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Old 01-22-2010, 08:33 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by wanna be View Post
I would not worry about the weight issue.Since the mounting hardware the company says is the only way to mount the sink is not even included. I would just double up on the brackets.I think you said that you were going to have butcher block tops will that be throught the kitchen or just certain sections of the tops?I was wondering because they will be a minimum 1 1/4 thick and most likely1 1/2 thick.That would be a huge drop off to the top of the sink.That is not a problem your cabinet guy can cut this sink in to the desired depth and would look great.The real problem with butcher block tops is end grain and water.And two sides of the sink will be end grain.You could seal these with spare urithane but it would look like crap.I would have the installers cut the hole bigger on those two sides and glue in pieces with the grain running the long way and cut to final size.I know that would look awesome and will help keep your top from cracking.

Great feedback. I really appreciate it.

I'm not quite sure what kind of countertops I'll be going with, but they won't be solid butcherblocks. My original plans were to keep a large, movable butcherblock on the counter at all times, probably in the corner of the room near the sink. However if I go with this last Elkay sink, I very well may rely on the butcher block tops fit into each bowl of the sink, and only pull out a separate butcher block when the sink is otherwise occupied.

I'm thinking that I'd simply add a ribbed draining surface built into the counter surface on just the side of the sink draining into the large bowl. his way, when a large pot (or the pressure cooker itself) is cleaned, it could simply be inverted onto this draining surface to dry.


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Old 01-22-2010, 08:41 PM   #52
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For counter tops material take some time to check out a wood product made in Tacoma, WA by Richlite.http://www.richlite.com/countertop/benefits.html

This stuff is really strong. It's made of wood fibers and some kind of impermeable resin. It was originally used to make ramps for skate board parks and other architectural pieces. Now it's sold as kitchen cutting boards and in 4 by 8 sheets for projects.

I have some epicurean cutting boards made from this stuff - it is heat and water proof and looks nice - comes in colors. It's being used in high end kitchens and can be milled the same way wood can. It costs, but since it's easy to mill you save bucks on fabrication....
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:51 PM   #53
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For counter tops material take some time to check out a wood product made in Tacoma, WA by Richlite. http://www.richlite.com/countertop/

This stuff is really strong. It's made of wood fibers and some kind of impermeable resin. It was originally used to make ramps for skate board parks and other architectural pieces. Now it's sold as kitchen cutting boards and in 4 by 8 sheets for projects.

I have some epicurean cutting boards made from this stuff - it is heat and water proof and looks nice - comes in colors. It's being used in high end kitchens and can be milled the same way wood can. It costs, but since it's easy to mill you save bucks on fabrication....
The architect who designed this next little home for me lives in WA State and has spec'd Richlite for the counters in a number of places he's designed. I'll make sure I look into it a bit more as on option.

I just want to make sure I could put a ribbed draining section into it as you see here:




EDIT:

I just found this photo on the Richlite website, so it looks like we'd be good to go:





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Old 01-22-2010, 09:24 PM   #54
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Richlite is awesome stuff.I have two cutting boards made from this stuff and it is indestructable.I Use them everyday and every day they go into the dishwasher.I have however worked with this material and it would be among one of my last choices for a whole counter top.The main draw back is its so plain looking.And I mean mind numbing plain.I didd'nt even know they made it in differant colors and I am sure that could only help.Richlite has its place and that place should never include kitchen counter tops.Talk about a maintenance nightmare.
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Old 01-23-2010, 02:06 AM   #55
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I agree that I would not want a whole counter top - but I would love to have this in place of a butcher block especially in a wet prep area.
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Old 01-23-2010, 11:42 AM   #56
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I've never seen this stuff before. I'm satisfied with my corian countertops, but this stuff looks like it would make an awesome cutting board.

I love the idea of the draining section into the sink. Now THAT is a design idea.

Diavolicchio, you are going to have such a beautiful canning kitchen you won't want to spend your time in your REGULAR kitchen!
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Old 01-23-2010, 12:21 PM   #57
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IT's funny how we went away from that for a while. When I grew up we had a large single sink with a drain area on both sides. It was one piece and fit on a metal cabinet. Every now and then I think about what a great sink that would be to work at. If I could find one (REASONABLE!) I would get it and redesign my kitchen just to accommodate it.
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Old 01-23-2010, 12:27 PM   #58
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I remember a discussion we had some time ago about bamboo cutting boards and their effect on knife edges. The bottom line was while the bamboo was soft enough to be kind to a knife edge, the RESIN used to bind and form the cutting board is super hard and therefore not a great material for a cutting board.

It sounds like that's what's going on here with the Richlite. Something to consider...
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Old 01-23-2010, 01:09 PM   #59
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John, perhaps then your question would be better asked on a design forum.

Honestly, I think you are asking a question that the posters here are not equipped to answer. Few of us can on the scale you describe (with the notable exception of yourself and bethzaring) so we have nothing to offer you.

Good luck. Hope you find some help.

What are you thinking about your original response now, Alix? I was just curious. . .


* * * * *

I don't think it's about finding people who've canned on a large scale at all; it's about finding a few people willing to think through the process of how they would layout and equip a canning kitchen in a smaller space, address the many tasks involved in the canning process, and do so in a way that's as functional, efficient and aesthetically pleasing as possible.

It's basically a hypothetical exercise.

Many of the suggestions that have been presented here thus far have been very helpful and have made me re-think a number of aspects of what I thought I already had ironed out.

For what it's worth, I think you may have been a little quick to underestimate the people on here and the great ideas they could offer.

Keep 'em coming, folks. . .



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Old 01-23-2010, 01:56 PM   #60
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John, when I said good luck I meant it! And you have had some wonderful luck here. I'm very happy for you. I read back and see that your reaction to my initial response was pretty unhappy. I didn't intend for you to feel slighted, my apologies, what I was trying to convey was that perhaps no one here understood the scope of your project. You've since elaborated a whole bunch on what you want, and have answered many specific questions. I am now better able to "see" your kitchen. I couldn't do that at the beginning at all. It seems a few of us thought perhaps a professional would be better equipped to answer your questions. I'm a KISS girl myself, and frankly I'm a design idiot. When I had my kitchen renoed I had one contractor come in and say, "why don't you ......" and all I could think was, "Oh YEAH! Why didn't I think of that???"

I'm really glad that the thread progressed and that you got some input that works for you. Its also lovely to see that all the differences seem to have been ironed out. Please share some actual photos when you are done, and if you are just giving away all that marinara I'll send you my address too!
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