only a small part of Chinese cooking. Most of my own Chinese cooking is served with white rice. Most Chinese food I've eaten in restaurants has no wheat.

When you cook your own Chinese food you pick which recipe you cook, and you control which ingredients you use. For example a simple stir fry served over white rice should satisfy your gluten free requirement, and can be quite delicious.
__________________

__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2012, 12:30 PM   #12
Assistant Cook
 
carpy1985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: England
Posts: 39
My only (limited) experience of Chinese food is pre made or takeaway and upon checking ingredients or with the chef it always includes wheat flour as the 'thickener'.

I appreciate making things yourself allows a greater level of control - to be fair this is the exact reason why I have early started to get into my cooking a lot more as you raise a really good point about not having to miss out on Chinese food if it's made differently based on my needs :)
__________________

__________________
carpy1985 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2012, 12:36 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
In my experience cornstarch is more common as the thickener in Asian foods. I don't know if you can have it, but I use a heaping tablespoon of cornstarch dissolved into a slurry with water (maybe a half cup) or a combination of water, seasonings, and soy.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2012, 12:37 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
carpy1985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: England
Posts: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie
If you ever have the chance to have wild salmon, you will never go back to farmed. I would think Scotland would be sending some of theirs south of the border. Or maybe they don't want to share it. I know they have a fleet that catches it.
Funny you should say that as I read about the difference between farmed and wild a few days back and decided I wanted to try it to see what the difference was like taste wise!

On my trip to the supermarket today I looked at the fresh farmed and it still had bits of foil stuck to it - enough to put me off! So I frequented the frozen fish section and got some Youngs Wild Salmon (checked it was Pacific and not Norway lol)

Will frozen vs fresh wild be any different?!
__________________
carpy1985 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2012, 12:39 PM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
carpy1985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: England
Posts: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
In my experience cornstarch is more common as the thickener in Asian foods. I don't know if you can have it, but I use a heaping tablespoon of cornstarch dissolved into a slurry with water (maybe a half cup) or a combination of water, seasonings, and soy.
I think in Pre made and takeaways its just cheaper and easier to use wheat - or at least that's the impression I get!

Corn flour should be good. Might have to buy some in! I have wheat free flower so I'll have to see what is in that! Normally rice corn or soya flour.

EDIT: corn starch! Need to learn the particulars!
__________________
carpy1985 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2012, 12:41 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
I was just going to add what Claire mentioned. I have never seen flour used as a thickener in Chinese cooking. It is almost always cornstarch they use, usually a cornstarch and water mixture that can be ladled into the wok as needed.

Also Carpy, don't eat wheat noodles but most noodles I've seen in Chinese food is rice noodles. I've seen wheat noodles used in some regional Chinese cooking, and also in some Japanese cooking.

I do a lot of Chinese and Thai cooking, and I never reach for the flour. Where Americans eat wheat products Asians typically eat rice products. I presume rice is okay for those who must avoid gluten.


Note also that you can purchase rice flour and other kinds of flours that do not contain wheat. However they are not a direct substitute. What you use depends on what the recipe calls for.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2012, 12:41 PM   #17
Senior Cook
 
kezlehan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Leeds, UK
Posts: 340
Welcome to DC! I live in England too. Have lived in the same city all 20 years of my life, and can't wait to get out!
Anyway, I hope you enjoy yourself here, I know I certainly do. I got a new set of (pink) knives, new chopping boards and new electric whisk for a birthday present off my grandparents, and they're probably one of the best gifts I've ever received. Practical presents are always the best ones!
Hope to see you around!
Kerry
__________________
kezlehan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2012, 12:43 PM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
carpy1985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: England
Posts: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg
I was just going to add what Claire mentioned. I have never seen flour used as a thickener in Chinese cooking. It is almost always cornstarch they use, usually a cornstarch and water mixture that can be ladled into the wok as needed.

Also Carpy, don't eat wheat noodles but most noodles I've seen in Chinese food is rice noodles. I've seen wheat noodles used in some regional Chinese cooking, and also in some Japanese cooking.

I do a lot of Chinese and Thai cooking, and I never reach for the flour. Where Americans eat wheat products Asians typically eat rice products. I presume rice is okay for those who must avoid gluten.
Yeah Rice is like the holy grail for me lol

I think you make a good point in the 'proper' Chinese food is rice flour and (lazy?!) American/English styles include wheat.

I'm just going off my own experiences here though!
__________________
carpy1985 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2012, 12:45 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
GLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Near Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,216
Quote:
Originally Posted by carpy1985 View Post
Like this:
'Cooking is like love; it should be entered into with abandon or not at all.' - Julia
Is that Julia as in Julie and Julia type Julia? Julie & Julia (2009) - IMDb
do love that film!
Julia Child, as in, "If no one's in the kitchen, who's to see?"
__________________
"Kitchen duty is awarded only to those of manifest excellence..." - The Master, Dogen
GLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2012, 12:46 PM   #20
Assistant Cook
 
carpy1985's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: England
Posts: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by kezlehan
Welcome to DC! I live in England too. Have lived in the same city all 20 years of my life, and can't wait to get out!
Anyway, I hope you enjoy yourself here, I know I certainly do. I got a new set of (pink) knives, new chopping boards and new electric whisk for a birthday present off my grandparents, and they're probably one of the best gifts I've ever received. Practical presents are always the best ones!
Hope to see you around!
Kerry
Yeah I love practical presents :D

Thanks for the warm welcome - certainly clearing up some pre conceived myths about food and I've been here for less than 24 hours lol

I live in Widnes near Liverpool!
__________________

__________________
carpy1985 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.