"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-08-2008, 04:02 PM   #1
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Mooresville, NC
Posts: 3,102
"Will keep in freezer for X amount of time"???

Maybe I'm dense but why would something frozen have a short life span? There is a recipe I was looking at that says "freezes for a month." Now, when I make chili I freeze it for up to a year. My mom used to do spaghetti sauce (which is what this recipe is for) and keep it for many months. Why would a sauce, or anything have such a short frozen life? I thought frozen food survived just about anything.

__________________

__________________
Callisto in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 04:46 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
Frozen food still degrades over time, through oxydation, for example. But at a much, much slower rate when kept so cold. So overall quality (texture, flavor and nutritiousness) deteriorates even though it's still safe to eat.

Physics. Half Life. Some law of thermodymanics?
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 04:49 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,399
Even frozen food lose it's original quality even if it's not going bad.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 07:39 PM   #4
Senior Cook
 
ErikC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 283
If it is stored in vacuum sealed bags and then frozen, then no evaporation should occur; at least not as much. The seal is more important than the vacuum.
__________________
Erik

http://www.homemade-soup-recipes.com/
ErikC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 09:54 PM   #5
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 337
Hi Callisto,
This is my first posting to this site as I live in the UK, no, not England, in Scotland - so I do hope this effort of mine works. Re. your question: freezing often intensifies flavours, especially salt, pepper and any spices. Might I suggest that your Mum was clearlya clever cook who knew to taste any previously frozen and then reheated sauce before adding to pasta and then moderated the flavour if it did not meet her standards by adding some of the water in which the pasta was cooked, or maybe a little water or een some milk. Did you watch your mum cook like I did?
regards,
Archiduc
__________________
archiduc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2008, 04:59 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,270
Welcome to DC Archiduc!!

And freezer burn is also a problem with some items.
__________________
Too many restaurants, not enough time...
Bilby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2008, 02:07 PM   #7
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2
Freezer burn is caused by cold air around the product, sucking the moisture out of the food. Using a vacuum sealer device such as the foodsaver products, will greatly increase the time that food can be frozen since the food is not only sealed from the air in the freezer, but also, must of the air around the food is removed. Therefore, the food will retain its moisture and not burn.
__________________
CanningPantry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2008, 01:14 AM   #8
Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
Maybe I'm dense but why would something frozen have a short life span? There is a recipe I was looking at that says "freezes for a month." Now, when I make chili I freeze it for up to a year. My mom used to do spaghetti sauce (which is what this recipe is for) and keep it for many months. Why would a sauce, or anything have such a short frozen life? I thought frozen food survived just about anything.
Food goes bad when oxidized. Various things can be done to slow down the rate of oxidation, such as freezing. Better yet, vaccum sealed and frozen to reduce rate of oxidation even more. It would depend (I think) on what you have frozen, how well it is wrapped, temperature of freezer, etc... would help determine how long something can be in a freezer and not go bad.

After a while in the freezer, the food can lose its texture and taste. If something is homemade, such as a sauce, it would last shorter than a sauce made with various preservatives.

Even if something is vaccum sealed, oxygen still can enter, thus it cannot stay frozen forever. It will go bad eventually.
__________________
Inferno is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2008, 11:10 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Freezing doesn't stop biological degration - it just signaficantly retards it. Vacuum sealing food extends it's life over foods not vacuum sealed ... but it does not preserve it forever, either. Even under the best of conditions - foods begin to lose quality of texture and nutrition as soon as they are picked.

So, back to Callisto's original question - the shorter the time the food is frozen the more it will taste like it did when fresh. And, as archiduc mentioned, herbs and seasonings can be significantly altered through prolonged freezing and may need to be adjusted when thawed and heated - some intensify and some go flat ... you just have to taste and make the appropriate adjustments.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2008, 02:14 PM   #10
Head Chef
 
Jeff G.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Indiana
Posts: 1,352
Quote:
Originally Posted by Callisto in NC View Post
Maybe I'm dense but why would something frozen have a short life span? There is a recipe I was looking at that says "freezes for a month." Now, when I make chili I freeze it for up to a year. My mom used to do spaghetti sauce (which is what this recipe is for) and keep it for many months. Why would a sauce, or anything have such a short frozen life? I thought frozen food survived just about anything.
I think a lot of it has to do with the freezers a lot of people use. frost free refridgerator freezers will not hold food for very long. They cycle in and out of cold and most aren't really a deep freeze. My cabinet freezer is very cold. you put something in it and it remains like a rock for a long time. Meat takes a couple of days in the refrigerator to start thawing. A good seal is also important. I have used meats well sealed and frozen for 6 months or more with no problems at all.
__________________

__________________
Jeff G. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.