"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Appetizers & Hors D'oeuvres
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-27-2004, 02:50 PM   #1
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Bruschetta with Tomato and Eggplant

Scroll down for the recipe...

http://www.discusscooking.com/viewto...84&start=0

__________________

__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2004, 04:56 PM   #2
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New England
Posts: 27
This dish sounds absolutely delicious, have you ever added balsamic vinegar to your tomato mixture, I like that you take the seeds and watery tomato juice away. Have you ever cut your grilled eggplant the long way and used it to make a rolled eggplant manacotti? I have had the latter in a local (Mass) restaurant called "Mr Mikes" but have never done it myself, just wondering if you might know or if anyone else might know just how to do it.
__________________

__________________
grammadee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2004, 06:44 AM   #3
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
you can use some balsamic if the tomatoes you get aren't that good quality. if i'm using really good vine ripened tomatoes then i try not to kill that flavor with the balsamic vinegar
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2004, 09:47 AM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New England
Posts: 27
I agree, there's nothing better than the flavor of a tomato left to fully ripen before picking, especially love them still warm from the sun.

Grammadee
__________________
grammadee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2004, 12:38 AM   #5
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
Note that my wife and I celebrated our 25th in Rome in June, and found out that the "Italian Cooking" there was remarkably different from what we experience here in North America...the "bruschetta" was totally different from what we eat here...

I've tried to copy the Roman experience, and then add to our North American tastes, here's where I find myself at...

(Note too, that here in Hamilton, there are more ex-Italians than anywhere on earth outside of Italy, so I do sort have have a leg up on ingredients!)

Wee can get "Euro Bread" fresh, at the local bakeries, and so slice this up, about 3/4" thick, and butter over with "garlic butter", locally available, curiously, the cheapest works the best for me...

Fry this in a non stick pan until toasted on one side, then flip...

I like placing a slice or two of really stinky Provolone Cheese on top, and covering for about 75 seconds, but if you take the Roman example, that's not done, its just the fried bread, until toasted on both sides...

Very fresh vine ripened tomato, chopped and diced, seeds removed and pretty much "drained", shredded fresh basil, a dollop of olive oil and (regionally speaking!) a dash of fresh ground pepper, Kosher salt, some minced garlic and some finely sliced/diced scallions...all whisked together, and, after ten minutes, "drained" of the extra water that exudes out of the tomato...fresh marjoram does add to this, in my own opinion, of not my wife's...

In Rome we were offered the fried Euro in garlic butter, with proscioutto (ie "Italian Bacon") heaped atop it...not bad, but expensive here in North America...
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2004, 10:55 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Ok kids. I have it on good authority that Bruscetta is a much more simple dish than most people think. Here's the history.

In Old Italy, Bruscetta was the term applied to the bread used for testing first pressed olive oil. The bread was dipped in the oil, then toasted over an open fire. Then, raw garlic was rubbed over the coarse toast. In fact, the tem bruscetta means something akin to fire-toasted bread.

The practice was noticed by the british who found the flavor remoarkable. At the time, garlic bread was the rich-man's version, using garlic and butter baked on bread. Bruscetta was the poor man's version. That changed after the British adopted the technique. They are also the people resposible for adding various toppings. This carried over of course to North America.

Try the original version, using just a good Italian Loaf, cut into thick slices and dipped in your favorit brand of olive oil (I prefer Carapelli Extra Virgin myself). Then rub with a raw garlic clove. You will think you died and went to culinary heaven.

I believe that in Italy, the bruscetta, when topped with other ingredients is called crustini, but I may be mistaken both in spelling, and fact.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2004, 11:36 PM   #7
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
Hot Sh*t! (Comes from hunting...you might appreciate!)

I favour that olive oil too!

On the other hand, the Italians here would crucify you because "Bruschetta" is in fact the tomato/basil mixture that's dumped on top of it...some olive oil in it, some green onion/scallion mix...I like the addition of a slice or so of provolone while I fry up the bread's second side...

We could get into a pretty good conversation if we meet in SSM Ont at the Italian restaurant on #17 on the norh edge of town, where in fact the foods pretty good, if you've not been there!

I think I'd enjoy you and your wife for dinner, why don't I offer to buy?

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2004, 08:53 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Lifter; You wouldn't be talking about Giovani's now would you. I asked one of the cooks there why the pasta sauce was so bland and was told that it was because so many people had alergies to so many things that they didn't make spicy sacues any more. I was severely disappointed. Now that Ceasar's Salad at North 82, with their incredible dressing, it just blows away the competition. :D

If you live in SSM, Ont., I'm game for a meeting. I think it would be fun. Let me know when you are available. I'll bring my wife and make it a dinner date (I'm thinking a max of $20.00 U.S. per plate. I'll pay for me and my wife.)

And are Italian Canadians like French Canadians? No, wait, I won't go into political demograghics here. That is a very dangerous thing to do.

I have a freind here in Sault MI (actually, she was a great freind of my Morthers) who grew up in Italy and still has the thick accent and loves to cook authentic Italian cuisine. It makes anything I've tasted in SSM, Ont., and SSM, MI pale by comparison.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2004, 03:16 AM   #9
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
hi there!

Just got this, late at night...and now not sure about the name of the place... I live hundreds of miles from the Sault, but will likely be there regardless, for our customer, and with little better to do!

No worries on costs, I've got the magic plastic piece in the pocket that makes a dinner delight, ven where you're overnighting in a a Comfort Inn..

The French are entirely different from the Italians, but we can get into this issue verbally over supper..will let you know the schedule, as the building gets built...

Lifter
__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2004, 03:27 AM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,757
crostini is the plain oiled and grilled bread, aka toast. bruschetta is crostini rubbed with raw garlic, and topped with the tomato basil mixture, and a final drizzle of evoo.

ok, so is it broosh-etta, or broo-sketta?
__________________

__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
eggplant recipe creation amber Vegetables 20 03-05-2005 12:28 PM
Artichoke Eggplant Ring mish Vegetables 2 01-10-2005 03:06 PM
Eggplant dish help needed mjsorkin Vegetables 3 01-04-2005 04:00 AM
Slooooow Cooker Recipes - Potsticker Soup mish General Cooking 23 11-17-2004 02:44 AM
Eggplant Rollatini Raine Vegetables 2 09-03-2004 08:35 PM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.