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Old 09-23-2016, 08:36 AM   #11
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I agree with dragnlaw that an environment that acidic won't support the growth of bacteria. I've seen chutney recipes containing ginger that use the water bath method, as well as pickles that use garlic, so it should be fine.

I have never used a pH meter. My husband purchases supplies for high school science classes in his job; I can ask him if you want.
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Old 09-23-2016, 08:41 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
If you have a PH meter, or PH strips, you might aim for a low PH, 4 or 4.5???? Someone know the PH of orange marmalade or jalapeno jelly?
Found a good reference here. The pH of orange marmalade is 3.

http://www.fda.gov/food/foodborneill.../ucm122561.htm
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Old 09-23-2016, 10:46 AM   #13
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GG, wow, ph of 3 is quite low. Tomatoes are safe in the PH of 4 range.

I have litmus paper, it is not expensive but it doesn't last for years either. I wouldn't get hung up on getting a ph meter but your final product should be acidic and it should taste acidic (which orange juice does).

If you are only using a 1 inch knob of ginger, and 2 cloves of garlic, that is not a majority of the recipe. It would be like adding garlic to dill pickles so it will be okay to water bath can it.

National Center for Home Food Preservation | How Do I? Jam and Jelly
Here is a peach-orange marmalade.
Quote:
  • 5 cups finely chopped or ground peaches (about 4 pounds peaches)
  • 1 cup finely chopped or ground oranges(about 2 medium-size oranges)
  • Peel of 1 orange, shredded very fine
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 6 cups sugar
Here is marinated peppers with optional horseradish and garlic:
National Center for Home Food Preservation | How Do I? Pickle

Quote:
  • 4 lbs firm peppers*
  • 1 cup bottled lemon juice
  • 2 cups white vinegar (5 percent)
  • 1 tbsp oregano leaves
  • 1 cup olive or salad oil
  • 1/2 cup chopped onions
  • 2 cloves garlic, quartered (optional)
  • 2 tbsp prepared horseradish (optional)
I would consider the garlic and ginger you are using, similar to the optional ingredients in the marinated peppers recipe.

This is a syrup recipe (no acid except the fruit juice itself):
National Center for Home Food Preservation | How Do I? Can Fruits
Quote:
  • 1 cups juice (see Making Mayhaw Juice below)
  • 1 cups sugar
  • cup white corn syrup* (or more sugar)
    *Using Part corn syrup adds thickness without extra sweetness.
The corn syrup is optional, use sugar instead. (unless the thickness is wanted) The proportions of juice to sugar here is 1 and 1/4 cup syrup to 1 and 3/4 cup sugar. (5 to 7)

So if I was making it for my family, I'd use a recipe most similar to the ingredients and the amounts of ingredients I wanted in my recipe. I wouldn't worry much about the thickness or viscosity of the end product, since it could be thinned out when heating it to serve.

All the recipes are for water bath canning but pressure canning is preferred, you say, so pressure can it, it can't hurt it. (with those ingredients) I wouldn't say pressure can sauerkraut or pickles because that will make your product mushy.

Does this help or make it more difficult to decide?
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Old 09-24-2016, 06:53 AM   #14
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Thanks everyone,

I do stew it together on the stove, so all the ingredients are cooked through.

I have just ordered some Litmus paper i will test it before canning and let you all know.
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Old 09-24-2016, 10:07 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by jojobuller View Post
Thanks everyone,

I do stew it together on the stove, so all the ingredients are cooked through.

I have just ordered some Litmus paper i will test it before canning and let you all know.
I make and can a lot of my own recipes, and I wouldn't trust litmus paper or pH test strips. I know from experience that they're horribly inaccurate.

You really need a pH meter to measure accurately. If you're interested I can point you in the right direction. They aren't cheap, though. A decent one with a replaceable probe will run you around $150. You can get a disposable model that will last a few years for much less.

Having said that, there should be plenty of acidity in your recipe for water bath canning. If you feel like throwing caution to the wind, you're very likely safe using that method. However, If you want absolute assurance, a pH meter is the only way to be certain.
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Old 09-24-2016, 08:33 PM   #16
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I'm not sure how long you would pressure can your recipe, but depending on proportions, it looks plenty acidic. The rule of thumb for pickles is that at least half your liquid should be 5% strength vinegar. Lemon juice can be subbed and with the OJ and rice vinegar and no water, you're fine.

I use 0.0-6.0 pH papers in .5 increments. I called the company and was told these are what commercial picklers use to test their pickles (long tme ago...they probably use meters now!). I used them at our county fair when the judges tasted pickled vegetables, and I use them at home mostly to test my tomato products....tomatoes are so borderline. It's not accepted practice at my state university Extension, but it is in other states. Steve is probably right about the accuracy. I aim for 4.0 or lower.....4.6 is your "botulism can live here" point. Hydrion 0.0 -6.0
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